Object #1026861 from MS-Papers-0032-0826

4 pages written 7 Sep 1850 by Susan Douglas McLean in Wellington to Sir Donald McLean

From: Inward and outward family correspondence - Susan McLean (wife), Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0826 (43 digitised items). Mainly letters between Susan Strang and her future husband Donald McLean. Includes a letter from her mother Susannah Strang to McLean, 1849; letter from E Shand to Susan Strang, written from Portobello, 1850 in which she gives her impressions of Dunedin

A transcription/translation of this document (by MD) appears below.

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English (MD)

Dalmuir Hill
September 7th 1850


My dear Mr McLean

I have just time before I go to bed to write a few lines. I intended to have written a long letter to you today but I have been busy finishing a pair of cuffs which I have been knitting for Mama and which I wished her to wear tomorrow so I hope you will forgive me for writing a short letter. Although I did not expect to hear from you this week still I cannot help feeling the want of a letter. I have been so accustomed to have one by every mail. I hope however that I shall have a letter next Friday, if I do not I shall lose all patience with the natives and their boundaries or whatever it is that deprives me of the pleasure of hearing from

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English (MD)

you. I had a long letter from Mrs Shand a fortnight ago. She likes Otago very much. She says that the weather there has been like what we have in the month of October in Wellington but without the high winds. The only thing which finds disagreeable is the situation of her house. When Mr Shand went to Otago he found that Mr Macarthy's house was too small for their family so he was obliged to take one on the opposite side of the river. Mrs Shand says that this is most unpleasant as it is some times very rough and it takes an hour to go across to the Customhouse. Mrs Shand desires me to give you her kind regards and say that your letter was delivered in safety.

In your last letter you say that you admire the conduct of a Prince when before his tribunal. I suppose you allude to Irgranus, son of the king of Armenia, who with his wife was taken prisoner by Cyrus. He was asked by Cyrus what he would give for the ransom of his wife. He replied

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English (MD)

"a thousand lives if he had them". He and the Prince received their liberty. When on their way home Irgranus asked his wife what she thought of Cyrus. She replied that she had taken no notice of him. She had only seen him who said he would give a thousand lives for her liberty. You say that the conduct of this Prince would be an excellent moral for imitation. It is very unlikely that our affection will ever be put to a test like this, but there are many other ways in which it might be tried. I am sure there are no trials or sufferings which I would not undergo for your sake and if your affection is as sincere as mine I am sure you would do the same.

You ask me when I was at Mrs Kirton's. I have not called there for a fortnight. She called a few days ago and I promised to go with her next week to Evans Bay. Mr Kirton is going to

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English (MD)

have a house built near Mr Wallace's. It is a very nice situation being so near the church. I am glad they are going to live so near us. We shall be able to see them more frequently. Mama is much better. She has almost got rid of her cough. I forgot to ask her before she went to bed if she had any message for you.

I must now conclude my letter which I hope you will be able to read for I have written it in a great hurry as it is very late. Good night dearest


And believe me to remain
Ever your affectionate
Susan D Strang

English (MD)

Dalmuir Hill
September 7th 1850


My dear Mr McLean

I have just time before I go to bed to write a few lines. I intended to have written a long letter to you today but I have been busy finishing a pair of cuffs which I have been knitting for Mama and which I wished her to wear tomorrow so I hope you will forgive me for writing a short letter. Although I did not expect to hear from you this week still I cannot help feeling the want of a letter. I have been so accustomed to have one by every mail. I hope however that I shall have a letter next Friday, if I do not I shall lose all patience with the natives and their boundaries or whatever it is that deprives me of the pleasure of hearing from you. I had a long letter from Mrs Shand a fortnight ago. She likes Otago very much. She says that the weather there has been like what we have in the month of October in Wellington but without the high winds. The only thing which finds disagreeable is the situation of her house. When Mr Shand went to Otago he found that Mr Macarthy's house was too small for their family so he was obliged to take one on the opposite side of the river. Mrs Shand says that this is most unpleasant as it is some times very rough and it takes an hour to go across to the Customhouse. Mrs Shand desires me to give you her kind regards and say that your letter was delivered in safety.

In your last letter you say that you admire the conduct of a Prince when before his tribunal. I suppose you allude to Irgranus, son of the king of Armenia, who with his wife was taken prisoner by Cyrus. He was asked by Cyrus what he would give for the ransom of his wife. He replied "a thousand lives if he had them". He and the Prince received their liberty. When on their way home Irgranus asked his wife what she thought of Cyrus. She replied that she had taken no notice of him. She had only seen him who said he would give a thousand lives for her liberty. You say that the conduct of this Prince would be an excellent moral for imitation. It is very unlikely that our affection will ever be put to a test like this, but there are many other ways in which it might be tried. I am sure there are no trials or sufferings which I would not undergo for your sake and if your affection is as sincere as mine I am sure you would do the same.

You ask me when I was at Mrs Kirton's. I have not called there for a fortnight. She called a few days ago and I promised to go with her next week to Evans Bay. Mr Kirton is going to have a house built near Mr Wallace's. It is a very nice situation being so near the church. I am glad they are going to live so near us. We shall be able to see them more frequently. Mama is much better. She has almost got rid of her cough. I forgot to ask her before she went to bed if she had any message for you.

I must now conclude my letter which I hope you will be able to read for I have written it in a great hurry as it is very late. Good night dearest


And believe me to remain
Ever your affectionate
Susan D Strang

Part of:
Inward and outward family correspondence - Susan McLean (wife), Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0826 (43 digitised items)
Series 9 Inwards family letters, Reference Number Series 9 Inwards family letters (1204 digitised items)
McLean Papers, Reference Number MS-Group-1551 (30238 digitised items)

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