Object #1024416 from MS-Papers-0032-0024

6 pages written 6 Jan 1869 by Samuel Deighton in Wairoa

From: Superintendent, Hawkes Bay and Government Agent, East Coast - Correspondence, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0024 (106 digitised items). No Item Description

A transcription/translation of this document (by ATL) appears below.

Download alow-resolution PDF or high-resolution PDF

Page 1 of 6. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

Resident Magistrate's Office Wairoa

January 6th. 1869.



Sir,

In accordance with the wishes expressed in your letter of the 4th. inst., I beg to add the following information, respecting the expedition referred to by you.

The only Pa destroyed was Puketapu, the defences consisting of a breastwork and a quantity of brushwood laid down merely as a blind, rather than of any use as an actual defence. This, together with all the houses in the Pa, were destroyed by fire. The country in the vicinity of Puketapu and Pa Puni was also set fire to. At Pa Puni again three kaengas were burnt, consisting of a good many houses and a Church.

With regard to potatoes consumed, and quantities still remaining, I may state that at Orewha, we found large quantities, both growing, and in pits. Those in the pits were mostly

Page 2 of 6. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

consumed; what remained were burnt. The growing crops were mostly pulled up, and what were not eaten, were nearly all spoiled. The fence round the garden was also destroyed. There were only two or three houses which were left standing, as it was thought they might be made useful, if we returned home by that route. Upon leaving Orewha, we passed through very large cultivations, some 4 miles in extent, lining the road on each side. These we damaged as much as possible in our passage through; and some of our people returning by the same road, burnt, where ever they were able. In spite of all, however, large quantities of potatoes still remain in the ground; which it would take a body of men some considerable time to destroy effectually.

There are also some plantations between Orewha and Whataroa and its vicinity, but I am not aware of what extent.

Regarding the probable distances, and the nature of the country, I may state that the road we took on the way up from Marumaru to Orewha,

Page 3 of 6. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

was very bad, hilly, and I should think in winter time, impassable, or nearly so. From Oreha to Eirpete. also very hilly, and about seven or eight miles of bush; very bad for packing. From Eirpete to Puketapu, road again very bad, chiefly up the bed of the Ruakituri; which also would be impracticable in winter time; and even now quite impassable for horses or bullocks. (The road that Col. Whitmore took last winter was over the hills, and a long way round); distance about 10 miles. Pa Puni is close to Puketapu, being at the bottom of the hill on which the forner stands. Pakimi, the last kaenga, is about 3 miles from Pa Puni.

The road taken on our return by Te Tuki, was very much better, in every way, than that by Orewha. It is probably a little longer, but is open country the whole way; and the hills are neither so high, ot so steep as those on the Orewha line; and a much wider view of the surrounding country is to be obtained from the road. From the top of Te Tuki hill, you have a view of Orewha, Te Reinga, Eirpete, and the mouth of the Wairoa, the township and the country in the

Page 4 of 6. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

vicinity of Whataroa and Waikaremoana.

I now proceed to give you, as near as I am able, the relative distances from place to place, which, by following the accompanying rough sketch, as accurate an idea mat be formed, as can be obtained from personal observation, and information obtained from other quarters.

From town to Marumaru, about 12 miles, good road.

Marumaru to Orewha, 10 miles, hilly and rough, no bush.

Orewha to Eirpete, 11 miles, hilly and rough, and mostly bush.

Eripete to Puketapu, bed at river, rough boulders, 10 miles.

Puketapu to Pokimi, 3 miles.

Pokimi to Ngatapa, possibly about 20 miles; country appears rough, hilly and wooded.


I have the honour to be Sir, Your most obedient servant (Signed)
S. Deighton. R.M.

English (ATL)


COPY.
Resident Magistrate's Office Wairoa

January 6th. 1869.



Sir,

In accordance with the wishes expressed in your letter of the 4th. inst., I beg to add the following information, respecting the expedition referred to by you.

The only Pa destroyed was Puketapu, the defences consisting of a breastwork and a quantity of brushwood laid down merely as a blind, rather than of any use as an actual defence. This, together with all the houses in the Pa, were destroyed by fire. The country in the vicinity of Puketapu and Pa Puni was also set fire to. At Pa Puni again three kaengas were burnt, consisting of a good many houses and a Church.

With regard to potatoes consumed, and quantities still remaining, I may state that at Orewha, we found large quantities, both growing, and in pits. Those in the pits were mostly consumed; what remained were burnt. The growing crops were mostly pulled up, and what were not eaten, were nearly all spoiled. The fence round the garden was also destroyed. There were only two or three houses which were left standing, as it was thought they might be made useful, if we returned home by that route. Upon leaving Orewha, we passed through very large cultivations, some 4 miles in extent, lining the road on each side. These we damaged as much as possible in our passage through; and some of our people returning by the same road, burnt, where ever they were able. In spite of all, however, large quantities of potatoes still remain in the ground; which it would take a body of men some considerable time to destroy effectually.

There are also some plantations between Orewha and Whataroa and its vicinity, but I am not aware of what extent.

Regarding the probable distances, and the nature of the country, I may state that the road we took on the way up from Marumaru to Orewha, was very bad, hilly, and I should think in winter time, impassable, or nearly so. From Oreha to Eirpete. also very hilly, and about seven or eight miles of bush; very bad for packing. From Eirpete to Puketapu, road again very bad, chiefly up the bed of the Ruakituri; which also would be impracticable in winter time; and even now quite impassable for horses or bullocks. (The road that Col. Whitmore took last winter was over the hills, and a long way round); distance about 10 miles. Pa Puni is close to Puketapu, being at the bottom of the hill on which the forner stands. Pakimi, the last kaenga, is about 3 miles from Pa Puni.

The road taken on our return by Te Tuki, was very much better, in every way, than that by Orewha. It is probably a little longer, but is open country the whole way; and the hills are neither so high, ot so steep as those on the Orewha line; and a much wider view of the surrounding country is to be obtained from the road. From the top of Te Tuki hill, you have a view of Orewha, Te Reinga, Eirpete, and the mouth of the Wairoa, the township and the country in the vicinity of Whataroa and Waikaremoana.

I now proceed to give you, as near as I am able, the relative distances from place to place, which, by following the accompanying rough sketch, as accurate an idea mat be formed, as can be obtained from personal observation, and information obtained from other quarters.

From town to Marumaru, about 12 miles, good road.

Marumaru to Orewha, 10 miles, hilly and rough, no bush.

Orewha to Eirpete, 11 miles, hilly and rough, and mostly bush.

Eripete to Puketapu, bed at river, rough boulders, 10 miles.

Puketapu to Pokimi, 3 miles.

Pokimi to Ngatapa, possibly about 20 miles; country appears rough, hilly and wooded.


I have the honour to be Sir, Your most obedient servant (Signed)
S. Deighton. R.M.

Part of:
Superintendent, Hawkes Bay and Government Agent, East Coast - Correspondence, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0024 (106 digitised items)
Series 7 Official papers, Reference Number Series 7 Official papers (3737 digitised items)
McLean Papers, Reference Number MS-Group-1551 (30238 digitised items)

Usage: You can search, browse, print and download items from this website for research and personal study. You are welcome to reproduce the above image(s) on your blog or another website, but please maintain the integrity of the image (i.e. don't crop, recolour or overprint it), reproduce the image's caption information and link back to here (http://mp.natlib.govt.nz/detail/?id=1024416). If you would like to use the above image(s) in a different way (e.g. in a print publication), or use the transcription or translation, permission must be obtained. More information about copyright and usage can be found on the Copyright and Usage page of the NLNZ web site.

External Links:
View Full Descriptive Record in TAPUHI

Leave a comment

This function is coming soon.

Latest comments