Object #1026878 from MS-Papers-0032-0231

4 pages written 11 Apr 1847 by W E Cormack in Auckland Region to Sir Donald McLean

From: Inward letters - W E Cormack, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0231 (11 digitised items). 11 letters and memos written from Auckland & Taranaki, 1844-1849; London, Aug 1850. Memo dated 16 Jul 1844 re land at Waipa and Waikato

A transcription/translation of this document (by ATL) appears below.

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Page 1 of 4. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

Auckland,

11th April, 1847.


Donald McLean Esquire.
My dear Sir,

It gave me much pleasure here two days since to receive your letter of the 15th Ultimo; and please accept of my best thanks for your information respecting the Mill wright and Mill stones. The Mill wright whom I have at present employed here will I think conclude the works he has undertaken - that is to finish one Mill: therefore be so good as to say to Mr. Richard Randle - that at a future time I may be glad to avail myself of his services - and in the mean time thank him for the tender. The Mill stones I may very probably require some by and by, of which I will take the liberty to give you due notice. For the Mill which I am putting up now - in payment to Natives for dragging out my spars - I have purchased French Burr stones - because I could get no other kind. Nearly all the able bodied men of Coromandel Harbor are hauling out spars for me at Wangapona in payment for the Mill. Wangapona you may remember lies N.E. from Cor. Har. and North of Mercury Bay on the East Coast.

I rejoice to think that our Maori brethren will be kept under at an enormous expence to Government. The time was when things could have been better managed otherwise. But let us get all the money now we can from misrule and crown humbug. I cannot think that New Zealand will - for many years be a desirable place for respectable emigrants.

From my Waipa claims, I do not expect ever to derive much if any good. The interference of Government has put a stop to that enterprise that once existed to stock the country with herds and flocks - Te "Waru", at

Page 2 of 4. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

Kawhia and Rangiafia, my chief, and principal seller, knows that I will complete all payments whenever I can do so, without the apprehension of being deprived of all the benefits to arise therefrom by - the Queen. Te "Waru" and "Pungarehu" are the chief men who I understand preserve the Tapu over my claims My Piako Claim, in spite of the stupid opposition of the learned Mr.Preece of the grub minded Edward Shortland - and of the high spirited "creeping Jesus" was recommended by Commissioner Godfrey for confirmation by the Government 'subject to survey'. By the way we notice that the said Colonel Godfrey late of New Zealand has been before one of the Courts in London for swindling. You must see the cruel villainy in this adjunct to the recommendation, - in its being more difficult to collect these monsters of covetousness to perform an act from which there is nothing to be gained - than to collect them at the Commissioners Court itself - to which some incomprehensible authority forces them.

Mr.Brown has recently returned to Auckland direct from London. Doctor Martin was in the bosom of his friends in a spot in a valley in a mountain in the Isle of Sky: He may have forgotten New Zealand.

I think Captain Grey has a head that does not require the senate to come forward to govern him. I have great confidence in him.

My game at Colonial Politics shall in future be played at Home or not at all.

A Brother of McCaskill's has come out to join him. I have not seen him. Halls and Mrs.H. have gone Home, without intimation to their friends: they did right - Kaipara is

Page 3 of 4. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

about being abandoned by Spar Makers - Auckland flourishes under Govt.Expenditure; - so will Wellington under its Lieut. Governor.


My dear McLean, I remain, Yours vy.sy.
W. E. Cormack.

English (ATL)

Auckland,

11th April, 1847.


Donald McLean Esquire.
My dear Sir,

It gave me much pleasure here two days since to receive your letter of the 15th Ultimo; and please accept of my best thanks for your information respecting the Mill wright and Mill stones. The Mill wright whom I have at present employed here will I think conclude the works he has undertaken - that is to finish one Mill: therefore be so good as to say to Mr. Richard Randle - that at a future time I may be glad to avail myself of his services - and in the mean time thank him for the tender. The Mill stones I may very probably require some by and by, of which I will take the liberty to give you due notice. For the Mill which I am putting up now - in payment to Natives for dragging out my spars - I have purchased French Burr stones - because I could get no other kind. Nearly all the able bodied men of Coromandel Harbor are hauling out spars for me at Wangapona in payment for the Mill. Wangapona you may remember lies N.E. from Cor. Har. and North of Mercury Bay on the East Coast.

I rejoice to think that our Maori brethren will be kept under at an enormous expence to Government. The time was when things could have been better managed otherwise. But let us get all the money now we can from misrule and crown humbug. I cannot think that New Zealand will - for many years be a desirable place for respectable emigrants.

From my Waipa claims, I do not expect ever to derive much if any good. The interference of Government has put a stop to that enterprise that once existed to stock the country with herds and flocks - Te "Waru", at Kawhia and Rangiafia, my chief, and principal seller, knows that I will complete all payments whenever I can do so, without the apprehension of being deprived of all the benefits to arise therefrom by - the Queen. Te "Waru" and "Pungarehu" are the chief men who I understand preserve the Tapu over my claims My Piako Claim, in spite of the stupid opposition of the learned Mr.Preece of the grub minded Edward Shortland - and of the high spirited "creeping Jesus" was recommended by Commissioner Godfrey for confirmation by the Government 'subject to survey'. By the way we notice that the said Colonel Godfrey late of New Zealand has been before one of the Courts in London for swindling. You must see the cruel villainy in this adjunct to the recommendation, - in its being more difficult to collect these monsters of covetousness to perform an act from which there is nothing to be gained - than to collect them at the Commissioners Court itself - to which some incomprehensible authority forces them.

Mr.Brown has recently returned to Auckland direct from London. Doctor Martin was in the bosom of his friends in a spot in a valley in a mountain in the Isle of Sky: He may have forgotten New Zealand.

I think Captain Grey has a head that does not require the senate to come forward to govern him. I have great confidence in him.

My game at Colonial Politics shall in future be played at Home or not at all.

A Brother of McCaskill's has come out to join him. I have not seen him. Halls and Mrs.H. have gone Home, without intimation to their friends: they did right - Kaipara is about being abandoned by Spar Makers - Auckland flourishes under Govt.Expenditure; - so will Wellington under its Lieut. Governor.


My dear McLean, I remain, Yours vy.sy.
W. E. Cormack.

Part of:
Inward letters - W E Cormack, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0231 (11 digitised items)
Series 1 Inward letters (English), Reference Number Series 1 Inward letters (English) (14501 digitised items)
McLean Papers, Reference Number MS-Group-1551 (30238 digitised items)

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