Object #1022091 from MS-Papers-0032-0532

4 pages written 22 Aug 1867 by Major William Airey Richardson in Wairoa to Sir Donald McLean

From: Inward letters - Richardson, W A, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0532 (20 digitised items). 18 letters written from Hawke's bay and East Coast, 1865-1876. Includes letters from McLean to Richardson.

A transcription/translation of this document (by ATL) appears below.

Download alow-resolution PDF or high-resolution PDF

Page 2 of 4. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

of what is being done in the General Assembly. Reduction, however, seems to be the order of the day in every Department.

You would be glad, as we all were, to learn that the supposed Taupo murders have turned out untrue.

The position of the Uriwera is immediately hostile in the Waikare Moana, Burton, the surveyor, has been warned not to cross any portion of their land.

The Waiau natives have urged him not to go, and Captain Biggs also strongly advised him not to attempt it at present. But he is an obstinate character, and intends running all risks in getting the back line of the Confiscated country carried through.

Old Te Waru has been playing a double part. His statements about the Hau Haus have been quite untrue for some time. Burton says there are about 200 at the Upper or Mohaka end of Waikare-Moana.

Biggs left for Poverty Bay about a week ago.

Page 3 of 4. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

He was warned by the natives not to travel the inland road by Te Reinga. He had heard, also, the same report as we did of a threatened raid by the Urewera, either on Poverty Bay or Te Wairoa. I don't think they will attempt anything here, but it would be a very easy matter for them to inflict serious damage and loss in Poverty Bay, at the present time, with impunity.

The natives here want some leading men amongst them. There is a good deal of wrangling and jealousy amongst them. Carroll tells me they want to sell the lower portion of the flat, on his side, so as to end the dispute there is about it. They are also getting anxious to sell all that fine land between our present camp and Pakowhai. It is first class land, and capable of maintaining a large population.

You will be sorry to hear that nearly the whole of poor old Kopu's pub has been burnt.

Fears were entertained for the large Runanga house, Church, and

English (ATL)

COPY. Te Wairoa
August 22nd. 1867


My dear McLean,


When I was in Napier, you were too busy with Provincial affairs, for me to have any conversation with you relative to employment in any new force which may be embodied for the defence of the Colony. I have ventured, therefore, to ask you to interest yourself in my behalf; as we are likely to be placed on our land almost at once. The Government have only made provision for one Sublatern Officer, and fifty men, who are to be re-embodied, as a temporary measure, so soon as the land is alloted. My claim for service is as good as any; and the influence I have in the place, both as regards natives and Europeans, is second to none.

We get such a small modicum of news from Wellington, that we are almost totally ignorant of what is being done in the General Assembly. Reduction, however, seems to be the order of the day in every Department.

You would be glad, as we all were, to learn that the supposed Taupo murders have turned out untrue.

The position of the Uriwera is immediately hostile in the Waikare Moana, Burton, the surveyor, has been warned not to cross any portion of their land.

The Waiau natives have urged him not to go, and Captain Biggs also strongly advised him not to attempt it at present. But he is an obstinate character, and intends running all risks in getting the back line of the Confiscated country carried through.

Old Te Waru has been playing a double part. His statements about the Hau Haus have been quite untrue for some time. Burton says there are about 200 at the Upper or Mohaka end of Waikare-Moana.

Biggs left for Poverty Bay about a week ago. He was warned by the natives not to travel the inland road by Te Reinga. He had heard, also, the same report as we did of a threatened raid by the Urewera, either on Poverty Bay or Te Wairoa. I don't think they will attempt anything here, but it would be a very easy matter for them to inflict serious damage and loss in Poverty Bay, at the present time, with impunity.

The natives here want some leading men amongst them. There is a good deal of wrangling and jealousy amongst them. Carroll tells me they want to sell the lower portion of the flat, on his side, so as to end the dispute there is about it. They are also getting anxious to sell all that fine land between our present camp and Pakowhai. It is first class land, and capable of maintaining a large population.

You will be sorry to hear that nearly the whole of poor old Kopu's pub has been burnt.

Fears were entertained for the large Runanga house, Church, and Kopu's grave. These were fortunately preserved by the strong force of Military settlers, under Major Frazer. The Maoris themselves were paralised, and utterly indifferent. No one seems to know how the fire originated, but an inquiry is to be held in the course of a few days.

The whole of the military settlers are-now in the Wairoa. The Waipawamate Detachment came in on the 21st. Fraser was very lucky in getting "The Star of the South" as he got the men up quickly, and at a very moderate rate. Since then the sea has been impracticable for boats until the 21st.

I hope your Parliamentary duties in Wellington are not characterised by the same factious insolence as you experienced in the Provincial Council. I was pleased, however, when you put the pressure on, and compelled them to eat humble pie. I suppose you and your colleague, Mr. Ormond, will support the Government in the Municipal Bill.

Give my love to Ormond, and accept the same yourself; and with best wishes from Mrs. R. and believe me


Yours very sincerely (Signed)
Wm. A. Richardson.

Part of:
Inward letters - Richardson, W A, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0532 (20 digitised items)
Series 1 Inward letters (English), Reference Number Series 1 Inward letters (English) (14501 digitised items)
McLean Papers, Reference Number MS-Group-1551 (30238 digitised items)

Usage: You can search, browse, print and download items from this website for research and personal study. You are welcome to reproduce the above image(s) on your blog or another website, but please maintain the integrity of the image (i.e. don't crop, recolour or overprint it), reproduce the image's caption information and link back to here (http://mp.natlib.govt.nz/detail/?id=1022091). If you would like to use the above image(s) in a different way (e.g. in a print publication), or use the transcription or translation, permission must be obtained. More information about copyright and usage can be found on the Copyright and Usage page of the NLNZ web site.

External Links:
View Full Descriptive Record in TAPUHI

Leave a comment

This function is coming soon.

Latest comments