Object #1025775 from MS-Papers-0032-0818

4 pages written 11 Apr 1872 by Archibald John McLean in Glenorchy to Sir Donald McLean

From: Inward family correspondence - Archibald John McLean (brother), Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0818 (112 digitised items). Letters written from Maraekakaho, Warleigh, Doonside and Glenorchy about station matters and family news.Letter dated 24 Oct 1874 recounts the McLean family's lineage and gives dates of birth for family members

A transcription/translation of this document (by MD) appears below.

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English (MD)

29 Sep 1872

Glenorchy

My dear Donald

I was glade to receive the Blue Book with all the speeches including your own. Altho the Herald keeps us pritty well posted up in those matters we do not get the whole guist of the debates so well. I was quite prepared for a change of government but I was not prepared to see your part of it changed. We had no idia here but that you would still keep at the head of Native Affairs. Most all people of both races that I have come in intercourse with since the change took place very must deplore the state of things and they all say if you are not shure

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English (MD)

of your party turning Stafford out that you should join him to look after your own department before the country takes fire again and God knows where it may stope. The Stafford party have made you all the overtures as far as we can see they could and it would be a very great pity if all that has been done is to be lost now by your standing alloff [aloof]. I am certain it will pray heavey on you to be out of office. You will be like a fish out of water seeing things going different to your views and cannot healp it. I can only say for my part that I never believed in some of the publick work scheme particularly in the way the emigration part was carryed out & the railway also & I am concerned two thirds of the people here were of the same oppinion and always

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English (MD)

said so that it was a piety that part of the policy was carryed out with so little tact and want of judgement. Of course I write you this knowing you are the best judge of which is best to be done but mind you without you have very strong grounds of belief in your party I consider it a very grave loss to yourself and the country the part you have taken and hope and trust you will weigh the matter well before you through [throw] the we[l]fair of the country away for any peek [pique] you could have against Stafford. There is no doubt but Stafford is a clever man and most people thing [think] him & you ought to pull together better even than Fox. Fox did you more harm at one time than Stafford ever did. I again must say that I know the great harm the want of office will do you when you lost the East Coast appointment.

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English (MD)

Your very looks grieved me to the heart as I partly new your state of mind. You felt you could do good but lacked proper authority to carry it out. It will be the same now and if you do not take a trip home or to Australia depend upon it you will feel very unhappy so that I beg of you as your brother to well weigh matters before the chances close and a new staff of native doctors rise up to undo all your toil for years. I heard from dear Douglas from Akitio and I am very glade indeed he is there and hope he will come here also at the shearing. I now must end. With every good wish for you & our sisters at Wellington and remain


Your affectionate brother
Archibald John McLean

English (MD)

29 Sep 1872

Glenorchy

My dear Donald

I was glade to receive the Blue Book with all the speeches including your own. Altho the Herald keeps us pritty well posted up in those matters we do not get the whole guist of the debates so well. I was quite prepared for a change of government but I was not prepared to see your part of it changed. We had no idia here but that you would still keep at the head of Native Affairs. Most all people of both races that I have come in intercourse with since the change took place very must deplore the state of things and they all say if you are not shure of your party turning Stafford out that you should join him to look after your own department before the country takes fire again and God knows where it may stope. The Stafford party have made you all the overtures as far as we can see they could and it would be a very great pity if all that has been done is to be lost now by your standing alloff [aloof]. I am certain it will pray heavey on you to be out of office. You will be like a fish out of water seeing things going different to your views and cannot healp it. I can only say for my part that I never believed in some of the publick work scheme particularly in the way the emigration part was carryed out & the railway also & I am concerned two thirds of the people here were of the same oppinion and always said so that it was a piety that part of the policy was carryed out with so little tact and want of judgement. Of course I write you this knowing you are the best judge of which is best to be done but mind you without you have very strong grounds of belief in your party I consider it a very grave loss to yourself and the country the part you have taken and hope and trust you will weigh the matter well before you through [throw] the we[l]fair of the country away for any peek [pique] you could have against Stafford. There is no doubt but Stafford is a clever man and most people thing [think] him & you ought to pull together better even than Fox. Fox did you more harm at one time than Stafford ever did. I again must say that I know the great harm the want of office will do you when you lost the East Coast appointment. Your very looks grieved me to the heart as I partly new your state of mind. You felt you could do good but lacked proper authority to carry it out. It will be the same now and if you do not take a trip home or to Australia depend upon it you will feel very unhappy so that I beg of you as your brother to well weigh matters before the chances close and a new staff of native doctors rise up to undo all your toil for years. I heard from dear Douglas from Akitio and I am very glade indeed he is there and hope he will come here also at the shearing. I now must end. With every good wish for you & our sisters at Wellington and remain


Your affectionate brother
Archibald John McLean

Part of:
Inward family correspondence - Archibald John McLean (brother), Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0818 (112 digitised items)
Series 9 Inwards family letters, Reference Number Series 9 Inwards family letters (1204 digitised items)
McLean Papers, Reference Number MS-Group-1551 (30238 digitised items)

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