Object #1027119 from MS-Papers-0032-0228

4 pages written 14 May 1862 by George Sisson Cooper in Woodlands to Sir Donald McLean

From: Inward letters - George Sisson Cooper, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0228 (108 digitised items). 105 letters written from Taranaki, Hawke's Bay & Wellington. Contains correspondence between McLean and Cooper with regard to the purchase of Maori land in Hawke's Bay and Wairarapa in particular, and various complaints and issues that arose from the purchases; also contains information and discussions about the spread of the Pai Marire and Ringatu religions (again, with a particular focus on Hawke's Bay and Wairarapa), and about general Maori affairs. Includes draft letters from McLean to Cooper; letters from George's wife Ellen C Cooper, 1863-1872, and from Sarah Cooper (undated).

A transcription/translation of this document (by ATL) appears below.

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Page 1 of 4. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

Woodlands
May 14th 1862


My dear McLean

I am very anxious indeed to hear what is to be done about the land near Hampden that the Manawatu Natives want to get. They are a troublesome and scheming lot, and I am afraid of getting into some difficulty. What I fear is that they are trying to get hold of 200 acres, on the pretended understanding that they will pay the purchase money afterwards; and then they will stick to the land, and set up a claim of their own against the Govt. for their share of lands on which they had a claim and which were sold by their relatives here while they were at Manawatu. I went over yesterday with FitzGerald, Reihana, and some of the natives, and I succeeded after some difficulty in showing

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English (ATL)

them that they could not have the town which was what they at first wanted - We then went to a place called Pukehou and after considerable discussion we found 4 sections that would suit them, Nos. 21, 22, 31 and 32 on the map. They wanted these pointed out at once, but this I would not do, and put them off for the present, by saying the Tikokino work was not yet finished. My reason for not doing it then was that I knew they wd. consider pointing out the boundaries as putting them in possession, and to this I saw two objections - 1stly The dangerof their never paying, as I have already pointed out - and 2ndly I do not know whether we can get the land for them or not. By the time I can receive an answer from you to this, the Tikokino work will be finished, and then if I do not hear from you I do not see how I can escape showing them the boundaries. I most earnestly beg

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English (ATL)

therefore that you will see Cap.Carter on this subject and write to me on Monday. I think the easiest way to manage will be to pay them the amount of purchase money of these sections, as compensation for their claims to all lands heretofore sold at Heretaunga. They are a very nasty set of fellows, and may - nay I am sure they will - give a good deal of trouble, if we can't settle with them now. Hapuku has promised to pay for a part of the land and he certainly ought to do so, if he can raise the money (which is doubtful)

The Tikokino work is getting on - I heard from Tiffen yesterday saying that he had reserved the sections I asked for. I fixed upon the 200 acres this morning, and left FitzGerald to commence cutting the bush lines. I hope the snoney will be done by Saturday - then pointing out the boundaries on Monday will finish up the

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English (ATL)

work there. I should like to hear when you are likely to be at Poukawa - there will be several subjects to be gone into there.

I enclose a Maori letter that was sent here for you.


Yours very sincerely
G. S. Cooper

English (ATL)

Woodlands
May 14th 1862


My dear McLean

I am very anxious indeed to hear what is to be done about the land near Hampden that the Manawatu Natives want to get. They are a troublesome and scheming lot, and I am afraid of getting into some difficulty. What I fear is that they are trying to get hold of 200 acres, on the pretended understanding that they will pay the purchase money afterwards; and then they will stick to the land, and set up a claim of their own against the Govt. for their share of lands on which they had a claim and which were sold by their relatives here while they were at Manawatu. I went over yesterday with FitzGerald, Reihana, and some of the natives, and I succeeded after some difficulty in showing them that they could not have the town which was what they at first wanted - We then went to a place called Pukehou and after considerable discussion we found 4 sections that would suit them, Nos. 21, 22, 31 and 32 on the map. They wanted these pointed out at once, but this I would not do, and put them off for the present, by saying the Tikokino work was not yet finished. My reason for not doing it then was that I knew they wd. consider pointing out the boundaries as putting them in possession, and to this I saw two objections - 1stly The dangerof their never paying, as I have already pointed out - and 2ndly I do not know whether we can get the land for them or not. By the time I can receive an answer from you to this, the Tikokino work will be finished, and then if I do not hear from you I do not see how I can escape showing them the boundaries. I most earnestly beg therefore that you will see Cap.Carter on this subject and write to me on Monday. I think the easiest way to manage will be to pay them the amount of purchase money of these sections, as compensation for their claims to all lands heretofore sold at Heretaunga. They are a very nasty set of fellows, and may - nay I am sure they will - give a good deal of trouble, if we can't settle with them now. Hapuku has promised to pay for a part of the land and he certainly ought to do so, if he can raise the money (which is doubtful)

The Tikokino work is getting on - I heard from Tiffen yesterday saying that he had reserved the sections I asked for. I fixed upon the 200 acres this morning, and left FitzGerald to commence cutting the bush lines. I hope the snoney will be done by Saturday - then pointing out the boundaries on Monday will finish up the work there. I should like to hear when you are likely to be at Poukawa - there will be several subjects to be gone into there.

I enclose a Maori letter that was sent here for you.


Yours very sincerely
G. S. Cooper

Part of:
Inward letters - George Sisson Cooper, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0228 (108 digitised items)
Series 1 Inward letters (English), Reference Number Series 1 Inward letters (English) (14501 digitised items)
McLean Papers, Reference Number MS-Group-1551 (30238 digitised items)

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