Letter from Tareha Te Moananui and others to George Grey, 2 May 1851

Reference Number: MS-Papers-0032-0675D-03. Object #1030755

Letter written from Ahuriri

4 pages written 2 May 1851 by Tareha Te Moananui in Ahuriri to Sir George Grey, related to Ngati Kahungunu.

A transcription/translation of this document (by E Ma) appears below.

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Page 1 of 4. View high-resolution image

Te Reo Maori (E Ma)

Ahuriri
2 Mei 1851


E hoa, e Te Kawana,

Tenei ta matou kupu ki a koe. Kia rongo mai koe, kua tukuna atu to matou kainga ki a Te Makarini, kua whakaaetia nuitia ki tona aroaro. Kua tukuna atu i runga i te £1,500.0.0 pauna mo to matou kainga.

Na, e ta, te Kawana ... [ink blot] i a matou. Ka timata nei ... [ink blot] ...hoa ki a koe, kia kaua hoki koe e whakaroa atu i etahi Pakeha mo to matou kainga, no te mea hoki ko te putake tenei o to matou ritenga tuku whenua ki a koe, koia matou ka tuhituhi atu ai ki a koe. Me[?] homai he Pakeha mo to matou[?] kainga, kia nui noa atu kia rite ai hoki nga utu o a matou rawa. Me ka hoatu ki te Pakeha kia rite ai hoki to tatou whakakotahitanga. Ko ta matou tikanga kia whakaritea he taone ki to matou kainga ki Ahuriri, kia rite mai i a koe, tenei te taone mo to matou kainga, kia hohoro mai. Ko tetahi wahi a matou,

English (E Ma)

Ahuriri
2 May 1851


Friend, Governor,

This is our word to you. Listen, we have given over our land to McLean, and it has been widely agreed to in his presence. Our land has been given over to him for the sum of £1500.0.0.

Now, sir, Governor ... [ink blot, illegible] us. It begins ... [ink blot] ...to you, so that you don't delay Pakeha [from taking?] our land, for this is the reason for our arranging to give the land to you, and that is why we write to you. Let us have Pakeha for our land, many of them to organise the purchase of our possessions. And if that [the money?] is given to the Pakeha, it will ensure our unity. Our intention is for a town to be set up on our land at Ahuriri, and for you to arrange it, this town on our land, and for it to happen quickly. For one part of ours,

Page 2 of 4. View high-resolution image

Te Reo Maori (E Ma)

ko nga utu mo to matou kainga, hei roto i te tau e haere ake nei. Ka whakatakoto nga utu i roto i te tau 1852, ka whakatako[to] ai te tuatahi mo te tau 1850, ka takoto te tuarua. Heoti ano ta matou kupu ki a koe.


Na ou hoa aroha,
na Taruka, na Te Moananui, na Paora, na Te Waka ....[and other names, some illegible because of damage to letter]. Heoti ano.

No Ahuriri

English (E Ma)

the payments for the land will be coming in the year ahead. The payments will be received in 1852; the first was received in the year 1850, and thereafter there is the second. That is all we have to say to you.


From your good friends,
Taruka, Te Moananui, na Paora, na Te Waka ...[and other names, some illegible because of damage to letter]. That's all.

From Ahuriri

Page 3 of 4. View high-resolution image

Te Reo Maori (E Ma)


Ko ta matou e pai ai me heke hou mai he Pakeha mo to matou kainga, hei te heke o Ingarangi, he heke mo to matou kainga. Heoti ano tenei wahi.

Ko te mea i tohe atu ai matou kia homai he Pakeha, he pouri no matou ki nga utu o to matou kainga, kihai i ata rite ki a[? ink blots or damage to letter in following passages] ...matou i whakarite ... Ka ki atu nei ... nga utu mo .... kainga. Ko te Pakeha kia nui mai kia ngata ai hoki o matou ngakau.

Kai te pouri ...Te Makarini .... to matou kainga e ...a Te Makarini kai a koe hoki tetahi ... to matou kainga. Na, e ... a Te Makarini. Heoti ano tana. Kua oti ... Te Makarini tohenga ki to matou wahi whenua, kua tukua atu ki a ia. Ko ta matou tohenga utu kaore i rite i a ia. Heoti ano.

[Parts of the manuscript are illegible, and the transcription therefore incomplete]

English (E Ma)


What we would like is for some new Pakeha to come onto our land, from the migrants from England, those ones for our land. So much about that part.

The reason we are arguing for Pakeha, is on account of our being upset over the payments for our land, which were not properly arranged with [? ink blot] ... we arranged ... ... We say ... the payments for .... the land. And the many Pakeha who should come will satisfy our hearts.

We are sad ...McLean .... our land ...McLean, you have a... our land. Now, sir, McLean. Enough of that. It is completed ... McLean persisting about our land, which was given to him. But our arguing for payment he has not settled. That is all.

[Parts of the manuscript are illegible, and the translation therefore incomplete]

Te Reo Maori (E Ma)

Ahuriri
2 Mei 1851


E hoa, e Te Kawana,

Tenei ta matou kupu ki a koe. Kia rongo mai koe, kua tukuna atu to matou kainga ki a Te Makarini, kua whakaaetia nuitia ki tona aroaro. Kua tukuna atu i runga i te £1,500.0.0 pauna mo to matou kainga.

Na, e ta, te Kawana ... [ink blot] i a matou. Ka timata nei ... [ink blot] ...hoa ki a koe, kia kaua hoki koe e whakaroa atu i etahi Pakeha mo to matou kainga, no te mea hoki ko te putake tenei o to matou ritenga tuku whenua ki a koe, koia matou ka tuhituhi atu ai ki a koe. Me[?] homai he Pakeha mo to matou[?] kainga, kia nui noa atu kia rite ai hoki nga utu o a matou rawa. Me ka hoatu ki te Pakeha kia rite ai hoki to tatou whakakotahitanga. Ko ta matou tikanga kia whakaritea he taone ki to matou kainga ki Ahuriri, kia rite mai i a koe, tenei te taone mo to matou kainga, kia hohoro mai. Ko tetahi wahi a matou, ko nga utu mo to matou kainga, hei roto i te tau e haere ake nei. Ka whakatakoto nga utu i roto i te tau 1852, ka whakatako[to] ai te tuatahi mo te tau 1850, ka takoto te tuarua. Heoti ano ta matou kupu ki a koe.


Na ou hoa aroha,
na Taruka, na Te Moananui, na Paora, na Te Waka ....[and other names, some illegible because of damage to letter]. Heoti ano.

No Ahuriri

Ko ta matou e pai ai me heke hou mai he Pakeha mo to matou kainga, hei te heke o Ingarangi, he heke mo to matou kainga. Heoti ano tenei wahi.

Ko te mea i tohe atu ai matou kia homai he Pakeha, he pouri no matou ki nga utu o to matou kainga, kihai i ata rite ki a[? ink blots or damage to letter in following passages] ...matou i whakarite ... Ka ki atu nei ... nga utu mo .... kainga. Ko te Pakeha kia nui mai kia ngata ai hoki o matou ngakau.

Kai te pouri ...Te Makarini .... to matou kainga e ...a Te Makarini kai a koe hoki tetahi ... to matou kainga. Na, e ... a Te Makarini. Heoti ano tana. Kua oti ... Te Makarini tohenga ki to matou wahi whenua, kua tukua atu ki a ia. Ko ta matou tohenga utu kaore i rite i a ia. Heoti ano.

[Parts of the manuscript are illegible, and the transcription therefore incomplete]

English (E Ma)

Ahuriri
2 May 1851


Friend, Governor,

This is our word to you. Listen, we have given over our land to McLean, and it has been widely agreed to in his presence. Our land has been given over to him for the sum of £1500.0.0.

Now, sir, Governor ... [ink blot, illegible] us. It begins ... [ink blot] ...to you, so that you don't delay Pakeha [from taking?] our land, for this is the reason for our arranging to give the land to you, and that is why we write to you. Let us have Pakeha for our land, many of them to organise the purchase of our possessions. And if that [the money?] is given to the Pakeha, it will ensure our unity. Our intention is for a town to be set up on our land at Ahuriri, and for you to arrange it, this town on our land, and for it to happen quickly. For one part of ours, the payments for the land will be coming in the year ahead. The payments will be received in 1852; the first was received in the year 1850, and thereafter there is the second. That is all we have to say to you.


From your good friends,
Taruka, Te Moananui, na Paora, na Te Waka ...[and other names, some illegible because of damage to letter]. That's all.

From Ahuriri

What we would like is for some new Pakeha to come onto our land, from the migrants from England, those ones for our land. So much about that part.

The reason we are arguing for Pakeha, is on account of our being upset over the payments for our land, which were not properly arranged with [? ink blot] ... we arranged ... ... We say ... the payments for .... the land. And the many Pakeha who should come will satisfy our hearts.

We are sad ...McLean .... our land ...McLean, you have a... our land. Now, sir, McLean. Enough of that. It is completed ... McLean persisting about our land, which was given to him. But our arguing for payment he has not settled. That is all.

[Parts of the manuscript are illegible, and the translation therefore incomplete]

Part of:
Inward letters in Maori, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0675D (20 digitised items)
Series 2 Inward letters (Maori), Reference Number Series 2 Inward letters (Maori) (3148 digitised items)
McLean Papers, Reference Number MS-Group-1551 (30238 digitised items)

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