Object #1022476 from MS-Papers-0032-0184

4 pages written 22 Jul 1862 by Sir Thomas Robert Gore Browne in Hobart to Sir Donald McLean

From: Inward and outward letters - Sir Thomas Gore Browne (Governor), Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0184 (73 digitised items). 73 letters letters, 1861-1862. Includes some draft letters from McLean to Browne. Also one letter from Harriet Gore Bowne (undated).

A transcription/translation of this document (by ATL) appears below.

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Page 1 of 4. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

1862


My dear McLean
,

The news from Auckland which our papers have extracted is very interesting.

That Sir G. Grey should have settled the Kaipara difficulty I am not surprized. We had managed to suppress it for so many years that it would not have been very violent. I have heard that old Clerk (the new Commissioner) was the cause of Mattiu's breaking out. Indeed after what the Ngatiwhatuas said to me just before I came away I was surprized to hear that they had commenced the fight.

The Proceedings at Coromandel are still more extraordinary. The very men who opposed me so violently for ignoring W. King (who admitted that he had no proprietory rights and whom Sir W. Martin admits not to be the Chief of the whole Tribe) purchase or lease land in the teeth of a chief Te Hira whose claims nobody disputes!!

Where is Sir W. Martin? Where is the cursing Archdeacon and where the great Forsaith? Will no one enter the lists? I fear Sir G. Grey is too strong for them. They cannot hope to pitch into him with

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English (ATL)

success.

Sooner or later, however, I am inclined to think people will view the Waitara case more justly than they have done and not through the highly tinted spectacles which alone have been used hitherto.

I hear vague rumours that Sir G. Grey accuses me of neglecting the interests of the natives generally and of not fulfilling promises made by him. Do you recollect the trouble I had in getting a pension for Hapuka because he, Sir G. G. G. had promised it and how nearly Richmond and I differed about it.

If my memory serves me rightly I instructed you to fulfil all promises made by Sir G. G. or Col. Wynyard very soon after I arrived in New Zealand and I added that no promises were to be made in my name or for me but that fulfilment was to precede the promise.

Now I should be very much obliged to you if you would write and send me an official memorandum (in answer to a request from me) stating distinctly wheter I did give you such instructions or not.

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English (ATL)

I have no sort of intention of entering the lists against Sir G. Grey or any one else unless my character or honesty are called in question and my Brother agrees with me in the propriety of not doing so. But I am gathering up materials which will enable me to defend myself if I am attacked in a manner which renders it necessary that I should do so. I do not in the least desire that you should assist me in any way which wd. interfere with your duties to the Govt. you are now serving but I think you will not consider it wrong to furnish me with documentary evidence if you see me falsely accused in any official document. I therefore do not hesitate to ask you to do this as soon as you see any such accusations or statement without waiting for me to write to you and I am sure that for old friendship sake you will not refuse me.

I have a long and most interesting letter from Morgan who describes the Waikato to be even more unsettled than it ever was. Sooner or later people will find out that you were right when you said the Maoris

Page 4 of 4. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

only wanted law as an instrument to be used against their opponents and hence intended to submit to it when adverse to themselves.

What will the Assembly say when they hear Fortescues views as to the expenses of the war and of the management of the natives? I suppose, however, Fox will continue to hold office because no one is prepared to take the reins from him, the state of affairs in N.Z. is very remarkable.

I am going to open "Parliament" (so it is called here) today in a speech as long as the Presidents, written in very bad English. All I can say is that it is not one quarter so long as it was when I got hold of it and the English is not so very bad. Politics here are however very mild compared with those in N. Z. Every body hates every hody of course and personalities are flung about very recklassly but there is no marked difference in the political views of the opposing parties. We have "the Ins and the Outs" Farewell my dear McLean kindest regards from my wife and believe me always yours most sincerely,

T. G. B. P. S. Can you tell me what Martin and Co say to the new system etc. etc. Hobart Town. July 22 1862.

English (ATL)

1862


My dear McLean
,

The news from Auckland which our papers have extracted is very interesting.

That Sir G. Grey should have settled the Kaipara difficulty I am not surprized. We had managed to suppress it for so many years that it would not have been very violent. I have heard that old Clerk (the new Commissioner) was the cause of Mattiu's breaking out. Indeed after what the Ngatiwhatuas said to me just before I came away I was surprized to hear that they had commenced the fight.

The Proceedings at Coromandel are still more extraordinary. The very men who opposed me so violently for ignoring W. King (who admitted that he had no proprietory rights and whom Sir W. Martin admits not to be the Chief of the whole Tribe) purchase or lease land in the teeth of a chief Te Hira whose claims nobody disputes!!

Where is Sir W. Martin? Where is the cursing Archdeacon and where the great Forsaith? Will no one enter the lists? I fear Sir G. Grey is too strong for them. They cannot hope to pitch into him with success.

Sooner or later, however, I am inclined to think people will view the Waitara case more justly than they have done and not through the highly tinted spectacles which alone have been used hitherto.

I hear vague rumours that Sir G. Grey accuses me of neglecting the interests of the natives generally and of not fulfilling promises made by him. Do you recollect the trouble I had in getting a pension for Hapuka because he, Sir G. G. G. had promised it and how nearly Richmond and I differed about it.

If my memory serves me rightly I instructed you to fulfil all promises made by Sir G. G. or Col. Wynyard very soon after I arrived in New Zealand and I added that no promises were to be made in my name or for me but that fulfilment was to precede the promise.

Now I should be very much obliged to you if you would write and send me an official memorandum (in answer to a request from me) stating distinctly wheter I did give you such instructions or not. I have no sort of intention of entering the lists against Sir G. Grey or any one else unless my character or honesty are called in question and my Brother agrees with me in the propriety of not doing so. But I am gathering up materials which will enable me to defend myself if I am attacked in a manner which renders it necessary that I should do so. I do not in the least desire that you should assist me in any way which wd. interfere with your duties to the Govt. you are now serving but I think you will not consider it wrong to furnish me with documentary evidence if you see me falsely accused in any official document. I therefore do not hesitate to ask you to do this as soon as you see any such accusations or statement without waiting for me to write to you and I am sure that for old friendship sake you will not refuse me.

I have a long and most interesting letter from Morgan who describes the Waikato to be even more unsettled than it ever was. Sooner or later people will find out that you were right when you said the Maoris only wanted law as an instrument to be used against their opponents and hence intended to submit to it when adverse to themselves.

What will the Assembly say when they hear Fortescues views as to the expenses of the war and of the management of the natives? I suppose, however, Fox will continue to hold office because no one is prepared to take the reins from him, the state of affairs in N.Z. is very remarkable.

I am going to open "Parliament" (so it is called here) today in a speech as long as the Presidents, written in very bad English. All I can say is that it is not one quarter so long as it was when I got hold of it and the English is not so very bad. Politics here are however very mild compared with those in N. Z. Every body hates every hody of course and personalities are flung about very recklassly but there is no marked difference in the political views of the opposing parties. We have "the Ins and the Outs" Farewell my dear McLean kindest regards from my wife and believe me always yours most sincerely,

T. G. B. P. S. Can you tell me what Martin and Co say to the new system etc. etc. Hobart Town. July 22 1862.

Part of:
Inward and outward letters - Sir Thomas Gore Browne (Governor), Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0184 (73 digitised items)
Series 1 Inward letters (English), Reference Number Series 1 Inward letters (English) (14501 digitised items)
McLean Papers, Reference Number MS-Group-1551 (30238 digitised items)

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