Object #1023675 from MS-Papers-0032-0811

3 pages written 27 Nov 1861 by Catherine Isabella McLean to Sir Donald McLean

From: Inward family correspondence - Catherine Hart (sister); Catherine Isabella McLean (sister-in-law), Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0811 (71 digitised items). Catherine McLean (later Hart) wrote from Stobs Castle, Hawick, Roxburghshire and from Edinburgh, Scotland prior to her arrival in New Zealand in 1861, and from Wellington, Hawke's Bay and Christchurch, 1861-1875, including many undated letters and fragments. The folder contains 9 letters written by Catherine Isabella McLean, from Maraekakaho and Glenorchy, Hawke's Bay, 1861-1875.Includes one letter written by Annabella McLean from Edinburgh in Nov 1862

A transcription/translation of this document (by MD) appears below.

Download alow-resolution PDF or high-resolution PDF

Page 1 of 3. View high-resolution image

English (MD)

Marekakaho
Nov 27th 1861


My dear brother

You will doubtless ere this have heard of Alexander's safe return. I was happy to hear he left you and your dear little boy quite will. His account of Douglas has increased my desire to see him very much. I hope we may promise ourselves the pleasure of seeing you ere very long at the station. Mr Strang's visit was a very short one but I feel certain had he not come he would have returned home much disappointed. The Judge did everything in his power to make him comfortable at Napier, indeed he waited upon him as a son would upon a father. I think Mr Strang has fallen off a good deal since I saw him in Wellington. I feel sorry to think he is so very lonely only a little girl in the house with him.

Page 2 of 3. View high-resolution image

English (MD)


Catherine and I feel much obliged to you for the large addition you have made our library. Books are invaluable especially in a place like this where they are not to be had. Alexr has been busy since his return from Auckland inspecting the stock branding & other things. He says the cattle are all in prime condition indeed they cannot fail the grass is so abundant. They intend to commence sheep shearing next week if the weather looks at all settled. Archy is very busy fencing. He has nearly finished half a mile with the assistance of the two boys that came from Auckland. Mr & Mrs Kinross from Napier were here last week for a few days. She is one of Mrs Park's daughters at Wellington. Mr Strang wished me to invite her to come. He said she felt lonely at Napier among strangers. She is very young & seeminly rather inexperienced but I think very amiable. They appeared much pleased with their visit. Catherine and I are very close housekeepers. We are not the least likely to become very intimate with any of the ladies in this neighbourhood but we are very happy together

Page 3 of 3. View high-resolution image

English (MD)

and the time passes pleasantly. I feel thankful she came with me. Her health is so much improved indeed her appearance quite shocked me when I went to Edinburgh to take leave of her. I told her then I had nothing to offer but if she went with me she would share my fate whatever it would be. I feel somewhat anxious regarding poor Anabella for this reason. She never received that attention from her uncle that could enable her to feel at home at the manse. By the last English mail I had letters from home with more cheering accounts of my dear father & mother's health but at their advanced time of life there is not much to be expected. My father is eighty two and my mother over seventy. I trust they may be spared for you to see them when you return to Scotland. How delighted my poor mother would be to see you.


Give my warmest love to Douglas in which Catherine joins and believe me to be your afft sister
Catherine I McLean

English (MD)

Marekakaho
Nov 27th 1861


My dear brother

You will doubtless ere this have heard of Alexander's safe return. I was happy to hear he left you and your dear little boy quite will. His account of Douglas has increased my desire to see him very much. I hope we may promise ourselves the pleasure of seeing you ere very long at the station. Mr Strang's visit was a very short one but I feel certain had he not come he would have returned home much disappointed. The Judge did everything in his power to make him comfortable at Napier, indeed he waited upon him as a son would upon a father. I think Mr Strang has fallen off a good deal since I saw him in Wellington. I feel sorry to think he is so very lonely only a little girl in the house with him.

Catherine and I feel much obliged to you for the large addition you have made our library. Books are invaluable especially in a place like this where they are not to be had. Alexr has been busy since his return from Auckland inspecting the stock branding & other things. He says the cattle are all in prime condition indeed they cannot fail the grass is so abundant. They intend to commence sheep shearing next week if the weather looks at all settled. Archy is very busy fencing. He has nearly finished half a mile with the assistance of the two boys that came from Auckland. Mr & Mrs Kinross from Napier were here last week for a few days. She is one of Mrs Park's daughters at Wellington. Mr Strang wished me to invite her to come. He said she felt lonely at Napier among strangers. She is very young & seeminly rather inexperienced but I think very amiable. They appeared much pleased with their visit. Catherine and I are very close housekeepers. We are not the least likely to become very intimate with any of the ladies in this neighbourhood but we are very happy together and the time passes pleasantly. I feel thankful she came with me. Her health is so much improved indeed her appearance quite shocked me when I went to Edinburgh to take leave of her. I told her then I had nothing to offer but if she went with me she would share my fate whatever it would be. I feel somewhat anxious regarding poor Anabella for this reason. She never received that attention from her uncle that could enable her to feel at home at the manse. By the last English mail I had letters from home with more cheering accounts of my dear father & mother's health but at their advanced time of life there is not much to be expected. My father is eighty two and my mother over seventy. I trust they may be spared for you to see them when you return to Scotland. How delighted my poor mother would be to see you.


Give my warmest love to Douglas in which Catherine joins and believe me to be your afft sister
Catherine I McLean

Part of:
Inward family correspondence - Catherine Hart (sister); Catherine Isabella McLean (sister-in-law), Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0811 (71 digitised items)
Series 9 Inwards family letters, Reference Number Series 9 Inwards family letters (1204 digitised items)
McLean Papers, Reference Number MS-Group-1551 (30238 digitised items)

Usage: You can search, browse, print and download items from this website for research and personal study. You are welcome to reproduce the above image(s) on your blog or another website, but please maintain the integrity of the image (i.e. don't crop, recolour or overprint it), reproduce the image's caption information and link back to here (http://mp.natlib.govt.nz/detail/?id=1023675). If you would like to use the above image(s) in a different way (e.g. in a print publication), or use the transcription or translation, permission must be obtained. More information about copyright and usage can be found on the Copyright and Usage page of the NLNZ web site.

External Links:
View Full Descriptive Record in TAPUHI

Leave a comment

This function is coming soon.

Latest comments