Letter from Te Ngahuru to McLean, 15 Sep 1849

Reference Number: MS-Papers-0032-0673C-09. Object #1030171

From Omata regarding land purchases

2 pages written 15 Sep 1849 by Tamati Wiremu Te Ngahuru in Omata to Sir Donald McLean, related to Taranaki (Taranaki Iwi).

A transcription/translation of this document (by E Ma) appears below.

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Te Reo Maori (E Ma)

10 Oketopa 1849

Omata

E hoa, e Te Makarini,

Kia rongo mai koe ki taku korero mo nga tangata, mo te tikanga o tau korero, mo nga moni mo Rawiri. Kua korero au ki a ratou, e mea ana te whakaaro a nga tangata e he ana te whakaaro o tena Pakeha.

E hoa, e Makarini, e mea ana te whakaaro a nga tangata e penei tonu tau tikanga mo nga tangata o nga motu, e ngaro ana ki Poneke. Ka tae mai tena tangata, ka mea, 'E Ma, homai tetahi moni maku. Kahore au i tango i nga moni o tenei whenua.' E pena katoa te whakaaro o nga tangata o nga motu i Arapawa, e pena tonu te whakaaro me te whakaaro o Rawiri. I pouri katoa te whakaaro o nga tangata mo tau tikanga, mo nga peke moni, mo Rawiri. Ka mea atu au ki a ratou, 'E hoa ma, kahore kua rongo au ki a Ma kotahi peke, 10 pauna ki roto. Ko ta Ma tenei i korero mai ai ki au.'

English (E Ma)

10 October 1849

Omata

Friend, McLean,

Listen to what I have to say about the people, about the point of your discussion concerning the money for Rawiri. I have spoken to them and in the opinion of the people the Pakeha has got it wrong.

Friend, McLean, the people express the view that you behave in the same way as the people throughout the land who disappear to Port Nicholson. A person comes and says, 'Ma, give me some money. I never got money for this land.' That's how all the people in the land of Arapawa think, and Rawiri thinks the same. Everyone is disappointed with your behaviour regarding the bags of money that Rawiri received. I said to them, 'Friends, I have not heard Ma [talk] about one bag with £10 in it. That is what Ma has said to me.'

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Te Reo Maori (E Ma)

Ka ki atu au ki a ratou, 'E hoa ma, tenei ano taku whakaaro, kia rongo mai koutou. E kore au e pouri mo tenei, no te mea kua mutu nga mea mo tatou. Kia pai te whakaaro. Tenei ano toku whakaaro, kei te rapu au i te whakaaro tika i te whakaaro marire, kei kuaware tatou ki nga tikanga pai, kei tango tatou ki nga tikanga kino. Kia pai te whakaaro.' Heoi ano, e hoa, naku tenei korero ki a ratou.

E Ma, kia rongo mai koe ki taku, kia pai to whakaaro, kia tika. Ki te mea kotahi kua rongo au ki a koe, kotahi peke mo Rawiri, e pai ana, mau e hoatu ki a ia te peke kotahi, 10 tahi tekau pauna ki roto. Ki te mea ka hoatu e koe ki Rawiri, kotahi tekau pauna, mau e tuhituhi mai ki au.


Na
Te Ngahuru

English (E Ma)

I said to them, 'Friends, this is my view, so hear it. I am not upset about this because the things for us have all been concluded. Think positively. This is also my way of thinking, I search for a proper idea, a peaceful idea, so that we don't become ignorant of good practice and take up with bad practices. Think positively.' Well, friend, that's what I said to them.

Ma, listen to what I say: think about it properly and correctly. If there is one that I am to hear of from you, one bag for Rawiri, I accept that; you give him one bag with £10 in it. But if you are to give Rawiri £10, write to me.


From
Te Ngahuru

[Note on side] 'Oct. 10 1848. Te Ngahuru respecting his claim.'

Te Reo Maori (E Ma)

10 Oketopa 1849

Omata

E hoa, e Te Makarini,

Kia rongo mai koe ki taku korero mo nga tangata, mo te tikanga o tau korero, mo nga moni mo Rawiri. Kua korero au ki a ratou, e mea ana te whakaaro a nga tangata e he ana te whakaaro o tena Pakeha.

E hoa, e Makarini, e mea ana te whakaaro a nga tangata e penei tonu tau tikanga mo nga tangata o nga motu, e ngaro ana ki Poneke. Ka tae mai tena tangata, ka mea, 'E Ma, homai tetahi moni maku. Kahore au i tango i nga moni o tenei whenua.' E pena katoa te whakaaro o nga tangata o nga motu i Arapawa, e pena tonu te whakaaro me te whakaaro o Rawiri. I pouri katoa te whakaaro o nga tangata mo tau tikanga, mo nga peke moni, mo Rawiri. Ka mea atu au ki a ratou, 'E hoa ma, kahore kua rongo au ki a Ma kotahi peke, 10 pauna ki roto. Ko ta Ma tenei i korero mai ai ki au.' Ka ki atu au ki a ratou, 'E hoa ma, tenei ano taku whakaaro, kia rongo mai koutou. E kore au e pouri mo tenei, no te mea kua mutu nga mea mo tatou. Kia pai te whakaaro. Tenei ano toku whakaaro, kei te rapu au i te whakaaro tika i te whakaaro marire, kei kuaware tatou ki nga tikanga pai, kei tango tatou ki nga tikanga kino. Kia pai te whakaaro.' Heoi ano, e hoa, naku tenei korero ki a ratou.

E Ma, kia rongo mai koe ki taku, kia pai to whakaaro, kia tika. Ki te mea kotahi kua rongo au ki a koe, kotahi peke mo Rawiri, e pai ana, mau e hoatu ki a ia te peke kotahi, 10 tahi tekau pauna ki roto. Ki te mea ka hoatu e koe ki Rawiri, kotahi tekau pauna, mau e tuhituhi mai ki au.


Na
Te Ngahuru

English (E Ma)

10 October 1849

Omata

Friend, McLean,

Listen to what I have to say about the people, about the point of your discussion concerning the money for Rawiri. I have spoken to them and in the opinion of the people the Pakeha has got it wrong.

Friend, McLean, the people express the view that you behave in the same way as the people throughout the land who disappear to Port Nicholson. A person comes and says, 'Ma, give me some money. I never got money for this land.' That's how all the people in the land of Arapawa think, and Rawiri thinks the same. Everyone is disappointed with your behaviour regarding the bags of money that Rawiri received. I said to them, 'Friends, I have not heard Ma [talk] about one bag with £10 in it. That is what Ma has said to me.' I said to them, 'Friends, this is my view, so hear it. I am not upset about this because the things for us have all been concluded. Think positively. This is also my way of thinking, I search for a proper idea, a peaceful idea, so that we don't become ignorant of good practice and take up with bad practices. Think positively.' Well, friend, that's what I said to them.

Ma, listen to what I say: think about it properly and correctly. If there is one that I am to hear of from you, one bag for Rawiri, I accept that; you give him one bag with £10 in it. But if you are to give Rawiri £10, write to me.


From
Te Ngahuru

[Note on side] 'Oct. 10 1848. Te Ngahuru respecting his claim.'

Part of:
Inward letters in Maori, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0673C (11 digitised items)
Series 2 Inward letters (Maori), Reference Number Series 2 Inward letters (Maori) (3148 digitised items)
McLean Papers, Reference Number MS-Group-1551 (30238 digitised items)

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