Object #1025533 from MS-Papers-0032-0312

12 pages written 2 Feb 1852 by Henry Halse in New Plymouth District

From: Inward letters - Henry Halse, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0312 (49 digitised items). 43 letters written from New Plymouth and Huatoki. Includes copies of letters from Wiremu Kingi, Witi, and Aperahama, Te Kani, 1851

A transcription/translation of this document (by ATL) appears below.

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Page 1 of 12. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

New Plymouth

2 Feby. 1852.



Dear Sir,

You will see from report the chance of the natives consenting to a road through the country between Omata and Tataraimaka and will know what to think about it. Of course it would be a great point gained to get it as far as Oakura thereby

Page 2 of 12. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

avoiding a rough impracticable beach for carts or other means of conveyance.

Gutfield says Parengi Kingi was not asked to look after the cattle nor was any agreement entered into subsequent to 25th. May 1851, it being decided that the cattle should be removed as soon as possible. On the other hand Te Ngahuru, who is likely enough at the bottom of the whole

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English (ATL)

affair, says, "true, no agreement was made after the time mentioned but the maki tiaki continued without any objection from Kato, therefore he thinks the money has been earned and should be paid" - here then the question rests for further inquiry and I could wish the everlasting source of annoyance far away - the fact is, Tatara is altogether

Page 4 of 12. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

too small for the purpose and straying north and south is the consequence. The best precautions are thrown away and the only wonder is that Outfield still allows himself to be bothered with the business. When I was there the week before last I went over the greater portion of the block and got on commanding situations still I could not see

Page 5 of 12. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

more than ten head of cattle out of the whole herd. I may have missed a few but where were the rest?

Another thing to, that superlative savage Nopera has stated his intention to hold a portion of the last purchase made there, called I think the Wairoa - he and others cultivated the spot alluded to some time

Page 6 of 12. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

back but Te Ngahuru tells me all are willing; to give it up save Mr. Nopera who labours under the delusion that he can sieze upon any portion of Tatara with impunity.

The Morgans selected the Wairoa and talk of applying for possession which is my reason for preparing you in the event of a reference and enclosing rough tracing - perhaps a letter

Page 7 of 12. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

would settle the question at all events it would deprive the natives of all excuse after the present crops are gathered should they again cultivate it.

The Morgans particularly wish to lay it down in grass for cattle owing to the little fencing required from corner to corner.

No news from Rawiri or Honi Ropiha indeed I have not seen them

Page 8 of 12. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

lately therefore presume they have none for me to communicate. Is it not time some good fruits were seen from them in consideration for the annual expenditure of £130? Rawiri was put on Govt. pay in Ap. 1847 and Hone Ropiha in Aug. 1848 both at £65 per annum. At a rough guess they have received £550 and yet we seem as far from getting land as we ever were - that

Page 9 of 12. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

they have proved useful in preserving order I well know and that duty may be considered sufficient, still the sum is large for a native whose wants are few and inexpensive therefore it seems but reasonable that they should at least assist Government in getting possession of unused and unrequired wilds north of the Waiwakaiho - so far from doing anything

Page 10 of 12. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

of the kind I dont believe they give themselves any concern about it and think of little save their own private affairs.

Abstracts for the men will be forwarded by next opportunity unless otherwise ordered.

Not having heard from you in reference to the Barracks I presume I am to go on as usual and therefore enclose

English (ATL)

New Plymouth

2 Feby. 1852.



Dear Sir,

You will see from report the chance of the natives consenting to a road through the country between Omata and Tataraimaka and will know what to think about it. Of course it would be a great point gained to get it as far as Oakura thereby avoiding a rough impracticable beach for carts or other means of conveyance.

Gutfield says Parengi Kingi was not asked to look after the cattle nor was any agreement entered into subsequent to 25th. May 1851, it being decided that the cattle should be removed as soon as possible. On the other hand Te Ngahuru, who is likely enough at the bottom of the whole affair, says, "true, no agreement was made after the time mentioned but the maki tiaki continued without any objection from Kato, therefore he thinks the money has been earned and should be paid" - here then the question rests for further inquiry and I could wish the everlasting source of annoyance far away - the fact is, Tatara is altogether too small for the purpose and straying north and south is the consequence. The best precautions are thrown away and the only wonder is that Outfield still allows himself to be bothered with the business. When I was there the week before last I went over the greater portion of the block and got on commanding situations still I could not see more than ten head of cattle out of the whole herd. I may have missed a few but where were the rest?

Another thing to, that superlative savage Nopera has stated his intention to hold a portion of the last purchase made there, called I think the Wairoa - he and others cultivated the spot alluded to some time back but Te Ngahuru tells me all are willing; to give it up save Mr. Nopera who labours under the delusion that he can sieze upon any portion of Tatara with impunity.

The Morgans selected the Wairoa and talk of applying for possession which is my reason for preparing you in the event of a reference and enclosing rough tracing - perhaps a letter would settle the question at all events it would deprive the natives of all excuse after the present crops are gathered should they again cultivate it.

The Morgans particularly wish to lay it down in grass for cattle owing to the little fencing required from corner to corner.

No news from Rawiri or Honi Ropiha indeed I have not seen them lately therefore presume they have none for me to communicate. Is it not time some good fruits were seen from them in consideration for the annual expenditure of £130? Rawiri was put on Govt. pay in Ap. 1847 and Hone Ropiha in Aug. 1848 both at £65 per annum. At a rough guess they have received £550 and yet we seem as far from getting land as we ever were - that they have proved useful in preserving order I well know and that duty may be considered sufficient, still the sum is large for a native whose wants are few and inexpensive therefore it seems but reasonable that they should at least assist Government in getting possession of unused and unrequired wilds north of the Waiwakaiho - so far from doing anything of the kind I dont believe they give themselves any concern about it and think of little save their own private affairs.

Abstracts for the men will be forwarded by next opportunity unless otherwise ordered.

Not having heard from you in reference to the Barracks I presume I am to go on as usual and therefore enclose the Abstracts for your signature and the Authority which I suppose will be the estimates for the years.

We have had wretched weather for harvest and it is feared the farmers most of whom are heavily mortgaged will suffer considerably.

Hoping Mrs. McLean is well believe me


Sincerely yours,
H. Halse.

Part of:
Inward letters - Henry Halse, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0312 (49 digitised items)
Series 1 Inward letters (English), Reference Number Series 1 Inward letters (English) (14501 digitised items)
McLean Papers, Reference Number MS-Group-1551 (30238 digitised items)

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