Object #1027339 from MS-Papers-0032-0658

2 pages written 27 Nov 1868 by George Tovey Buckland Worgan in Clyde to Sir Donald McLean

From: Inward letters - George B Worgan, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0658 (95 digitised items). 93 letters and memos written from Wairoa, Napier and Wanganui, 1864-1873. Includes piece-level inventory of letters accessioned pre-1969.

A transcription/translation of this document (by ATL) appears below.

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English (ATL)

'Clyde'
Nov. 27th 68.


Dear Sir,

We are literally stript bare of nativee by the advance. I had difficulty in getting a messenger to forward your dispatches Hamlin went to Te Apatu's and got a Horse, and we had afterwards to apply to the Major for a man. I ought certainly to have a few natives available for like purposes -- Lambert makes difficulties about everything, especially trifles which if of no other dis--service is to say the least very annoying -- the ''Mohaka'' people have not yet arrived -- they will be the only men proourable. From the description sent by Westrupp and the information given by Archdeacon Williams I have been able to gather pretty accurate knowledge of the whereabouts of the enemy, the old men here who know the country say that the probable retreat of the enemy will not be to ''Puketapu'' but to a place

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English (ATL)

more to the north and east farther from here out nearer to 'Turanga' called 'Puke tatara men' -- they recognised the position now occupied by the enemy as an old fighting ground upon which they had encountered the 'Whaka tohea' long ago -- I strongly urged Preece to keep the Force up to the mark and promised that no pains should be spared to forward supplies. My reason for applying for rations for the women left behind was to leave no excuse to the men for returning or shirking their duty on the plea of their families being in want I must say it would be much more satisfactory if the entire charge of the natives were taken from the Major who yields with so had a grace, that it is worse than not yielding at all -- the Govt: is put to the same expence and does not get the credit which it is so desirable they should do. Please to consider this matter --

I beg to remain, Dear Sir,
Your most obedt. servt.
Geo. B. Worgan
His Honor D. McLean Esq.

English (ATL)

'Clyde'
Nov. 27th 68.


Dear Sir,

We are literally stript bare of nativee by the advance. I had difficulty in getting a messenger to forward your dispatches Hamlin went to Te Apatu's and got a Horse, and we had afterwards to apply to the Major for a man. I ought certainly to have a few natives available for like purposes -- Lambert makes difficulties about everything, especially trifles which if of no other dis--service is to say the least very annoying -- the ''Mohaka'' people have not yet arrived -- they will be the only men proourable. From the description sent by Westrupp and the information given by Archdeacon Williams I have been able to gather pretty accurate knowledge of the whereabouts of the enemy, the old men here who know the country say that the probable retreat of the enemy will not be to ''Puketapu'' but to a place more to the north and east farther from here out nearer to 'Turanga' called 'Puke tatara men' -- they recognised the position now occupied by the enemy as an old fighting ground upon which they had encountered the 'Whaka tohea' long ago -- I strongly urged Preece to keep the Force up to the mark and promised that no pains should be spared to forward supplies. My reason for applying for rations for the women left behind was to leave no excuse to the men for returning or shirking their duty on the plea of their families being in want I must say it would be much more satisfactory if the entire charge of the natives were taken from the Major who yields with so had a grace, that it is worse than not yielding at all -- the Govt: is put to the same expence and does not get the credit which it is so desirable they should do. Please to consider this matter --

I beg to remain, Dear Sir,
Your most obedt. servt.
Geo. B. Worgan
His Honor D. McLean Esq.

Part of:
Inward letters - George B Worgan, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0658 (95 digitised items)
Series 1 Inward letters (English), Reference Number Series 1 Inward letters (English) (14501 digitised items)
McLean Papers, Reference Number MS-Group-1551 (30238 digitised items)

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