Object #1022812 from MS-Papers-0032-0123

2 pages written 24 Apr 1848 by Sir Donald McLean in Waikanae to Wellington City

From: Papers relating to provincial affairs - Taranaki. Inspector of police, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0123 (71 digitised items). No Item Description

A transcription/translation of this document (by ATL) appears below.

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English (ATL)

Waikanae
24th. April 1848.


Sir,

In the event of my being unable, from adverse winds, and the consequent slow progress of the Ngatiawa migration, to spare sufficient time at Wanganui to carry out your Excellency's instructions of the 20th 1nst. I should wish to be informed by your Excellency as to whether, in the distribution of the compensation of £1000, the claims of the Mamaku, and others of his tribe, who took a prominent part in the late war, are to be recognised, or placed on a similar footing, as far as their right in the Company's block can be ascertained, with those of the Ngatiruaka, Ngatiapa, Ngarauru and other friendly natives.

Mamaku's tribe - the Ngatirangi, and Pehi Uuroa's - the Patukotoko, are the most formidable and war-like, on the Wanganui; and their claims, if not distinctly recognised, would lead to endless difficulties, should Europeans, in future, settle on the lands to which they have a right. Neither would these Chiefs consider themselves bound to fulfil any engagement, if their share of compensation was not paid over into their own hands, by the person appointed to distribute the same; that is, if an amount intended for them in satsifaction for their claims, was given to any other Chiefs to be paid to them, they might not receive it; or, if they did, they might not consider the money through such a channel, as binding them to any agreement with Europeans.

On the other hand, their claims being admitted, and placed on a similar footing

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English (ATL)

with the friendly tribes would give the natives generally an impression that our doing so was from motives of fear; and that those who have been the most rebellious, are treated with equal liberality and consideration, as the most friendly.

Hoping shortly to have your Excellency's instructions with reference to this subject,


I have etc., etc., etc., (Signed)
Donald McLean.
Inspector of Police. To:- His Excellency, The Lieut. Governor.

English (ATL)

Waikanae
24th. April 1848.


Sir,

In the event of my being unable, from adverse winds, and the consequent slow progress of the Ngatiawa migration, to spare sufficient time at Wanganui to carry out your Excellency's instructions of the 20th 1nst. I should wish to be informed by your Excellency as to whether, in the distribution of the compensation of £1000, the claims of the Mamaku, and others of his tribe, who took a prominent part in the late war, are to be recognised, or placed on a similar footing, as far as their right in the Company's block can be ascertained, with those of the Ngatiruaka, Ngatiapa, Ngarauru and other friendly natives.

Mamaku's tribe - the Ngatirangi, and Pehi Uuroa's - the Patukotoko, are the most formidable and war-like, on the Wanganui; and their claims, if not distinctly recognised, would lead to endless difficulties, should Europeans, in future, settle on the lands to which they have a right. Neither would these Chiefs consider themselves bound to fulfil any engagement, if their share of compensation was not paid over into their own hands, by the person appointed to distribute the same; that is, if an amount intended for them in satsifaction for their claims, was given to any other Chiefs to be paid to them, they might not receive it; or, if they did, they might not consider the money through such a channel, as binding them to any agreement with Europeans.

On the other hand, their claims being admitted, and placed on a similar footing with the friendly tribes would give the natives generally an impression that our doing so was from motives of fear; and that those who have been the most rebellious, are treated with equal liberality and consideration, as the most friendly.

Hoping shortly to have your Excellency's instructions with reference to this subject,


I have etc., etc., etc., (Signed)
Donald McLean.
Inspector of Police. To:- His Excellency, The Lieut. Governor.

Part of:
Papers relating to provincial affairs - Taranaki. Inspector of police, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0123 (71 digitised items)
Series 7 Official papers, Reference Number Series 7 Official papers (3737 digitised items)
McLean Papers, Reference Number MS-Group-1551 (30238 digitised items)

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