Object #1024123 from MS-Papers-0032-0312

5 pages written 31 Mar 1851 by Henry Halse in Huatoki to Sir Donald McLean

From: Inward letters - Henry Halse, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0312 (49 digitised items). 43 letters written from New Plymouth and Huatoki. Includes copies of letters from Wiremu Kingi, Witi, and Aperahama, Te Kani, 1851

A transcription/translation of this document (by ATL) appears below.

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English (ATL)

PRIVATE. Huatoki

31st. March 1851



Dear Sir,

I had hoped the ship "Victory" would have been here ere this, and so filled up the blank in the scarcity of news here at the present time. But her length of absence leads us to infer that she has passed on to Wellington. She has passengers and good for this settlement, few of whom may now be expected.

It is rumoured that we are to have further additions to our native population, from the South, and the Chatham Islands. I hope incorrectly so, unless it is intended to make this altogether a native settlement. For my part, I would prefer living amongst them, to being thrown in the way of the worst vices of those of my own colour, who are infinitely below the scale of brute creation.

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English (ATL)


Some of your men have been taking advantage of your absence, - Medland, in particular, in leading good duty men astray, and I do hope you will inflict the highest penalty upon him in your power. On the 25th. inst. a change of landlords took place in this way. Charles Davy let his house to Hurst, and William George returned to his own. The consequence was both houses were numerously visited by all the riff-raff, and hardened drinkers in the place, many of whom were drunk at an early hour in the morning. I therefore particularly warned the men, vis:- Medland, Heals and Hakopa to be on the alert throughout; whereupon the former got drunk in the afternoon, and was totally unable to attend to his duty at the time appointed. It is quite useless, therefore, for me to expect any attention to orders from him; and the example may have

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English (ATL)

a very injurious effect with other members of the Force.

The arrangement made with Newsham, which at the time I thought well of, on trial, does not answer. With the exception of his weekly attendance at Barracks it is notorious that he does nothing but attend to his own private affairs. When living in town he was an efficient man, but ever since he went to Omata, I never could ascertain his utility as a Public Servant. It appears to me that the population of Omata should not be without some protective force, and if you can only station one man there, he should be disinterested in that locality; one of active habits, and his whole time devoted to the Service. At the same time I question whether, even then, one man would be found efficient; but since your Force is

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English (ATL)

altogether too small for the duties required in this settlement, it is useless to enter further into the question.

Our Town is improved since you left, in the shape of new buildings, and others in process of erection. Lakeman intends to apply for a licence; and the house is to be conducted by a man named Palmer, from Auckland.

Another attempt, headed by R.B. is being made, to establish a newspaper here, to be productive of great good or evil. We shall see.

Charles Horn intends to make Miss Margaret Horn his wife at the latter end of next month, and has taken Wilson's, the shoemaker's house, joining Thomas Heale's, for the honeymoon. Miss Horn proceeds to Wellington by first opportunity, for Wairarapa, as Governess to Mrs. Smith's children.

1/2 past 7 a.m.

A native has just come in from Puketapu; and reports that the "John Whitely" is on the rocks at Kawaroa. I have started

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English (ATL)

Hakopa with the necessary instructions, informed Mr. Leach, and sent Heale and Stewart to render all assistance in their power.

I have since heard that she struck at 12 o'clock last night, at which hour the wind was off the land, and is now a complete wreck. No lives lost. Goods being saved by Rawiri, Hakopa, Tamati Waka, Katatori, Parata, and indeed all the natives, men and women, in first-rate-style.

Liddel, his wife and two children, and Charlton were the passengers. The cargo appears to have consisted of wheat and sundries.

The boat left the Town at about 8 p.m., but the boatmen do not appear, from creditable witnesses, to be of any service, except to look on. The surf is too heavy for them.


Yours very faithfully (Signed)
H. Halse.
To:- Donald McLean Esq.

English (ATL)

PRIVATE. Huatoki

31st. March 1851



Dear Sir,

I had hoped the ship "Victory" would have been here ere this, and so filled up the blank in the scarcity of news here at the present time. But her length of absence leads us to infer that she has passed on to Wellington. She has passengers and good for this settlement, few of whom may now be expected.

It is rumoured that we are to have further additions to our native population, from the South, and the Chatham Islands. I hope incorrectly so, unless it is intended to make this altogether a native settlement. For my part, I would prefer living amongst them, to being thrown in the way of the worst vices of those of my own colour, who are infinitely below the scale of brute creation.

Some of your men have been taking advantage of your absence, - Medland, in particular, in leading good duty men astray, and I do hope you will inflict the highest penalty upon him in your power. On the 25th. inst. a change of landlords took place in this way. Charles Davy let his house to Hurst, and William George returned to his own. The consequence was both houses were numerously visited by all the riff-raff, and hardened drinkers in the place, many of whom were drunk at an early hour in the morning. I therefore particularly warned the men, vis:- Medland, Heals and Hakopa to be on the alert throughout; whereupon the former got drunk in the afternoon, and was totally unable to attend to his duty at the time appointed. It is quite useless, therefore, for me to expect any attention to orders from him; and the example may have a very injurious effect with other members of the Force.

The arrangement made with Newsham, which at the time I thought well of, on trial, does not answer. With the exception of his weekly attendance at Barracks it is notorious that he does nothing but attend to his own private affairs. When living in town he was an efficient man, but ever since he went to Omata, I never could ascertain his utility as a Public Servant. It appears to me that the population of Omata should not be without some protective force, and if you can only station one man there, he should be disinterested in that locality; one of active habits, and his whole time devoted to the Service. At the same time I question whether, even then, one man would be found efficient; but since your Force is altogether too small for the duties required in this settlement, it is useless to enter further into the question.

Our Town is improved since you left, in the shape of new buildings, and others in process of erection. Lakeman intends to apply for a licence; and the house is to be conducted by a man named Palmer, from Auckland.

Another attempt, headed by R.B. is being made, to establish a newspaper here, to be productive of great good or evil. We shall see.

Charles Horn intends to make Miss Margaret Horn his wife at the latter end of next month, and has taken Wilson's, the shoemaker's house, joining Thomas Heale's, for the honeymoon. Miss Horn proceeds to Wellington by first opportunity, for Wairarapa, as Governess to Mrs. Smith's children.

1/2 past 7 a.m.

A native has just come in from Puketapu; and reports that the "John Whitely" is on the rocks at Kawaroa. I have started Hakopa with the necessary instructions, informed Mr. Leach, and sent Heale and Stewart to render all assistance in their power.

I have since heard that she struck at 12 o'clock last night, at which hour the wind was off the land, and is now a complete wreck. No lives lost. Goods being saved by Rawiri, Hakopa, Tamati Waka, Katatori, Parata, and indeed all the natives, men and women, in first-rate-style.

Liddel, his wife and two children, and Charlton were the passengers. The cargo appears to have consisted of wheat and sundries.

The boat left the Town at about 8 p.m., but the boatmen do not appear, from creditable witnesses, to be of any service, except to look on. The surf is too heavy for them.


Yours very faithfully (Signed)
H. Halse.
To:- Donald McLean Esq.

Part of:
Inward letters - Henry Halse, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0312 (49 digitised items)
Series 1 Inward letters (English), Reference Number Series 1 Inward letters (English) (14501 digitised items)
McLean Papers, Reference Number MS-Group-1551 (30238 digitised items)

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