Object #1023316 from MS-Papers-0032-0209

4 pages written 26 Sep 1860 by Wellington Carrington in New Plymouth District

From: Inward letters - Surnames, Carrington, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0209 (32 digitised items). Correspondents:F A Carrington, Taranaki, 1841-1873 (15 letters); Jane Carrington, Taranaki, 1876 (1 letter); W Carrington, Taranaki, 1847-1870 (16 letters, including one letter to his brother Fred).

A transcription/translation of this document (by ATL) appears below.

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English (ATL)

New Plymouth

26th. Sept. 1860.



My dear Sir,

I arrived in Town the day before yesterday, after accompanying the Forces down the coast as far as the Kaihihi old Pa (Parawaka). The Troops destroyed eight pas at Tataraimaka, four or five of them very strong ones. I expected that they, the rebels, might have made a stand at Tatara for a time, but fancy as they got no assistance from the south they thought it better to retire to the Pas in land of Parawaha, it appears now they have three Pas there, viz. Pukekakariki, Orongomaihangai and Mataiaio. I was aware they had completed Orongomaihangai, a pa commenced by Porikapa, but taken

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English (ATL)

possession of by the rebels when they came up towards the Town, the other two have been lately erected. At present they appear to be occupied by Ngamahanga Hapu and some few other natives from the South all headed by Paringa Kingi.

The Pas were not attempted to be taken, we merely had a look at them and came back to Town after camping three days at Te-wai-rere about 3/4 of a mile on the south side of Tataraimaka.

Whilst encamped at Te wai-rere there was a skirmish between the rebels and friendly natives, the former having followed us for the purpose of reconoitering came suddenly on the Puni of the latter and caught a tartar, none of our natives were touched and I don't think much mischief done to the rebels.

I am glad the affair took

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English (ATL)

as it seems to have done away with an ungavorable impression (which was fast gaining ground) viz. that the Natives would not fire on one another. I consider that our natives behaved very well under the command of Mr. Good.

There seems to be a view amongst some persons who consider themselves very good authority that the Taranaki Natives this year will go inland and plant in the Bush, for my own part I don't think so, in the first place it is too late to clear bush and plant this season; secondly nothing would hardly induce the natives to leave the coast where they get their shell fish and fish, take these two away from them and they are miserable, besides they have no idea at present we shall follow them very far down the coast.

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English (ATL)

I have heard no news lately from Waitara with the exception that at the Hori Kingi affair the Natives had 1 man killed and 4 wounded, and that some of the Waikatos (Ngatimanipoto?) are coming down again with the assistance of Wi Kingi.

Williams (Te Ngahuru) has been brought to Town and is now getting better, he had a narrow squeak of it, so Dr. Wilson tells me. Waka and his people who joined the rebels are now at Mataitawa with Wi Kingi, at present there are not many men with Kingi I fancy they are all preparing for potatoes, besides a great many are still suffering from influenza.

I remain,
Yours faithfully,
W. Carrington.

English (ATL)

New Plymouth

26th. Sept. 1860.



My dear Sir,

I arrived in Town the day before yesterday, after accompanying the Forces down the coast as far as the Kaihihi old Pa (Parawaka). The Troops destroyed eight pas at Tataraimaka, four or five of them very strong ones. I expected that they, the rebels, might have made a stand at Tatara for a time, but fancy as they got no assistance from the south they thought it better to retire to the Pas in land of Parawaha, it appears now they have three Pas there, viz. Pukekakariki, Orongomaihangai and Mataiaio. I was aware they had completed Orongomaihangai, a pa commenced by Porikapa, but taken possession of by the rebels when they came up towards the Town, the other two have been lately erected. At present they appear to be occupied by Ngamahanga Hapu and some few other natives from the South all headed by Paringa Kingi.

The Pas were not attempted to be taken, we merely had a look at them and came back to Town after camping three days at Te-wai-rere about 3/4 of a mile on the south side of Tataraimaka.

Whilst encamped at Te wai-rere there was a skirmish between the rebels and friendly natives, the former having followed us for the purpose of reconoitering came suddenly on the Puni of the latter and caught a tartar, none of our natives were touched and I don't think much mischief done to the rebels.

I am glad the affair took as it seems to have done away with an ungavorable impression (which was fast gaining ground) viz. that the Natives would not fire on one another. I consider that our natives behaved very well under the command of Mr. Good.

There seems to be a view amongst some persons who consider themselves very good authority that the Taranaki Natives this year will go inland and plant in the Bush, for my own part I don't think so, in the first place it is too late to clear bush and plant this season; secondly nothing would hardly induce the natives to leave the coast where they get their shell fish and fish, take these two away from them and they are miserable, besides they have no idea at present we shall follow them very far down the coast. I have heard no news lately from Waitara with the exception that at the Hori Kingi affair the Natives had 1 man killed and 4 wounded, and that some of the Waikatos (Ngatimanipoto?) are coming down again with the assistance of Wi Kingi.

Williams (Te Ngahuru) has been brought to Town and is now getting better, he had a narrow squeak of it, so Dr. Wilson tells me. Waka and his people who joined the rebels are now at Mataitawa with Wi Kingi, at present there are not many men with Kingi I fancy they are all preparing for potatoes, besides a great many are still suffering from influenza.

I remain,
Yours faithfully,
W. Carrington.

Part of:
Inward letters - Surnames, Carrington, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0209 (32 digitised items)
Series 1 Inward letters (English), Reference Number Series 1 Inward letters (English) (14501 digitised items)
McLean Papers, Reference Number MS-Group-1551 (30238 digitised items)

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