Object #1024566 from MS-Papers-0032-0185

3 pages written 28 May 1865 by Lady Harriet Louisa Gore Browne to Sir Donald McLean

From: Inward letters - Sir Thomas Gore Browne (Governor), Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0185 (71 digitised items). 67 letters, 1862-1873 & undated. Includes some letters from Harriet Gore Browne, and some drafts of letters from McLean

A transcription/translation of this document (by ATL) appears below.

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English (ATL)

May 28th. 1865.


My dear Mr. McLean,

I am really ashamed of bothering you with my business, when you have so much of your own both public and private to attend to, but Capt. Steward has just received an account of his sheep from Mr. Gollan at Hawkes Bay and it reminds me that I have heard nothing of Harold's (which you were

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English (ATL)

so very kind as to get for him) since the year before we left New Zealand. I hope they are thriving and that they have grown into a nice little flock by this time, and if you are so good as to write and tell me about them, I hope you will also tell me about yoursllf as we were very much distressed to see that you had been very ill, and knowing how serious your illnesses are we felt very uneasy. Mr. Ferard was here for some time and told us of you, he was very welcome as he both visited and was interested in New Zealand affairs. Is it not queer that just as the English House of Commons is triumphing over Mr. Weld's policy of sending the troops home, he should be fighting with the General about keeping them? You must have been very prudent to keep off hostilities at Hawkes Bay, I trust you may long continue to do so, but Pai Marire seems worse than any previous madness. Do you and the present ministry

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English (ATL)

agree? I have great confidence in Mr. Weld, he is such a true gentleman. We can hardly expect to have the visit we wish for from you, while you are in office, but it would be very pleasant to see you again and I can assure you Col. Browne and I often talk over the old scenes in which you were a prominent actor and we never forget what a true staunch friend you were. Pray mention Douglas when you write, Harold is a good gentle boy and rides like a man but is no great scholar. Miss Greenwood is coming back to us from Nelson which is a great comfort to me. How are Mrs. Curling and Mrs. Ormond? Tell them I asked for them, and believe me dear Mr. McLean,


Yours most sincerely,
H. Gore Browne.

English (ATL)

May 28th. 1865.


My dear Mr. McLean,

I am really ashamed of bothering you with my business, when you have so much of your own both public and private to attend to, but Capt. Steward has just received an account of his sheep from Mr. Gollan at Hawkes Bay and it reminds me that I have heard nothing of Harold's (which you were so very kind as to get for him) since the year before we left New Zealand. I hope they are thriving and that they have grown into a nice little flock by this time, and if you are so good as to write and tell me about them, I hope you will also tell me about yoursllf as we were very much distressed to see that you had been very ill, and knowing how serious your illnesses are we felt very uneasy. Mr. Ferard was here for some time and told us of you, he was very welcome as he both visited and was interested in New Zealand affairs. Is it not queer that just as the English House of Commons is triumphing over Mr. Weld's policy of sending the troops home, he should be fighting with the General about keeping them? You must have been very prudent to keep off hostilities at Hawkes Bay, I trust you may long continue to do so, but Pai Marire seems worse than any previous madness. Do you and the present ministry agree? I have great confidence in Mr. Weld, he is such a true gentleman. We can hardly expect to have the visit we wish for from you, while you are in office, but it would be very pleasant to see you again and I can assure you Col. Browne and I often talk over the old scenes in which you were a prominent actor and we never forget what a true staunch friend you were. Pray mention Douglas when you write, Harold is a good gentle boy and rides like a man but is no great scholar. Miss Greenwood is coming back to us from Nelson which is a great comfort to me. How are Mrs. Curling and Mrs. Ormond? Tell them I asked for them, and believe me dear Mr. McLean,


Yours most sincerely,
H. Gore Browne.

Part of:
Inward letters - Sir Thomas Gore Browne (Governor), Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0185 (71 digitised items)
Series 1 Inward letters (English), Reference Number Series 1 Inward letters (English) (14501 digitised items)
McLean Papers, Reference Number MS-Group-1551 (30238 digitised items)

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