Object #1026307 from MS-Papers-0032-0374

3 pages written 26 May 1851 by Henry King in New Plymouth District to Sir Donald McLean

From: Inward letters - Henry King, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0374 (73 digitised items). 71 letters written from Taranaki - Police Office, Brooklands & New Plymouth

A transcription/translation of this document (by ATL) appears below.

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English (ATL)

New Plymouth

May 26th. 1851.



Dear Maclean,

Your letter, dated 14th. April, was not so satisfactory as I had anticipated; fully expecting you would have returned immediately to Taranaki to resime your general duties. But it appears your services are estimated at a higher value in another quarter. You are aware that our popoualtion amounts to about 1600. This number of British subjects must be fully entitled to the attention of our rulers. The generality of our settlers are under the impression that we are neglected, or that we do not receive our due proportion of the requisite paternal care to ensure our prosperity. We are unfortunately deficient

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English (ATL)

in a harbour; but this does not operate so much to injure the settlement as the want of land, which appears to be the only obstacle to our advancement; and we cannot perceive that necessary exertions are used to obtain so desirable an object. He has sent up his son Henry, with an assessor from Wellington, to persuade and deter the natives from disposing of their land. I fear the kind treatment shewn to many of the Chiefs of influence, tends in a strong degree, to excite their cupidty, and to destroy the good intended. All here are well, but we have lost many excellent and desirable settlers, for want of land. Can you strain a point, and come up without delay, and use your best exertions with the natives, to relieve us from the "slough of despond."

The cattle have been rather troublesome at Tartarai, or, more properly speaking, getting into trouble at Kaiihi. Honi has been unwell, and laid up for some time; of course unable to look after the herd so well in consequence, and they frequently stray. Some have even got across the stream; and on Friday last, the natives seized one of the cows, and fastened it up with a rope, under the pretence that it had eaten their Carraccas. Willy applied for it, but they refused to restore her. I don't know how it may end; but I suppose Thos. Williams will settle it. You have no doubt heard that C. Brown is married to Miss Horn, the younger; and I wish you could have seen with what solemnity I performed the

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English (ATL)

ceremony. Cutfield left us about a fortnight since, to make one at the General Council. I hope he will acquit himself as he ought, and not run his head against a post.

Our town is increasing in buildings; so that if you do not make haste and retyrn, you will scarcely recognise it.

Dr. Wilson is near me. He says he will not write, because you are sure to be here next week. All I can say is, I wish it may be so. Mrs. King and Willy are quite well, and desire kind remembrances.

I remain, D. McLean
Yours truly (Signed)
Henry King.
To:- D. McLean. Esq.

English (ATL)

New Plymouth

May 26th. 1851.



Dear Maclean,

Your letter, dated 14th. April, was not so satisfactory as I had anticipated; fully expecting you would have returned immediately to Taranaki to resime your general duties. But it appears your services are estimated at a higher value in another quarter. You are aware that our popoualtion amounts to about 1600. This number of British subjects must be fully entitled to the attention of our rulers. The generality of our settlers are under the impression that we are neglected, or that we do not receive our due proportion of the requisite paternal care to ensure our prosperity. We are unfortunately deficient in a harbour; but this does not operate so much to injure the settlement as the want of land, which appears to be the only obstacle to our advancement; and we cannot perceive that necessary exertions are used to obtain so desirable an object. He has sent up his son Henry, with an assessor from Wellington, to persuade and deter the natives from disposing of their land. I fear the kind treatment shewn to many of the Chiefs of influence, tends in a strong degree, to excite their cupidty, and to destroy the good intended. All here are well, but we have lost many excellent and desirable settlers, for want of land. Can you strain a point, and come up without delay, and use your best exertions with the natives, to relieve us from the "slough of despond."

The cattle have been rather troublesome at Tartarai, or, more properly speaking, getting into trouble at Kaiihi. Honi has been unwell, and laid up for some time; of course unable to look after the herd so well in consequence, and they frequently stray. Some have even got across the stream; and on Friday last, the natives seized one of the cows, and fastened it up with a rope, under the pretence that it had eaten their Carraccas. Willy applied for it, but they refused to restore her. I don't know how it may end; but I suppose Thos. Williams will settle it. You have no doubt heard that C. Brown is married to Miss Horn, the younger; and I wish you could have seen with what solemnity I performed the ceremony. Cutfield left us about a fortnight since, to make one at the General Council. I hope he will acquit himself as he ought, and not run his head against a post.

Our town is increasing in buildings; so that if you do not make haste and retyrn, you will scarcely recognise it.

Dr. Wilson is near me. He says he will not write, because you are sure to be here next week. All I can say is, I wish it may be so. Mrs. King and Willy are quite well, and desire kind remembrances.

I remain, D. McLean
Yours truly (Signed)
Henry King.
To:- D. McLean. Esq.

Part of:
Inward letters - Henry King, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0374 (73 digitised items)
Series 1 Inward letters (English), Reference Number Series 1 Inward letters (English) (14501 digitised items)
McLean Papers, Reference Number MS-Group-1551 (30238 digitised items)

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