Object #1025043 from MS-Papers-0032-0817

5 pages written 1852 by Archibald John McLean in Maraekakaho to Sir Donald McLean

From: Inward family correspondence - Archibald John McLean (brother), Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0817 (65 digitised items). Letters written on board ship or from various ports, 1847-1858 prior to his arrival in New Zealand in mid-1858. From then on the letters are almost all written from Maraekakaho about station matters.

A transcription/translation of this document (by MD) appears below.

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English (MD)

14 February 1859

Maraekakaho

My dear brother

I wrote a long letter to you the other day but as I know your anxiety about this place I write you a few lines to acknowledge the receipt of the boxes sugar and tea. The sugar just cost with the freight and expences seven pence before it came here and we could have got sugar here for five pence. However no matter, it is

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English (MD)

done now. Neil has arrived with the three rams all safe here and the three Spanish fowls are safe at Mr Smith's. He told me you wanted to send some blue gum trees by him. It is to soon in the season and besides I find that it is only waste of money to send them in plants as they have proved a complet failure in this districk that way besides the seed is for the c[h]eapest and Mr Roy who was here has faithfully promised to send me from his place at The Hut some of the puce seed per Capt Kenedy in the Wonga so that may save you a few pounds and the trouble. I got some accasia seed and sweet brier seed from Capt Hinton's place. The accasia makes fine trees and grow very quick. I got 8 blue gum plants from Mr Oliver and only two of them lived after all my care and trouble. June and July is the season for

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English (MD)

transplanting trees and I hope you will be her yourself before that time till you will pass your oppinion on the principal place for improvements. The man Neil you sent the rams with appears to be a very steady man and I think the man that would answer on a station very well as a man to fence and plow and work with me at all such improvements and he would take all his wages in

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English (MD)

sheep. I think that if you would take it into consideration such a man as that is far before a parcel of boys as there keep and cloths come to more than a good man's wages. I mearly mention this to you as I am certain you would agree with me if you were here as this place must go ahead and we must steady the proper men to make it go ahead and one

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English (MD)

good man is much wanted allong with me. Alex is at Titiacura settling and dilivering over that place and I am busy laying the floor for good in the woolshed. Every thing is doing very well here and please God next year I hope you will have at least 50 bales of wool when all this year's lambs is shorn. My dear brother if everything goes well in a year or two you can visit your native land depending on the returns of your run and sheep. Depend upon my being here will in place of being a burden on you prove a profit to you by increasing your property in value by improvements and care with my brother's Alex assistance. If you are coming down please bring down a Guinea cock and hen as the one you sent the cock got killed by the dogs and the poor fowl is fretiful without her mate. With love to all I remain


Your affectionate brother
Archibald John McLean

English (MD)

14 February 1859

Maraekakaho

My dear brother

I wrote a long letter to you the other day but as I know your anxiety about this place I write you a few lines to acknowledge the receipt of the boxes sugar and tea. The sugar just cost with the freight and expences seven pence before it came here and we could have got sugar here for five pence. However no matter, it is done now. Neil has arrived with the three rams all safe here and the three Spanish fowls are safe at Mr Smith's. He told me you wanted to send some blue gum trees by him. It is to soon in the season and besides I find that it is only waste of money to send them in plants as they have proved a complet failure in this districk that way besides the seed is for the c[h]eapest and Mr Roy who was here has faithfully promised to send me from his place at The Hut some of the puce seed per Capt Kenedy in the Wonga so that may save you a few pounds and the trouble. I got some accasia seed and sweet brier seed from Capt Hinton's place. The accasia makes fine trees and grow very quick. I got 8 blue gum plants from Mr Oliver and only two of them lived after all my care and trouble. June and July is the season for transplanting trees and I hope you will be her yourself before that time till you will pass your oppinion on the principal place for improvements. The man Neil you sent the rams with appears to be a very steady man and I think the man that would answer on a station very well as a man to fence and plow and work with me at all such improvements and he would take all his wages in sheep. I think that if you would take it into consideration such a man as that is far before a parcel of boys as there keep and cloths come to more than a good man's wages. I mearly mention this to you as I am certain you would agree with me if you were here as this place must go ahead and we must steady the proper men to make it go ahead and one good man is much wanted allong with me. Alex is at Titiacura settling and dilivering over that place and I am busy laying the floor for good in the woolshed. Every thing is doing very well here and please God next year I hope you will have at least 50 bales of wool when all this year's lambs is shorn. My dear brother if everything goes well in a year or two you can visit your native land depending on the returns of your run and sheep. Depend upon my being here will in place of being a burden on you prove a profit to you by increasing your property in value by improvements and care with my brother's Alex assistance. If you are coming down please bring down a Guinea cock and hen as the one you sent the cock got killed by the dogs and the poor fowl is fretiful without her mate. With love to all I remain


Your affectionate brother
Archibald John McLean

Part of:
Inward family correspondence - Archibald John McLean (brother), Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0817 (65 digitised items)
Series 9 Inwards family letters, Reference Number Series 9 Inwards family letters (1204 digitised items)
McLean Papers, Reference Number MS-Group-1551 (30238 digitised items)

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