Object #1027494 from MS-Papers-0032-0826

4 pages written 21 Sep 1850 by Susan Douglas McLean in Wellington to Sir Donald McLean

From: Inward and outward family correspondence - Susan McLean (wife), Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0826 (43 digitised items). Mainly letters between Susan Strang and her future husband Donald McLean. Includes a letter from her mother Susannah Strang to McLean, 1849; letter from E Shand to Susan Strang, written from Portobello, 1850 in which she gives her impressions of Dunedin

A transcription/translation of this document (by MD) appears below.

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Page 1 of 4. View high-resolution image

English (MD)

Dalmuir Hill
September 21st 1850


My dear Mr McLean

I am delighted to hear that you think you will soon be able to come to Wellington. I hope nothing will again occur to prevent you. I heard last Sunday from Mrs Kirton that you had returned to Rangitikei. She also told me that it was likely you would be here this week. As I heard this I have been expecting every day to see you. On Tuesday evening I heard the gate open. I went out and I was sure it was you I saw coming up. I ran half way down the hill before I found

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English (MD)

I was mistaken. It was only some person bringing to Mr Kirton, who was dining with us, the plan of his house. I am glad you stay with Mr Duncan when at Manawatu for I am sure you must be comfortable there from what I have heard of Mrs Duncan. I think she must be a very fine person.

You say you heard that Miss Kelly was to have been married to Mr Robinson. I think that is nonsense. I was told so long ago but I never believed it was true. I never saw Mr Robinson, but from what I have heard of him I do not think he is a person I would have liked to have seen Miss Kelly marry. I am glad that you do not disapprove of knitting and crochet. I think a great many gentlemen dislike to see that kind of work.

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English (MD)

They say that it is waste of time. It is wrong to neglect work of more consequence for it but I think when everything else is done it is a nice amusement. I am doing just now an antimacassar for Mama. That is one of those things for the back of chairs. After that is done I am going to make a collar for Mrs Kirton but I think I must make your watch guard first, for if you come in and find it not done you will tease me dreadfully about it. Mrs Kirton and I have not gone to Evans Bay yet. We intend to wait till it is convenient for the minister to go with us. We are afraid to go without a gentleman as there are often wild cattle there and we are both great cowards. I am very fond of Mrs Kirton. She is such a

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English (MD)

warm hearted kind person. The longer I know her the more I like her.

I am afraid I must now conclude which I am most unwilling to do as I should like to continue writing to you but I have stupidly allowed the fire to go out and is very cold. I am sure also it must be late. Everybody is in bed and asleep but myself. I hope you will forgive me for writing such a short letter. I shall write a longer one by the next mail. Good night dearest and believe me to remain ever your affectionate


Susan Douglas Strang

English (MD)

Dalmuir Hill
September 21st 1850


My dear Mr McLean

I am delighted to hear that you think you will soon be able to come to Wellington. I hope nothing will again occur to prevent you. I heard last Sunday from Mrs Kirton that you had returned to Rangitikei. She also told me that it was likely you would be here this week. As I heard this I have been expecting every day to see you. On Tuesday evening I heard the gate open. I went out and I was sure it was you I saw coming up. I ran half way down the hill before I found I was mistaken. It was only some person bringing to Mr Kirton, who was dining with us, the plan of his house. I am glad you stay with Mr Duncan when at Manawatu for I am sure you must be comfortable there from what I have heard of Mrs Duncan. I think she must be a very fine person.

You say you heard that Miss Kelly was to have been married to Mr Robinson. I think that is nonsense. I was told so long ago but I never believed it was true. I never saw Mr Robinson, but from what I have heard of him I do not think he is a person I would have liked to have seen Miss Kelly marry. I am glad that you do not disapprove of knitting and crochet. I think a great many gentlemen dislike to see that kind of work. They say that it is waste of time. It is wrong to neglect work of more consequence for it but I think when everything else is done it is a nice amusement. I am doing just now an antimacassar for Mama. That is one of those things for the back of chairs. After that is done I am going to make a collar for Mrs Kirton but I think I must make your watch guard first, for if you come in and find it not done you will tease me dreadfully about it. Mrs Kirton and I have not gone to Evans Bay yet. We intend to wait till it is convenient for the minister to go with us. We are afraid to go without a gentleman as there are often wild cattle there and we are both great cowards. I am very fond of Mrs Kirton. She is such a warm hearted kind person. The longer I know her the more I like her.

I am afraid I must now conclude which I am most unwilling to do as I should like to continue writing to you but I have stupidly allowed the fire to go out and is very cold. I am sure also it must be late. Everybody is in bed and asleep but myself. I hope you will forgive me for writing such a short letter. I shall write a longer one by the next mail. Good night dearest and believe me to remain ever your affectionate


Susan Douglas Strang

Part of:
Inward and outward family correspondence - Susan McLean (wife), Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0826 (43 digitised items)
Series 9 Inwards family letters, Reference Number Series 9 Inwards family letters (1204 digitised items)
McLean Papers, Reference Number MS-Group-1551 (30238 digitised items)

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