Object #1024802 from MS-Papers-0032-0311

4 pages written 14 Oct 1850 by Henry Halse in New Plymouth District to Sir Donald McLean

From: Inward letters - Henry Halse, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0311 (35 digitised items). 36 letters and memos written from Wanganui, Wellington and Auckland (some in Maori)

A transcription/translation of this document (by ATL) appears below.

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Page 1 of 4. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

PRIVATE New Plymouth

14th. October 1850.



Dear Sir,

The story of the "Mariner" was abort and sweet. She anchored on Friday, and nothing was done till yesterday, (Sunday) morning, when she was discharged, relieved of about 28 passengers, and sailed for China. May she proeper!

I have been too busy writing to England, to have a peep at the newcomers; but, if able, will introduce them in my next.

I found it useless to ask any of the assessors to go and make common cause with me in E Waka's business. He keeps out of the way; but none but an Australian has any chance of finding him. Unintentional, no doubt. So I held a consultation with myself, and spun him a yarn, submitted to Honi Ropiha's inferior judgement, and dispatched my

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English (ATL)

trusty man Hakopa with all due haste to the rebellious object of my fatherly care.

My messenger returned at dusk, after a long, fatiguing search, encountering on his way the fury of the elements, with more kicks than halfpence, in ascendand descending the rugged, though beautiful country; and brought me glad tidings. E Waka was pleased to say he would abandon his occupation of the land in question, after the removal of the crops already in the ground; and honour me with a visit on the following Saturday. But I suppose the tupiki blew him away, for he never appeared. At present the matter remains in obeyance. No opportunity, however, will he neglected, to bring the business to a final settlement.

Chillman narrowly escaped trouble. However, the affair is settled, I will let it alone.

Raniera and his party behaved badly; and it is really wonderful, that such mistakes are not met in a different manner by the settlers. They, however, pursue a wise course, and pocket insult on insult, till they are well-nigh weary. You must know Raniera, so says Hakopa, defied

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English (ATL)

the Police, but that is a common occurrence, and therefore I think nothing of it.

This day will be devoted to a searching enquiry into the case of wandering cattle. From information gathered, it seems difficult to be of any other opinion, that the shot was fired either by Greenwood, or the man living with him. Johnson asked Mrs. Greenwood (her husband being absent) whether she had a gun in the house. She replied "Yes, plenty." "Will you let me see them?" said he. "I don't where to find them," was her reply. Johnson stated that the man, Michael Connor, a discharged soldier, walked from the house, as he and Hakopa appeared. Poharama and others wish no time lose in the matter; and they have no idea of waiting the usual time given by our law. I expect this business will polish me up a little; but I do hope the madman will be brought to justice. There is a slight hope of discovering the first case of shooting, which I reported to you.

The next business is to lay out the boundary of the Waimakaiho Reserve, joining S. Matthews' land; about which I expect no difficulty;

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English (ATL)

then to Billing's section somewhere hear Mr. Harris's; where natives are said to be encroaching. More of this in my next.

Difficulty still stands in the way of getting the board. The sawyers will not undertake the labour of the cutting up of a large tree for one board. The only course left is to give them an order for at least 500 feet. Then the board can be out out in the regular process of work. Now I have no use for timber. What am I to do? Under any circumstances, without offering an extravagant price. I could not get the board within three weeks of this time. The size is unusual, and you will remember there is just a chance of the tree being rotten In the centre, which would only permit of small stuff. Sawyers know this, and will not undertake the work. Moreover, their hands are full with orders, and unless an inducement is offered, they will not leave their work. I am in a fix.

Hoping you are well, and thinking of returning to your old quarters.

I remain
dear Sir, Yours sincerely (Signed)
H. Halse.
To:- D. McLean. Esq.

English (ATL)

PRIVATE New Plymouth

14th. October 1850.



Dear Sir,

The story of the "Mariner" was abort and sweet. She anchored on Friday, and nothing was done till yesterday, (Sunday) morning, when she was discharged, relieved of about 28 passengers, and sailed for China. May she proeper!

I have been too busy writing to England, to have a peep at the newcomers; but, if able, will introduce them in my next.

I found it useless to ask any of the assessors to go and make common cause with me in E Waka's business. He keeps out of the way; but none but an Australian has any chance of finding him. Unintentional, no doubt. So I held a consultation with myself, and spun him a yarn, submitted to Honi Ropiha's inferior judgement, and dispatched my trusty man Hakopa with all due haste to the rebellious object of my fatherly care.

My messenger returned at dusk, after a long, fatiguing search, encountering on his way the fury of the elements, with more kicks than halfpence, in ascendand descending the rugged, though beautiful country; and brought me glad tidings. E Waka was pleased to say he would abandon his occupation of the land in question, after the removal of the crops already in the ground; and honour me with a visit on the following Saturday. But I suppose the tupiki blew him away, for he never appeared. At present the matter remains in obeyance. No opportunity, however, will he neglected, to bring the business to a final settlement.

Chillman narrowly escaped trouble. However, the affair is settled, I will let it alone.

Raniera and his party behaved badly; and it is really wonderful, that such mistakes are not met in a different manner by the settlers. They, however, pursue a wise course, and pocket insult on insult, till they are well-nigh weary. You must know Raniera, so says Hakopa, defied the Police, but that is a common occurrence, and therefore I think nothing of it.

This day will be devoted to a searching enquiry into the case of wandering cattle. From information gathered, it seems difficult to be of any other opinion, that the shot was fired either by Greenwood, or the man living with him. Johnson asked Mrs. Greenwood (her husband being absent) whether she had a gun in the house. She replied "Yes, plenty." "Will you let me see them?" said he. "I don't where to find them," was her reply. Johnson stated that the man, Michael Connor, a discharged soldier, walked from the house, as he and Hakopa appeared. Poharama and others wish no time lose in the matter; and they have no idea of waiting the usual time given by our law. I expect this business will polish me up a little; but I do hope the madman will be brought to justice. There is a slight hope of discovering the first case of shooting, which I reported to you.

The next business is to lay out the boundary of the Waimakaiho Reserve, joining S. Matthews' land; about which I expect no difficulty; then to Billing's section somewhere hear Mr. Harris's; where natives are said to be encroaching. More of this in my next.

Difficulty still stands in the way of getting the board. The sawyers will not undertake the labour of the cutting up of a large tree for one board. The only course left is to give them an order for at least 500 feet. Then the board can be out out in the regular process of work. Now I have no use for timber. What am I to do? Under any circumstances, without offering an extravagant price. I could not get the board within three weeks of this time. The size is unusual, and you will remember there is just a chance of the tree being rotten In the centre, which would only permit of small stuff. Sawyers know this, and will not undertake the work. Moreover, their hands are full with orders, and unless an inducement is offered, they will not leave their work. I am in a fix.

Hoping you are well, and thinking of returning to your old quarters.

I remain
dear Sir, Yours sincerely (Signed)
H. Halse.
To:- D. McLean. Esq.

Part of:
Inward letters - Henry Halse, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0311 (35 digitised items)
Series 1 Inward letters (English), Reference Number Series 1 Inward letters (English) (14501 digitised items)
McLean Papers, Reference Number MS-Group-1551 (30238 digitised items)

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