Object #1022190 from MS-Papers-0032-0657

3 pages written 23 Feb 1864 by George Tovey Buckland Worgan in Wairoa

From: Inward letters - G Worgan, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0657 (12 digitised items). 11 letters written from Wairoa, Napier and Wellington, 1863-1876

A transcription/translation of this document (by ATL) appears below.

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English (ATL)

Te Wairoa
Feby. 23rd 1864


My dear Sir,

I made formal application (per last Mail) for the appointment of Master, to the common School at Wairoa. I feel that I could do some good here, and, as it is likely that Government will after the conclusion of the war make some very vigorous efforts to improve the state of things which has been so detrimental to the general progress of the Colony, so, I humbly conceive, education, will beone of the main instruments to be relief on, for producing the desired end. To effect this, liberal encouragement must be given

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English (ATL)

to secure teachers, capable of something beyond the mere A. B. C. routine of ordinary common school instruction I mean, that in addition to the elementary tuition prescribed by the minutes of Council, the Pupils should have their minds elevated by a simple course, on the principles of natural philosophy familiarly explained, in a conversational manner, such as should draw their attention to the things around them and induce a habit of wholesome reflection - this I would propose to do, and also to instruct the children in psalmody. Indeed if I undertook the duties of the School, it should be the first object of my heart, to effect the greatest amount of usefulness, which such institutions are capable of rendering. Now my dear Sir, such being my thoughts on this subject I trust it will not be deem'd unreasonable, that I should request you to appeal to the Council (in the event of my appointment) to secure me at least an income of 100£s P.A. exclusive of all other benefits hitherto the allowance has only been 50£s annually, and Mr. Gason assures me, he has never made a hundred a year since he held the School. Surely it cannot be expected that any man having any pretentions, to the character of a gentleman or an educated person could be contented with such means, as command that respect from others - so essential, to his usefulness.

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English (ATL)

Conjunctively with the School I could apply for the Coronorship and a seat on the bench of Magistrates in both of which capacities, I could be most useful to Mr. Brown and to this district generally. These appointments are much required here. I should be content with my dignity, and should not repine at the abxence of wealth. I write to you thus freely, relying upon your expressed friendliness. You will probably smile at the lowliness of my present views, but misfortune is a great humbler of pride. Should you have other views I will endeavour to wait patiently but I trust you will not forget that "Hope deferred maketh the heart sick". We are on the eve of great changes. Pray kindly favor me with a few lines. I am contemplating writing a history of Hawkes Bay during the last ten years.

With compliments to Miss McLean I remain dear sir
Very truly yours
G. Worgan

English (ATL)

Te Wairoa
Feby. 23rd 1864


My dear Sir,

I made formal application (per last Mail) for the appointment of Master, to the common School at Wairoa. I feel that I could do some good here, and, as it is likely that Government will after the conclusion of the war make some very vigorous efforts to improve the state of things which has been so detrimental to the general progress of the Colony, so, I humbly conceive, education, will beone of the main instruments to be relief on, for producing the desired end. To effect this, liberal encouragement must be given to secure teachers, capable of something beyond the mere A. B. C. routine of ordinary common school instruction I mean, that in addition to the elementary tuition prescribed by the minutes of Council, the Pupils should have their minds elevated by a simple course, on the principles of natural philosophy familiarly explained, in a conversational manner, such as should draw their attention to the things around them and induce a habit of wholesome reflection - this I would propose to do, and also to instruct the children in psalmody. Indeed if I undertook the duties of the School, it should be the first object of my heart, to effect the greatest amount of usefulness, which such institutions are capable of rendering. Now my dear Sir, such being my thoughts on this subject I trust it will not be deem'd unreasonable, that I should request you to appeal to the Council (in the event of my appointment) to secure me at least an income of 100£s P.A. exclusive of all other benefits hitherto the allowance has only been 50£s annually, and Mr. Gason assures me, he has never made a hundred a year since he held the School. Surely it cannot be expected that any man having any pretentions, to the character of a gentleman or an educated person could be contented with such means, as command that respect from others - so essential, to his usefulness. Conjunctively with the School I could apply for the Coronorship and a seat on the bench of Magistrates in both of which capacities, I could be most useful to Mr. Brown and to this district generally. These appointments are much required here. I should be content with my dignity, and should not repine at the abxence of wealth. I write to you thus freely, relying upon your expressed friendliness. You will probably smile at the lowliness of my present views, but misfortune is a great humbler of pride. Should you have other views I will endeavour to wait patiently but I trust you will not forget that "Hope deferred maketh the heart sick". We are on the eve of great changes. Pray kindly favor me with a few lines. I am contemplating writing a history of Hawkes Bay during the last ten years.

With compliments to Miss McLean I remain dear sir
Very truly yours
G. Worgan

Part of:
Inward letters - G Worgan, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0657 (12 digitised items)
Series 1 Inward letters (English), Reference Number Series 1 Inward letters (English) (14501 digitised items)
McLean Papers, Reference Number MS-Group-1551 (30238 digitised items)

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