Object #1027106 from MS-Papers-0032-0312

4 pages written 11 May 1851 by Henry Halse in New Plymouth District to Sir Donald McLean

From: Inward letters - Henry Halse, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0312 (49 digitised items). 43 letters written from New Plymouth and Huatoki. Includes copies of letters from Wiremu Kingi, Witi, and Aperahama, Te Kani, 1851

A transcription/translation of this document (by ATL) appears below.

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Page 1 of 4. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

PRIVATE New Plymouth

May 11th. 1851.



Dear Sir,

The "Brig" called here this morning for our Representative, and brought your packet dated 14th. April, which I was right glad to receive; and to hear that your sojourn in the wilderness is fast drawing to a close. What a long spell you have had! Why, it is now more than twelve months since you left us; and I am certain that many here have given you up altogether. Tho old Judge, and Mrs. Stafford, landed from the Brig, and paid the Parsonage a visit. He told my frater that the Governor had finally taken up his abode at Wellington. What will the Auckland people do with themselves after this? And where is your home to be? Surely you will be snugly planted very soon. I observe several changes. For instance, Major Durie, R.M. at Whanganui. Dillon, Commissioner of Crown Lands at Nelson. F.D. Bell the like appointment at Wellington. Cooper with the Governor at Wellington, as before; and others of no immediate interest to either of us.

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English (ATL)


In reference to Stewart's removal to Government House. He has stated to me that the reason he did so, was the coldness of his sleeping apartment in the Barracks. But I was neither informed of this complaint, nor of his application, until he had received the Resident Magistrate's permission to change his quarters.

In case you still contemplate an alteration in the present Force, I should recommend Paneta Rahiri, of Puketapu, as a proper person to be enrolled in the Force. He has been living in Barracks with Hakopa for a considerable time, and I have always found him ready to give assistance. He is frequently with Hakopa when on duty, and I think his appointment by you would be a gratifying recognition of his voluntary services, and at the same time, a useful addition to the Force.

As the current year expires on the 18th. of next month, I send the following rough outline for your consideration.

Eight men at £65 amounts to £520.

An increase in numbers being required

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English (ATL)

for the public good, suppose the sum allowed, is disposed of thus:-

Rawiri 32 Honi 32 Hakopa 32 Taumati Waka 20 Taumata 20 Te Ngahuru 20 Cook 65 (Should be included in Harbour Dept.) Heale 65 (an old Servant and a large family, most of them getting their own living.) Medland 50 Stewart 50 Newsham 32 418 102 balance for disposal £500 sum allowed. Paneta 32 Tahana 20 European 50 suggested appropriation of balance.

The Report for last fortnight is scanty; but the fact is I have been entirely taken up with small native cases, which do not appear, because scarcely worth entering, although they take time to arrange.

Toheroa's letter, I think, means nothing; and for the good he has done here, it would have been better if he had remained away. At first he promised well, but somehow

Page 4 of 4. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

or other, all the absentee visitors here leave their polish behind, and return to "te anua tikanga", i.e., as far as land is concerned.

Charles Brown was married to Margaret J. Horn on the 1st. and all the world, by polite invitation, visited the bride on the 8th. 9th. and 10th. inst.

Mr. Wilson's house is advertised for sale, owing, it is said, to a refractory neighbour.

Miss Wickstead has taken the cottage for twelve months, with a right of purchase within that period, and is now in possession.

My wife, I am happy to say, is well; and frequently asks when you are coming back, a question I have difficulty in answering. As to our boy, he is a prodigy of limbs and lungs, and should properly be present at the Exhibition for general inspection. It is generally considered he will run away a little before his time; is a great scamp; thrashes his mother; kicks his father and promises well to lick the nation at a future day.

Hoping you are well, and that this will reach you somewhat sooner than the preeceeding one,

I remain
very faithfully yours (Signed)
H. Halse.
To:- D. McLean Esq.

English (ATL)

PRIVATE New Plymouth

May 11th. 1851.



Dear Sir,

The "Brig" called here this morning for our Representative, and brought your packet dated 14th. April, which I was right glad to receive; and to hear that your sojourn in the wilderness is fast drawing to a close. What a long spell you have had! Why, it is now more than twelve months since you left us; and I am certain that many here have given you up altogether. Tho old Judge, and Mrs. Stafford, landed from the Brig, and paid the Parsonage a visit. He told my frater that the Governor had finally taken up his abode at Wellington. What will the Auckland people do with themselves after this? And where is your home to be? Surely you will be snugly planted very soon. I observe several changes. For instance, Major Durie, R.M. at Whanganui. Dillon, Commissioner of Crown Lands at Nelson. F.D. Bell the like appointment at Wellington. Cooper with the Governor at Wellington, as before; and others of no immediate interest to either of us.

In reference to Stewart's removal to Government House. He has stated to me that the reason he did so, was the coldness of his sleeping apartment in the Barracks. But I was neither informed of this complaint, nor of his application, until he had received the Resident Magistrate's permission to change his quarters.

In case you still contemplate an alteration in the present Force, I should recommend Paneta Rahiri, of Puketapu, as a proper person to be enrolled in the Force. He has been living in Barracks with Hakopa for a considerable time, and I have always found him ready to give assistance. He is frequently with Hakopa when on duty, and I think his appointment by you would be a gratifying recognition of his voluntary services, and at the same time, a useful addition to the Force.

As the current year expires on the 18th. of next month, I send the following rough outline for your consideration.

Eight men at £65 amounts to £520.

An increase in numbers being required for the public good, suppose the sum allowed, is disposed of thus:-

Rawiri 32 Honi 32 Hakopa 32 Taumati Waka 20 Taumata 20 Te Ngahuru 20 Cook 65 (Should be included in Harbour Dept.) Heale 65 (an old Servant and a large family, most of them getting their own living.) Medland 50 Stewart 50 Newsham 32 418 102 balance for disposal £500 sum allowed. Paneta 32 Tahana 20 European 50 suggested appropriation of balance.

The Report for last fortnight is scanty; but the fact is I have been entirely taken up with small native cases, which do not appear, because scarcely worth entering, although they take time to arrange.

Toheroa's letter, I think, means nothing; and for the good he has done here, it would have been better if he had remained away. At first he promised well, but somehow or other, all the absentee visitors here leave their polish behind, and return to "te anua tikanga", i.e., as far as land is concerned.

Charles Brown was married to Margaret J. Horn on the 1st. and all the world, by polite invitation, visited the bride on the 8th. 9th. and 10th. inst.

Mr. Wilson's house is advertised for sale, owing, it is said, to a refractory neighbour.

Miss Wickstead has taken the cottage for twelve months, with a right of purchase within that period, and is now in possession.

My wife, I am happy to say, is well; and frequently asks when you are coming back, a question I have difficulty in answering. As to our boy, he is a prodigy of limbs and lungs, and should properly be present at the Exhibition for general inspection. It is generally considered he will run away a little before his time; is a great scamp; thrashes his mother; kicks his father and promises well to lick the nation at a future day.

Hoping you are well, and that this will reach you somewhat sooner than the preeceeding one,

I remain
very faithfully yours (Signed)
H. Halse.
To:- D. McLean Esq.

Part of:
Inward letters - Henry Halse, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0312 (49 digitised items)
Series 1 Inward letters (English), Reference Number Series 1 Inward letters (English) (14501 digitised items)
McLean Papers, Reference Number MS-Group-1551 (30238 digitised items)

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