Object #1022259 from MS-Papers-0032-0827

6 pages written 24 Mar 1851 by Susan Douglas McLean in Wellington to Sir Donald McLean

From: Inward family correspondence - Susan McLean (wife), Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0827 (34 digitised items). Letters between Donald McLean and Susan. Donald's letters written from Hawke's Bay, Rangitikei, Taita and Wairapapa. Susan's letters from Dalmuir Hill, Wellington (the home of her parents (Robert and Susannah Strang).

A transcription/translation of this document (by MD) appears below.

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Page 1 of 6. View high-resolution image

English (MD)

Dalmuir Hill
March 24th 1851


My dear Mr McLean

Your letter by the Rose although short gave me much pleasure. I could not expect a longer one as you are so busy. Even half a dozen lines from one whom I love so dearly would be quite sufficient to make me contented and happy. I am sorry that I shall not see you before May, however time soon passes and although two months seems long to look forward to it appears short when it is

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English (MD)

past. Besides I have got a good deal of reading to do and when I am busy I never weary so much. I wish to do as much of my work as I can whilst you are away for I know very little will be done when you are with me. When you were in last I did scarcely anything and what work was done was wrong. I have a collar which I knitted then and it is full of mistakes from beginning to end. You will say it was my fault however I give you all the blame. Your watch guard is not getting on very fast for I never did one of that kind before and it is rather tedious but I shall have it done by the time you come in. I know if it is not finished when you

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English (MD)

return it would be like the black silk handkerchief. You would never forget it and I would be teased all my life about it. I am really getting very lazy since I wrote last. I have only been out three times, once spending the day with Mrs Rhatigan, a few days afterwards I was at a party at Dr Dorset's and yesterday I went to see Mrs Kirton. I never care for going our now. I like best to stay at home with Mama and sew. If Mama would go with me I would not stay in the house so much but as I cannot persuade her to go I do not like to leave her at home for I know she feels lonely. She has again been very unwell. I wish she could get rid of that nasty rheumatism. I do not think I told you in my last letter that Ellen

Page 4 of 6. View high-resolution image

English (MD)

Redish is to be married in about three weeks or a month . I wish you had been here to go to the wedding. I hope I shall act my part of bridesmaid better than you did yours of bestman at Morrison's daughter's marriage.

I do not know how the report would have arisen that you were to be in this month. I was calling for Mrs Kirton a few days after I received your letter written before you left for Turanga and she told me that some persons had said to her that you were sure to be in Wellington within a fortnight. Of course I knew it was quite impossible. What people these are for inventing stories. It is not long since I heard that

Page 5 of 6. View high-resolution image

English (MD)

you would not be here for six months. I am sure it is nothing to them when you come in. I like Macaulay's history very much. I have read the first volume and nearly the whole of the second. I am sorry to hear that there are only the two first volumes here. I should like to read the rest. There is one thing in it I do not like quite so well. I think he gives Oliver Cromwell too good a character. The reason Papa's accident was not mentioned in my letter was that it was written before it happened. In coming down the hill Papa's foot slipt and caught hold of the fence and a little bit of the wood ran in to his hand. He did not get it out for a fortnight.

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English (MD)

It was very painful and prevented him from writing. I think I must now bid you good night as it is very late. Mama desires me to give her kind regards. May every blessing attend you dearest
and believe me to remain
ever your affectionate



Susan Douglas Strang

[Note on transcription: patterns for knitted collar mentioned are in MS-Papers-0032-0998.]

[Note on transcription: Ellen Redish married Edward Allen Hargreaves on 29 April 1851 at St Paul's Church.]

English (MD)

Dalmuir Hill
March 24th 1851


My dear Mr McLean

Your letter by the Rose although short gave me much pleasure. I could not expect a longer one as you are so busy. Even half a dozen lines from one whom I love so dearly would be quite sufficient to make me contented and happy. I am sorry that I shall not see you before May, however time soon passes and although two months seems long to look forward to it appears short when it is past. Besides I have got a good deal of reading to do and when I am busy I never weary so much. I wish to do as much of my work as I can whilst you are away for I know very little will be done when you are with me. When you were in last I did scarcely anything and what work was done was wrong. I have a collar which I knitted then and it is full of mistakes from beginning to end. You will say it was my fault however I give you all the blame. Your watch guard is not getting on very fast for I never did one of that kind before and it is rather tedious but I shall have it done by the time you come in. I know if it is not finished when you return it would be like the black silk handkerchief. You would never forget it and I would be teased all my life about it. I am really getting very lazy since I wrote last. I have only been out three times, once spending the day with Mrs Rhatigan, a few days afterwards I was at a party at Dr Dorset's and yesterday I went to see Mrs Kirton. I never care for going our now. I like best to stay at home with Mama and sew. If Mama would go with me I would not stay in the house so much but as I cannot persuade her to go I do not like to leave her at home for I know she feels lonely. She has again been very unwell. I wish she could get rid of that nasty rheumatism. I do not think I told you in my last letter that Ellen Redish is to be married in about three weeks or a month . I wish you had been here to go to the wedding. I hope I shall act my part of bridesmaid better than you did yours of bestman at Morrison's daughter's marriage.

I do not know how the report would have arisen that you were to be in this month. I was calling for Mrs Kirton a few days after I received your letter written before you left for Turanga and she told me that some persons had said to her that you were sure to be in Wellington within a fortnight. Of course I knew it was quite impossible. What people these are for inventing stories. It is not long since I heard that you would not be here for six months. I am sure it is nothing to them when you come in. I like Macaulay's history very much. I have read the first volume and nearly the whole of the second. I am sorry to hear that there are only the two first volumes here. I should like to read the rest. There is one thing in it I do not like quite so well. I think he gives Oliver Cromwell too good a character. The reason Papa's accident was not mentioned in my letter was that it was written before it happened. In coming down the hill Papa's foot slipt and caught hold of the fence and a little bit of the wood ran in to his hand. He did not get it out for a fortnight. It was very painful and prevented him from writing. I think I must now bid you good night as it is very late. Mama desires me to give her kind regards. May every blessing attend you dearest
and believe me to remain
ever your affectionate



Susan Douglas Strang

[Note on transcription: patterns for knitted collar mentioned are in MS-Papers-0032-0998.]

[Note on transcription: Ellen Redish married Edward Allen Hargreaves on 29 April 1851 at St Paul's Church.]

Part of:
Inward family correspondence - Susan McLean (wife), Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0827 (34 digitised items)
Series 9 Inwards family letters, Reference Number Series 9 Inwards family letters (1204 digitised items)
McLean Papers, Reference Number MS-Group-1551 (30238 digitised items)

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