Letter to McLean, 2 Sep 1853

Reference Number: MS-Papers-0032-0677B-12. Object #1030871

A report of land information and includes a sketch probably of Kaikoura and the surrounding area

3 pages, related to Wiremu Te Kahui Kararehe, Kaikoura and Te Ati Awa.

A transcription/translation of this document (by E Ma) appears below.

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Te Reo Maori (E Ma)

Hepetema 1853



17, no te rua tekau ma whitu o nga ra o Hepetema, ka tukua atu e maua te toenga o to maua kainga i hoatu e maua mo Kawana, hei mea hoatu noa ma maua, ara, mo ana tikanga pai kua takoto nei ki a maua, ara, koia tenei ko tana whakanuinga i a maua, ara, mo etahi tikanga aroha mai ona ki a maua. Koia ra ka rapu nei te ngakau, koia ano inahoki ka tika ano i to tatou matua[?], i te kaiwhakahaere tikanga o to tatou kainga, i a te Kawana, he tikanga pai mo tatou, ka ora tatou, ka noho tatou i runga i te rangimarire.

No reira maua nei i rapu ai ki te toenga i toe nei, ara, koia tenei ko Moroa, ka tukua nei e maua mo runga i te aroha nui o to tatou Kawana, mo te homaitanga i te oranga ki a maua, mo te whakanuinga hoki i a maua, ara, koia tenei ko tana whakahokinga mai i tetahi wahi whenua mo mau[a?], ko te maha noa iho o nga tikanga pai e puta mai ana ki a maua. Koia tenei ka timata nei i tenei ra, ara, i nga tau o to tatou Ariki a Ihu Karaiti, te kaiwhakaora i a tatou. Ki te mea ka hokona te whenua, katahi pea tatou ka nui ake i runga i enei tikanga, inahoki ka noho tahi tatou ki a ratou, ka whangai hipi, kau, hoiho hoki i roto i enei tikanga e whakapuakina nei, kia rongo tatou i korerotia e Te Makarini, ki o tatou taringa.

E pai ana ki aku whakaaro kia he tatou, he ki runga i enei tikanga, kia ora tatou i runga ano i enei tikanga, e pai ana ra. Kua whakaaro maua nei ki runga i nga tikanga pai e korerotia nei e te kaiwhakahaere tikanga, ara, e Te Makarini. Ka rongo nei maua ki ana korero, ka ora ake o maua nei ngakau, e takoto mate ana

English (E Ma)

September 1853



17, on the 17th of September we released the remainder of our land that we had given to the Governor. And we gave it, really, on account of his good services to us, that is, his great consideration towards us, and his kind attention to us. We had searched our minds and [come to] appreciate our father, the administrator of our lands, the Governor,who set things right and brought good results for us, which benefit us and have us all living in peace.

For this rreason we gave thought to the remainder, that is, Moroa, to giving it out of our great affection for our Governor, for his giving us sustenance, for his great consideration of us, such as his returning to us a part of the land for ourselves, and for the many other good things that resulted for us. And so [our consideration] was, from that day in the year of our Lord Jesus Christ our Saviour, that if the land is sold, then perhaps we will all gain from this situation, because we will live together with them, raise sheep, cows and horses by the methods revealed to us, and which our ears have heard described by McLean.

Well, in my view, it would be all right even if we made a mistake, were disadvantaged by these ways, [but] if things went well for us, that would be good indeed. We reflected on the good practices that the administrator, McLean, had told us about. When we heard him speak, our hearts, which had been burdened

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Te Reo Maori (E Ma)

hoki o maua nei ngakau i runga i nga tikanga Maori. Na, no muri iho ka rongo maua ki te tikanga ki a Te Makarini, e mea mai ana ki a maua,'E tama, ki te mea ka tuku mai e korua to korua kainga ki a te Kuini, katahi korua ka ahua tangata i runga i to korua kainga.' Katahi ano maua ka whakaaro, e koia ano, na, ka huri maua nei ki o maua nei whakaaro, ka ahu ano ki runga i te whakaaro Maori pohehe, rapu noa a te kitea tetahi whakaaro pai i runga i nga tikanga Maori. No muri iho ka ahu maua ki te rapu tikanga i runga i a Te Makarini tikanga e korero ai ki a maua. Ka mea ano te wahi o te whakaaro Maori, e koi raru taua. Ka mea mai ia, 'Tahuri mai ki ahau kia ahua tupu tangata i a korua i runga i to korua kainga.' Ka mea ano te whakaaro Maori, e kore hoki e pai to maua nuinga ake, inahoki kua riro noa hoki to maua nei kainga. Ka pehea ai te maunga o te mana tino tangata i te mea ra ia e mau ana to maua nei kainga e rangatira ana maua nei.

[Note to the side] E ta, e Wiremu, kia pai te mahi ki a Te Makarini

[No signatory]

English (E Ma)

under our Maori customs, lifted. And later we understood McLean's proposal, when he said to us, 'Young men, if you give your land to the Queen, then you could be better people in your homes.' Then we thought, well that's it, having turned it over in our minds and considered the mistaken views of the Maori, having searched in vain and not found one good aspect of Maori custom. Then later we looked to examining the correctness of what McLean had told us, and thought again that the way of Maori thinking would end in trouble. He said to us, 'Turn my way so that you can develop as better people in your homes.' But still Maori thinking suggested that our development would not be good since our land would be taken away. How could the authority of a real person be maintained if our land, which ennobles us, was taken?

[Note to side] Sir, William, work well for McLean.

[No signatory]

Te Reo Maori (E Ma)

Hepetema 1853



17, no te rua tekau ma whitu o nga ra o Hepetema, ka tukua atu e maua te toenga o to maua kainga i hoatu e maua mo Kawana, hei mea hoatu noa ma maua, ara, mo ana tikanga pai kua takoto nei ki a maua, ara, koia tenei ko tana whakanuinga i a maua, ara, mo etahi tikanga aroha mai ona ki a maua. Koia ra ka rapu nei te ngakau, koia ano inahoki ka tika ano i to tatou matua[?], i te kaiwhakahaere tikanga o to tatou kainga, i a te Kawana, he tikanga pai mo tatou, ka ora tatou, ka noho tatou i runga i te rangimarire.

No reira maua nei i rapu ai ki te toenga i toe nei, ara, koia tenei ko Moroa, ka tukua nei e maua mo runga i te aroha nui o to tatou Kawana, mo te homaitanga i te oranga ki a maua, mo te whakanuinga hoki i a maua, ara, koia tenei ko tana whakahokinga mai i tetahi wahi whenua mo mau[a?], ko te maha noa iho o nga tikanga pai e puta mai ana ki a maua. Koia tenei ka timata nei i tenei ra, ara, i nga tau o to tatou Ariki a Ihu Karaiti, te kaiwhakaora i a tatou. Ki te mea ka hokona te whenua, katahi pea tatou ka nui ake i runga i enei tikanga, inahoki ka noho tahi tatou ki a ratou, ka whangai hipi, kau, hoiho hoki i roto i enei tikanga e whakapuakina nei, kia rongo tatou i korerotia e Te Makarini, ki o tatou taringa.

E pai ana ki aku whakaaro kia he tatou, he ki runga i enei tikanga, kia ora tatou i runga ano i enei tikanga, e pai ana ra. Kua whakaaro maua nei ki runga i nga tikanga pai e korerotia nei e te kaiwhakahaere tikanga, ara, e Te Makarini. Ka rongo nei maua ki ana korero, ka ora ake o maua nei ngakau, e takoto mate ana hoki o maua nei ngakau i runga i nga tikanga Maori. Na, no muri iho ka rongo maua ki te tikanga ki a Te Makarini, e mea mai ana ki a maua,'E tama, ki te mea ka tuku mai e korua to korua kainga ki a te Kuini, katahi korua ka ahua tangata i runga i to korua kainga.' Katahi ano maua ka whakaaro, e koia ano, na, ka huri maua nei ki o maua nei whakaaro, ka ahu ano ki runga i te whakaaro Maori pohehe, rapu noa a te kitea tetahi whakaaro pai i runga i nga tikanga Maori. No muri iho ka ahu maua ki te rapu tikanga i runga i a Te Makarini tikanga e korero ai ki a maua. Ka mea ano te wahi o te whakaaro Maori, e koi raru taua. Ka mea mai ia, 'Tahuri mai ki ahau kia ahua tupu tangata i a korua i runga i to korua kainga.' Ka mea ano te whakaaro Maori, e kore hoki e pai to maua nuinga ake, inahoki kua riro noa hoki to maua nei kainga. Ka pehea ai te maunga o te mana tino tangata i te mea ra ia e mau ana to maua nei kainga e rangatira ana maua nei.

[Note to the side] E ta, e Wiremu, kia pai te mahi ki a Te Makarini

[No signatory]

English (E Ma)

September 1853



17, on the 17th of September we released the remainder of our land that we had given to the Governor. And we gave it, really, on account of his good services to us, that is, his great consideration towards us, and his kind attention to us. We had searched our minds and [come to] appreciate our father, the administrator of our lands, the Governor,who set things right and brought good results for us, which benefit us and have us all living in peace.

For this rreason we gave thought to the remainder, that is, Moroa, to giving it out of our great affection for our Governor, for his giving us sustenance, for his great consideration of us, such as his returning to us a part of the land for ourselves, and for the many other good things that resulted for us. And so [our consideration] was, from that day in the year of our Lord Jesus Christ our Saviour, that if the land is sold, then perhaps we will all gain from this situation, because we will live together with them, raise sheep, cows and horses by the methods revealed to us, and which our ears have heard described by McLean.

Well, in my view, it would be all right even if we made a mistake, were disadvantaged by these ways, [but] if things went well for us, that would be good indeed. We reflected on the good practices that the administrator, McLean, had told us about. When we heard him speak, our hearts, which had been burdened under our Maori customs, lifted. And later we understood McLean's proposal, when he said to us, 'Young men, if you give your land to the Queen, then you could be better people in your homes.' Then we thought, well that's it, having turned it over in our minds and considered the mistaken views of the Maori, having searched in vain and not found one good aspect of Maori custom. Then later we looked to examining the correctness of what McLean had told us, and thought again that the way of Maori thinking would end in trouble. He said to us, 'Turn my way so that you can develop as better people in your homes.' But still Maori thinking suggested that our development would not be good since our land would be taken away. How could the authority of a real person be maintained if our land, which ennobles us, was taken?

[Note to side] Sir, William, work well for McLean.

[No signatory]

Part of:
Inward letters in Maori, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0677B (23 digitised items)
Series 2 Inward letters (Maori), Reference Number Series 2 Inward letters (Maori) (3148 digitised items)
McLean Papers, Reference Number MS-Group-1551 (30238 digitised items)

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