Object #1025010 from MS-Papers-0032-0656

4 pages written 21 Mar 1853 by Rev William Woon in New Plymouth District to Sir Donald McLean in Auckland Region

From: Inward letters - William Woon, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0656 (28 digitised items). 28 letters (including two draft replies from McLean). Letters written from Taranaki, Wanganui and Waimate, 1846-1858

A transcription/translation of this document (by ATL) appears below.

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Page 1 of 4. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

N. Plymouth,
March 21, 1853.


My dear Friend,

On Saturday last I received a letter from Mr. Watkin, stating that you had overtaken him on the road, and informed him that his Excellency Sir. G. Grey intended conferring the Interpretership on Richard, the first intimation of the kind I have received on the subject, and for which I am greatly obliged to His Excellency. The same day brought a letter from Auckland, with power of attorney to bind R. an apprentice to Mr. Waterhouse in Hobart Town and I believe he has sailed for that port. But not willing to lose such an excellent offer for my son, I have recommended Edwin to His Excellency, who is a better maori linguist, and with whom you are acquainted. We have conversed with our mutual friend Dr. Wilson on the subject, and he advised us to send E. forthwith to Wellington. He will accordingly start on the 23rd. inst. I had written to Sir G. Grey and to yourself to Wellington.

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English (ATL)

Mr. Cooper called today and informed me that the Bishop, the Governor, and yourself had left for Auckland by the east coast, and being anxious to secure the situation I have thought it best to write again and send by the mail which leaves tomorrow. I am sure you will do your best for the lad.

Messrs. Duncan and Yerns have just returned from Whanganui by our old premises. There have been very heavy gales lately and they report that they ate in ruins. The bishop held a long conversation with the Ngatiruanui and saw their spirit during his late visit, recommending them to give 50 acres to the Society for a new house, etc. But have they? "Ku.Kore". They acknowledged that his lordship's views and mine corresponded, especially about whakawakanga, and I feel thankful that ray views eorrespond with his in such matters.

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English (ATL)

I was at Whanganui while he was near Waimate. Returning home I slept at Manawapou and he at Waiohoi, one night, within three miles of each other! Old Tamati Raukaua was at the Bishop's confirmation and would be whakapad --- a pokanoa of his --- which the bishop acknowledged.

The people here have had a good harvest compared with former years, but still there is a good deal of grumbling When will the Taranakians be content?

That is a sad case of Colenso's. What is man? We corresponded when we were in the north.

What a wild goose chase too was Pelechet's! Mrs. P. confined in the bush after all, and her father arrived after all was over! They are still here.

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English (ATL)


I am very sorry that that extract from my letter was inserted in the "Taranaki Herald" in Oct. last from the tone Crompton assumed at that time towards the natives but the present editor is not so severe --- and tho' the paper is not what I could wish, I hope it will do well, though people I learn would like to have it all their own way. In politics, colonial matters, etc. my son cannot please everybody, and is often placed in similar circumstances to "The old man and his ass".

Hoping you are well. With our united kind regards,
Yours affec.
Willm. Woon.

English (ATL)

N. Plymouth,
March 21, 1853.


My dear Friend,

On Saturday last I received a letter from Mr. Watkin, stating that you had overtaken him on the road, and informed him that his Excellency Sir. G. Grey intended conferring the Interpretership on Richard, the first intimation of the kind I have received on the subject, and for which I am greatly obliged to His Excellency. The same day brought a letter from Auckland, with power of attorney to bind R. an apprentice to Mr. Waterhouse in Hobart Town and I believe he has sailed for that port. But not willing to lose such an excellent offer for my son, I have recommended Edwin to His Excellency, who is a better maori linguist, and with whom you are acquainted. We have conversed with our mutual friend Dr. Wilson on the subject, and he advised us to send E. forthwith to Wellington. He will accordingly start on the 23rd. inst. I had written to Sir G. Grey and to yourself to Wellington. Mr. Cooper called today and informed me that the Bishop, the Governor, and yourself had left for Auckland by the east coast, and being anxious to secure the situation I have thought it best to write again and send by the mail which leaves tomorrow. I am sure you will do your best for the lad.

Messrs. Duncan and Yerns have just returned from Whanganui by our old premises. There have been very heavy gales lately and they report that they ate in ruins. The bishop held a long conversation with the Ngatiruanui and saw their spirit during his late visit, recommending them to give 50 acres to the Society for a new house, etc. But have they? "Ku.Kore". They acknowledged that his lordship's views and mine corresponded, especially about whakawakanga, and I feel thankful that ray views eorrespond with his in such matters. I was at Whanganui while he was near Waimate. Returning home I slept at Manawapou and he at Waiohoi, one night, within three miles of each other! Old Tamati Raukaua was at the Bishop's confirmation and would be whakapad --- a pokanoa of his --- which the bishop acknowledged.

The people here have had a good harvest compared with former years, but still there is a good deal of grumbling When will the Taranakians be content?

That is a sad case of Colenso's. What is man? We corresponded when we were in the north.

What a wild goose chase too was Pelechet's! Mrs. P. confined in the bush after all, and her father arrived after all was over! They are still here.

I am very sorry that that extract from my letter was inserted in the "Taranaki Herald" in Oct. last from the tone Crompton assumed at that time towards the natives but the present editor is not so severe --- and tho' the paper is not what I could wish, I hope it will do well, though people I learn would like to have it all their own way. In politics, colonial matters, etc. my son cannot please everybody, and is often placed in similar circumstances to "The old man and his ass".

Hoping you are well. With our united kind regards,
Yours affec.
Willm. Woon.

Part of:
Inward letters - William Woon, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0656 (28 digitised items)
Series 1 Inward letters (English), Reference Number Series 1 Inward letters (English) (14501 digitised items)
McLean Papers, Reference Number MS-Group-1551 (30238 digitised items)

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