Object #1022928 from MS-Papers-0032-0185

6 pages written by Sir Thomas Robert Gore Browne to Sir Donald McLean

From: Inward letters - Sir Thomas Gore Browne (Governor), Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0185 (71 digitised items). 67 letters, 1862-1873 & undated. Includes some letters from Harriet Gore Browne, and some drafts of letters from McLean

A transcription/translation of this document (by ATL) appears below.

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Page 1 of 6. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

1863 Dec. ?


My dear McLean,

Very many thanks for your two friendly letters. I was both surprized and gratified at the resolutions in the two houses of Assembly and at the unanimity with which they were passed. I thought that the Waitera would have been smothered in the excitement of more recent events but the publications of Grey's Waitera despatch seems to have been too much for so straight forward a fellow as Weld. His speech is an admirable specimen of how a

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English (ATL)

gentleman should speak.

I cant fathom Grey's conduct or see the object he has in view but whatever that object may be it has not been successful for even the Duke sees through his sophistry. I cant congratulate myself enough on having remained silent and waited the course of events.

The combination of Fox and Whitaker seems extraordinary but knowing Whitaker as I do I feel sure that Fox will be emasculated and made perfectly harmless. How Fox can consent to advocate

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English (ATL)

the measures passed in the last session after his blatant denunciations of the Native Offenders bill, I am at a loss to understand. He is, however, a man without political principal and would play any part rather than none. I cant say how glad I am that you have nothing to do with Fox. He is a spiteful fellow and would have done you mischief if he could. I should like to hear how Smith goes on if you can tell me. Your run is I fear more than I can myself manage as I should wish to purchase all the unpurchased land.

My friend, Mr. Archer, thought a good

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English (ATL)

deal about it but has finally made up his mind that he is afraid. If it is not too much trouble would you tell me more of the particulars.

1. How many breeding ewes.

2. How much of the land is really good and how much only hill or scrubby.

3. How many yards or miles of fencing would be required to fence it entirely and the probable expense.

4. Whether the 5/- land would be bought at that rate or whether competition would be likely.

5. Is the £11,000 required at once or by instalments.

6. What would be a fair rent for the Station if all purchased for 15 years.

Would you also kindly tell me the extent of St. Hill's run.

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English (ATL)

The quantity of his purchased land and the number of his breeding ewes. In this colony people wash their sheep in hot water: at least many do: and they say they gain a shilling a fleece by it. The wool here, however, is finer than in N.Z. and fetches 1/6 after washing in cold water and 2/- after hot water per 1b.

We have just returned from an expedition to the lakes where I took my wife and two other ladies. It was very interesting as we got many miles beyond anything but a shepherd's hut.

My wife desires kindest

Page 6 of 6. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

regards and joins me in saying how much we should delight in seeing you if it ever suit you to come here.

Ever my dear McLean,
Yours sincerely,
T. Gore Browne.

If you ever have an opportunity will you convey my very kind remembrances to Mr. Duncan who lives at Manawatu.

English (ATL)

1863 Dec. ?


My dear McLean,

Very many thanks for your two friendly letters. I was both surprized and gratified at the resolutions in the two houses of Assembly and at the unanimity with which they were passed. I thought that the Waitera would have been smothered in the excitement of more recent events but the publications of Grey's Waitera despatch seems to have been too much for so straight forward a fellow as Weld. His speech is an admirable specimen of how a gentleman should speak.

I cant fathom Grey's conduct or see the object he has in view but whatever that object may be it has not been successful for even the Duke sees through his sophistry. I cant congratulate myself enough on having remained silent and waited the course of events.

The combination of Fox and Whitaker seems extraordinary but knowing Whitaker as I do I feel sure that Fox will be emasculated and made perfectly harmless. How Fox can consent to advocate the measures passed in the last session after his blatant denunciations of the Native Offenders bill, I am at a loss to understand. He is, however, a man without political principal and would play any part rather than none. I cant say how glad I am that you have nothing to do with Fox. He is a spiteful fellow and would have done you mischief if he could. I should like to hear how Smith goes on if you can tell me. Your run is I fear more than I can myself manage as I should wish to purchase all the unpurchased land.

My friend, Mr. Archer, thought a good deal about it but has finally made up his mind that he is afraid. If it is not too much trouble would you tell me more of the particulars.

1. How many breeding ewes.

2. How much of the land is really good and how much only hill or scrubby.

3. How many yards or miles of fencing would be required to fence it entirely and the probable expense.

4. Whether the 5/- land would be bought at that rate or whether competition would be likely.

5. Is the £11,000 required at once or by instalments.

6. What would be a fair rent for the Station if all purchased for 15 years.

Would you also kindly tell me the extent of St. Hill's run. The quantity of his purchased land and the number of his breeding ewes. In this colony people wash their sheep in hot water: at least many do: and they say they gain a shilling a fleece by it. The wool here, however, is finer than in N.Z. and fetches 1/6 after washing in cold water and 2/- after hot water per 1b.

We have just returned from an expedition to the lakes where I took my wife and two other ladies. It was very interesting as we got many miles beyond anything but a shepherd's hut.

My wife desires kindest regards and joins me in saying how much we should delight in seeing you if it ever suit you to come here.

Ever my dear McLean,
Yours sincerely,
T. Gore Browne.

If you ever have an opportunity will you convey my very kind remembrances to Mr. Duncan who lives at Manawatu.

Part of:
Inward letters - Sir Thomas Gore Browne (Governor), Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0185 (71 digitised items)
Series 1 Inward letters (English), Reference Number Series 1 Inward letters (English) (14501 digitised items)
McLean Papers, Reference Number MS-Group-1551 (30238 digitised items)

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