Object #1024478 from MS-Papers-0032-0279

5 pages written 27 Oct 1870 by Sir William Fox in Westoe to Sir Donald McLean

From: Inward letters - Sir William Fox, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0279 (45 digitised items). 43 letters written by Fox from Wellington, Wanganui, Auckland, Grahamstown, Rangitikei, Marton, Dunedin, 1870-1871. Includes letter from Charles J Taylor to Fox, Feb 1870; Fox to Mete Kingi, 1870; incomplete letter to Fox (written from Patea, Mar 1870); Fox to Gisborne, Apr 1870; Fox to Gisborne (copy), May 1871; J Booth to Fox, Wanganui (copy), Apr 1871; McLean to Fox, 1871; Albert J Allen [?] to Fox, Aug 1871.

A transcription/translation of this document (by ATL) appears below.

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English (ATL)

Westoe,
27th Octr. 1870


My dear McLean,

I hear from Browne (per telegram) that you are coming up, but he does not say when. On my way here I stopped two or three days at Manawatu and went as far as Ngawakarau, about 15 miles inland to see what had been done on the roads by Stewart. Was very well satisfied, money well expended, nearly all Maori work, by contract taken very cheap, and carefully superintended by Amos Burns. One of the principal contracters was Kori te One who except that he opposes the decision of the Court is a very good and in

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English (ATL)

dustrious fellow. He told me that he had heard from you, but he was busy building his house and not inclined to go to Wellington tell "Kamutu te raruraru" - which I understood to mean till the land question was settled. I did not speak to him on that subject but talked to Stewart and Burns about it. Stewart thinks the cue of the dissentients is just to ignore the decision of the Court altogether and assert their rights as if it had never decided the case - not recognizing the surveys in any way and probably intending to resist occupation by purchasers from Govt. Burns says that Cole told him he knew he would have to give in, but he meant to have a little more talk about it, and he seemed to think that but for Travers and McDonald's late interference the opposition was nearly at an end, but that had stimulatedit, McDonald has been "on the spree" - had an argument with John Johnston M.L.C. and and afterwards got still more drunk and was galloping all over the Country on horseback without a hat to fight him. This is what I heard; I have no doubt it is true - as he constantly breaks out in that way. It is disgusting that the Colonization of the Country should be stopped and peace endangered by such a ruffian. I believe he would stop at nothing. His last move I hear has been to get the Natives to give notes to Swainson, Jordan, Traffords manager and

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English (ATL)

others of the lessees, to pay their rents (at the same rate as formerly) to him as Agent for the Native owners of the district, under a threat-that if they do not they will be driven off. How he lives nobody knows. He has a good house rent free from L. Daniell who is one of the lessees, which makes people imagine that Daniell and some of the squatters keep him, as they secure their runs while he keeps the Govt. out. He has also I hear got a lease of 2000 acres of the Orowa reserve (awarded by the Court to the Ngatiraukawas) and is building a house there. If you do come up you must excercise the utmost caution in respect to him, as he will misrepresent and twist to the Natives whatever you say.

The Orowa lot and those whom

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English (ATL)

McDonald directly influences, seem to me to be acting on their own book, independently of Ngawaka, Rawiti and the Karariki and Reu Reu lot, and these latter I believe have quarrelled with Te Hapi and ordered him off from their pa. He is now living at a kainga somewhere between Kakariki and Reu Reu, a little off the river as well as I can make out, and isolated from the others. He used to live chiefly at Orowa and latterly at Kakariki. He never come to our side of the river, as the others do. There is no doubt he was till a few months ago the Kings representative here - what he is now I don't know - but there is an evident change in his relations towards the others.

If you have not started before this reaches you, I should recommend your looking in-for a day or two at Manawatu. You could see

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English (ATL)

Burns there and if you chose go into Orowa before any body knew you were there. We shall have a room ready; but I should be glad to hear when you are coming, as I shall have to look up a horse that can carry weight for you.

I send a few mems. relating to matters in your departments, and have written to Gisborne who will no doubt shew you my note. George Swainson was found dead in his bed at Marton two nights ago, another melancholy victim to his own weakness. There is no other news.


Yours very faithfully
Wm. Fox.

English (ATL)

Westoe,
27th Octr. 1870


My dear McLean,

I hear from Browne (per telegram) that you are coming up, but he does not say when. On my way here I stopped two or three days at Manawatu and went as far as Ngawakarau, about 15 miles inland to see what had been done on the roads by Stewart. Was very well satisfied, money well expended, nearly all Maori work, by contract taken very cheap, and carefully superintended by Amos Burns. One of the principal contracters was Kori te One who except that he opposes the decision of the Court is a very good and industrious fellow. He told me that he had heard from you, but he was busy building his house and not inclined to go to Wellington tell "Kamutu te raruraru" - which I understood to mean till the land question was settled. I did not speak to him on that subject but talked to Stewart and Burns about it. Stewart thinks the cue of the dissentients is just to ignore the decision of the Court altogether and assert their rights as if it had never decided the case - not recognizing the surveys in any way and probably intending to resist occupation by purchasers from Govt. Burns says that Cole told him he knew he would have to give in, but he meant to have a little more talk about it, and he seemed to think that but for Travers and McDonald's late interference the opposition was nearly at an end, but that had stimulatedit, McDonald has been "on the spree" - had an argument with John Johnston M.L.C. and and afterwards got still more drunk and was galloping all over the Country on horseback without a hat to fight him. This is what I heard; I have no doubt it is true - as he constantly breaks out in that way. It is disgusting that the Colonization of the Country should be stopped and peace endangered by such a ruffian. I believe he would stop at nothing. His last move I hear has been to get the Natives to give notes to Swainson, Jordan, Traffords manager and others of the lessees, to pay their rents (at the same rate as formerly) to him as Agent for the Native owners of the district, under a threat-that if they do not they will be driven off. How he lives nobody knows. He has a good house rent free from L. Daniell who is one of the lessees, which makes people imagine that Daniell and some of the squatters keep him, as they secure their runs while he keeps the Govt. out. He has also I hear got a lease of 2000 acres of the Orowa reserve (awarded by the Court to the Ngatiraukawas) and is building a house there. If you do come up you must excercise the utmost caution in respect to him, as he will misrepresent and twist to the Natives whatever you say.

The Orowa lot and those whom McDonald directly influences, seem to me to be acting on their own book, independently of Ngawaka, Rawiti and the Karariki and Reu Reu lot, and these latter I believe have quarrelled with Te Hapi and ordered him off from their pa. He is now living at a kainga somewhere between Kakariki and Reu Reu, a little off the river as well as I can make out, and isolated from the others. He used to live chiefly at Orowa and latterly at Kakariki. He never come to our side of the river, as the others do. There is no doubt he was till a few months ago the Kings representative here - what he is now I don't know - but there is an evident change in his relations towards the others.

If you have not started before this reaches you, I should recommend your looking in-for a day or two at Manawatu. You could see Burns there and if you chose go into Orowa before any body knew you were there. We shall have a room ready; but I should be glad to hear when you are coming, as I shall have to look up a horse that can carry weight for you.

I send a few mems. relating to matters in your departments, and have written to Gisborne who will no doubt shew you my note. George Swainson was found dead in his bed at Marton two nights ago, another melancholy victim to his own weakness. There is no other news.


Yours very faithfully
Wm. Fox.

Part of:
Inward letters - Sir William Fox, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0279 (45 digitised items)
Series 1 Inward letters (English), Reference Number Series 1 Inward letters (English) (14501 digitised items)
McLean Papers, Reference Number MS-Group-1551 (30238 digitised items)

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