Object #1023866 from MS-Papers-0032-0228

7 pages written 20 Sep 1865 by George Sisson Cooper to Sir Donald McLean

From: Inward letters - George Sisson Cooper, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0228 (108 digitised items). 105 letters written from Taranaki, Hawke's Bay & Wellington. Contains correspondence between McLean and Cooper with regard to the purchase of Maori land in Hawke's Bay and Wairarapa in particular, and various complaints and issues that arose from the purchases; also contains information and discussions about the spread of the Pai Marire and Ringatu religions (again, with a particular focus on Hawke's Bay and Wairarapa), and about general Maori affairs. Includes draft letters from McLean to Cooper; letters from George's wife Ellen C Cooper, 1863-1872, and from Sarah Cooper (undated).

A transcription/translation of this document (by ATL) appears below.

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Page 1 of 7. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

Septr. 20, 1865.


My dear McLean,

I could not get down in time to catch you before leaving, though I had nothing of great importance to tell you from inland, except that all the Natives seem to be looking forward to a row at no distant time, and are most urgent in their demands for arms and ammunition

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English (ATL)

I believe it is a fact that Hapuku has sent a messenger to Wairarapa to bring up a party from there, and the Govt. people at Patangata and elsewhere in central parts say with great justice that their position will be very precarious should the Wairarapa people come, as there is no bar to stop them in the road - All are Hauhau up to Akitio, and Tautane, Porangahau and Eparaima though not yet Hauhau, are Kingites, and if they did not assist, would at any rate not oppose an invading party. The more I think of it the more I incline to the opinion that these people (I mean the loyal ones) ought to be armed, and I think it is worth while to consider the question of enrolling them either with our Militia and Vols. or as a separate force or contingent.

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English (ATL)


Paul Rerepu writes most urgently from Mohaka for arms and amn. saying that the Hauhau has got as far as Tokomaru and will soon beat Turanga, and he quite expects them down upon him before long. All concur in saying "Ka tata te he".

I think it right to tell you all this, as it may strengthen your hands at Wellgtn. I hope you may be able to get lots of arms etc.

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English (ATL)


I have got a dozen ensigns from the Govr. wh. I shall keep till you come back, and then propose to you a list of recipients for them.

I have a letter saying that Govt. have suspended the authority of Civil Comr. here. I shall go on as usual withroutine matters until you return, when I suppose you will be able to tell me what is to be done.

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English (ATL)


Whitmore won't interfere in the office at all. He has a letter from FitzGerald saying that the Govt. hope to have the benefit of his services in some other capacity, wh. he construes into a promise of the Judgeship of Land Court. Other people seem to fancy that Col. Russell is to be Judge. I don't much expect to get it myself as I know there is no

Page 6 of 7. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

love lost between Fenton and myself. We have never been cordial and he has, I know, been a thorn in my side ever since 1856. I hope you and Ormond will be able to manage to get some sort of promotion for me. I have written fully to him on the subject, and I think you both know my views. I feel quite sure that if you have the opportunity you will both make the most of it.

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English (ATL)


There is nothing at all in Napier to write about. Deck sailed yesterday for Poverty Bay. The 70th are settling down by degrees into houses. Col. Muloch takes Scully's when I turn out. They seem agreeably surprised to find Napier not such bad quarters as they expected.

Mrs. Cooper sends kind regards.

Believe me,
Yours very sincerely,
G. S. Cooper.

English (ATL)

Septr. 20, 1865.


My dear McLean,

I could not get down in time to catch you before leaving, though I had nothing of great importance to tell you from inland, except that all the Natives seem to be looking forward to a row at no distant time, and are most urgent in their demands for arms and ammunition I believe it is a fact that Hapuku has sent a messenger to Wairarapa to bring up a party from there, and the Govt. people at Patangata and elsewhere in central parts say with great justice that their position will be very precarious should the Wairarapa people come, as there is no bar to stop them in the road - All are Hauhau up to Akitio, and Tautane, Porangahau and Eparaima though not yet Hauhau, are Kingites, and if they did not assist, would at any rate not oppose an invading party. The more I think of it the more I incline to the opinion that these people (I mean the loyal ones) ought to be armed, and I think it is worth while to consider the question of enrolling them either with our Militia and Vols. or as a separate force or contingent.

Paul Rerepu writes most urgently from Mohaka for arms and amn. saying that the Hauhau has got as far as Tokomaru and will soon beat Turanga, and he quite expects them down upon him before long. All concur in saying "Ka tata te he".

I think it right to tell you all this, as it may strengthen your hands at Wellgtn. I hope you may be able to get lots of arms etc.

I have got a dozen ensigns from the Govr. wh. I shall keep till you come back, and then propose to you a list of recipients for them.

I have a letter saying that Govt. have suspended the authority of Civil Comr. here. I shall go on as usual withroutine matters until you return, when I suppose you will be able to tell me what is to be done.

Whitmore won't interfere in the office at all. He has a letter from FitzGerald saying that the Govt. hope to have the benefit of his services in some other capacity, wh. he construes into a promise of the Judgeship of Land Court. Other people seem to fancy that Col. Russell is to be Judge. I don't much expect to get it myself as I know there is no love lost between Fenton and myself. We have never been cordial and he has, I know, been a thorn in my side ever since 1856. I hope you and Ormond will be able to manage to get some sort of promotion for me. I have written fully to him on the subject, and I think you both know my views. I feel quite sure that if you have the opportunity you will both make the most of it.

There is nothing at all in Napier to write about. Deck sailed yesterday for Poverty Bay. The 70th are settling down by degrees into houses. Col. Muloch takes Scully's when I turn out. They seem agreeably surprised to find Napier not such bad quarters as they expected.

Mrs. Cooper sends kind regards.

Believe me,
Yours very sincerely,
G. S. Cooper.

Part of:
Inward letters - George Sisson Cooper, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0228 (108 digitised items)
Series 1 Inward letters (English), Reference Number Series 1 Inward letters (English) (14501 digitised items)
McLean Papers, Reference Number MS-Group-1551 (30238 digitised items)

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