Object #1024951 from MS-Papers-0032-0540

3 pages written 13 Sep 1852 by John Rogan

From: Inward letters - John Rogan, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0540 (40 digitised items). 40 letters written from Awakino, Mokau, New Plymouth, Takatuhi, Whangaroa, Waingohu, Tokatoka (Kaipara), Whakaturai, Auckland, Coromandel, & Sydney (Sep 1858)

A transcription/translation of this document (by ATL) appears below.

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English (ATL)

Mr. Cooper.

The Mokau offer has assumed a very different hue since your departure South. The Kaka's party have, from time to time, gradually withdrawn patches of land from the Block; telling me they intended retaining these as Reserves. I think their present feeling is to oppose the sale of land belonging to those in the district; more from a spirit of opposition to Te Watihi and Tu Kerei, than a disinclination to part with their land. This is to be regretted, because the banks of the river, inland to the coal district, belongs principally to these people. It is, however, impossible for me to say with certainty what their real intentions are. Indeed, I don't think they know themselves. When Mr. C. comes, a general meeting will take place at Mokau; at which it is probable some of the natives in the Interior will figure; when something like an opinion may be arrived at. One peculiarity of character I have discovered in the man of Mokau; which much resembles the Feegee Islander, namely,- the people making false statements, even when the truth would answer his purpose better.

A native of Petone, a great landed proprietor, has gone to Ruakaka, for the purpose of inducing his friends to join him in selling their land. The Kaka is daily expected from Motukaramu; where he has been for some time, discussing the important subject. I hope to be able to give you a favourable account of these traitors soon.

The only real disappointment to me here, is detention by the natives. Sufficient time has already elapsed, to have completed the sketch of the Exterior boundary. But you know the difficulty of enticing a native from his garden. The locality is little known by the natives generally; except the thoroughfare to the Interior; and they look upon it as no easy task to traverse a few miles of country unknown to them.

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English (ATL)


This delay has, however, one great advantage. The people will have time to consider well the subject; and as Ta Kerei remarked to me, the boundary may be decided inland when Mr. Cooper's Committee takes place.

Letters have been received from the Pakare, unfavourable to the sale of land; accompanied by a letter to Ta Kerei, from Mr. Whitely; copies of which I send you. These documents have no effect on the people of this settlement.(Maniaroa.)

Mr. Schnackenberg; whose assistance is most valuable here, tells me a jealousy between the two Chiefs exists; because letters are written by you to Ta Kerei only. A note from you to the Kaka might purchase the Coal Mines. You have secured the one; and it is no difficult matter to take the other.


I remain, my dear Sir, Yours very truly,
(Signed) John Rogan.

English (ATL)

Letter from John Rogan, dated 13th. September 1852.

COPY. Monday
13th. September 1852.


My dear Sir,

I deferred writing, with a view to give you some information from the Interior; but as yet nothing has been heard beyond a mere rumour that the natives generally are averse to dispose of land. Ka Kirei and his people willingly consented to extend the Northern boundary of the Block within about 2 miles of Waikawau, running inland to the source of the Wanganui river; which falls into the Awakino. But they decline accompanying me over these boundaries till they have completed fencing, planting, etc.; which will extend over a period of some months. I should have left for town a fortnight since; but Ka Karei positively refused to let me till I heard from Mr. Cooper.

The Mokau offer has assumed a very different hue since your departure South. The Kaka's party have, from time to time, gradually withdrawn patches of land from the Block; telling me they intended retaining these as Reserves. I think their present feeling is to oppose the sale of land belonging to those in the district; more from a spirit of opposition to Te Watihi and Tu Kerei, than a disinclination to part with their land. This is to be regretted, because the banks of the river, inland to the coal district, belongs principally to these people. It is, however, impossible for me to say with certainty what their real intentions are. Indeed, I don't think they know themselves. When Mr. C. comes, a general meeting will take place at Mokau; at which it is probable some of the natives in the Interior will figure; when something like an opinion may be arrived at. One peculiarity of character I have discovered in the man of Mokau; which much resembles the Feegee Islander, namely,- the people making false statements, even when the truth would answer his purpose better.

A native of Petone, a great landed proprietor, has gone to Ruakaka, for the purpose of inducing his friends to join him in selling their land. The Kaka is daily expected from Motukaramu; where he has been for some time, discussing the important subject. I hope to be able to give you a favourable account of these traitors soon.

The only real disappointment to me here, is detention by the natives. Sufficient time has already elapsed, to have completed the sketch of the Exterior boundary. But you know the difficulty of enticing a native from his garden. The locality is little known by the natives generally; except the thoroughfare to the Interior; and they look upon it as no easy task to traverse a few miles of country unknown to them.

This delay has, however, one great advantage. The people will have time to consider well the subject; and as Ta Kerei remarked to me, the boundary may be decided inland when Mr. Cooper's Committee takes place.

Letters have been received from the Pakare, unfavourable to the sale of land; accompanied by a letter to Ta Kerei, from Mr. Whitely; copies of which I send you. These documents have no effect on the people of this settlement.(Maniaroa.)

Mr. Schnackenberg; whose assistance is most valuable here, tells me a jealousy between the two Chiefs exists; because letters are written by you to Ta Kerei only. A note from you to the Kaka might purchase the Coal Mines. You have secured the one; and it is no difficult matter to take the other.


I remain, my dear Sir, Yours very truly,
(Signed) John Rogan.

Part of:
Inward letters - John Rogan, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0540 (40 digitised items)
Series 1 Inward letters (English), Reference Number Series 1 Inward letters (English) (14501 digitised items)
McLean Papers, Reference Number MS-Group-1551 (30238 digitised items)

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