Object #1023444 from MS-Papers-0032-0311

3 pages written 27 May 1850 by Henry Halse to Sir Donald McLean

From: Inward letters - Henry Halse, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0311 (35 digitised items). 36 letters and memos written from Wanganui, Wellington and Auckland (some in Maori)

A transcription/translation of this document (by ATL) appears below.

Download alow-resolution PDF or high-resolution PDF

Page 1 of 3. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

PRIVATE May 27th. 1850.


Dear Sir,

I am off to the Waiwakaiho, and hope the plan suggested by Honi will succeed.

You will observe by my Report that for the last 2 Saturdays there has been no drill, which is to be accounted for by my absence with Captain King at the Police Office about native cases.

From what I hear right and left about that eternal subject, "the Land Question", uneasiness on the part of some of the settlers is increasing. The Maoris, it is said, are forbidden to extend their cultivations on Mr. Smart's farm, but I am not at present in possession of particulars. Edwin Davy, for the first time, hesitates and admits a want of confidence to carry on improvements on

Page 2 of 3. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

his farm, since land in the neighbourhood has been claimed in Epuni's name.

Then again, the clearing going on at Major Lloyd's section at Omata, combined with the recent threat from a party of lawless natives, to plunder Mr. William Bayly, in defiance of the authorities here, cannot but excite attention. The new possession of the Bell Block, the reception of the Governor-in-Chief at Waitara, and subsequent compromise, by the surrender of the tomahawk from other hands than those that wielded it, is still commented on. But the morning is creeping on, and I must be off.


I am, dear Sir, faithfully yours (Signed)
H. Halse.

P.S. 11 a.m. Honi Ropiha has just come in and told me that Te Mumu has consented to give up the land. I wished Honi to see Mumu on Saturday last, and tell him of an intention to

Page 3 of 3. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

cultivate the land this day. He did so, and I attribute the sequel to his admirable manner of arguing in cases when his services are required. Altogether I have reason to be pleased in having such a man to consult with during your absence from this settlement.

(Signed)
H.H.
To:- D. McLean Esq. J.P.
etc., etc., etc.,

English (ATL)

PRIVATE May 27th. 1850.


Dear Sir,

I am off to the Waiwakaiho, and hope the plan suggested by Honi will succeed.

You will observe by my Report that for the last 2 Saturdays there has been no drill, which is to be accounted for by my absence with Captain King at the Police Office about native cases.

From what I hear right and left about that eternal subject, "the Land Question", uneasiness on the part of some of the settlers is increasing. The Maoris, it is said, are forbidden to extend their cultivations on Mr. Smart's farm, but I am not at present in possession of particulars. Edwin Davy, for the first time, hesitates and admits a want of confidence to carry on improvements on his farm, since land in the neighbourhood has been claimed in Epuni's name.

Then again, the clearing going on at Major Lloyd's section at Omata, combined with the recent threat from a party of lawless natives, to plunder Mr. William Bayly, in defiance of the authorities here, cannot but excite attention. The new possession of the Bell Block, the reception of the Governor-in-Chief at Waitara, and subsequent compromise, by the surrender of the tomahawk from other hands than those that wielded it, is still commented on. But the morning is creeping on, and I must be off.


I am, dear Sir, faithfully yours (Signed)
H. Halse.

P.S. 11 a.m. Honi Ropiha has just come in and told me that Te Mumu has consented to give up the land. I wished Honi to see Mumu on Saturday last, and tell him of an intention to cultivate the land this day. He did so, and I attribute the sequel to his admirable manner of arguing in cases when his services are required. Altogether I have reason to be pleased in having such a man to consult with during your absence from this settlement.

(Signed)
H.H.
To:- D. McLean Esq. J.P.
etc., etc., etc.,

Part of:
Inward letters - Henry Halse, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0311 (35 digitised items)
Series 1 Inward letters (English), Reference Number Series 1 Inward letters (English) (14501 digitised items)
McLean Papers, Reference Number MS-Group-1551 (30238 digitised items)

Usage: You can search, browse, print and download items from this website for research and personal study. You are welcome to reproduce the above image(s) on your blog or another website, but please maintain the integrity of the image (i.e. don't crop, recolour or overprint it), reproduce the image's caption information and link back to here (http://mp.natlib.govt.nz/detail/?id=1023444). If you would like to use the above image(s) in a different way (e.g. in a print publication), or use the transcription or translation, permission must be obtained. More information about copyright and usage can be found on the Copyright and Usage page of the NLNZ web site.

External Links:
View Full Descriptive Record in TAPUHI

Leave a comment

This function is coming soon.

Latest comments