Object #1021873 from MS-Papers-0032-0277

4 pages written 5 Apr 1845 by Thomas Spencer Forsaith in Wellington to Sir Donald McLean

From: Inward letters - Surnames, Foo - Fox, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0277 (37 digitised items). Correspondents:A Cracroft Fookes, Wanganui, 1873 (1 letter); James Foot, Point Russell (Waikato), 1870 (1 letter); Charles Forbes, Manawatu Ferry, undated letter; Father J Forest, Napier, 1865-1873 (3 letters); Thomas Spencer Forsaith, Waingaroa, Wellington, Wainui & Auckland,1844-1858 (8 letters).Also: P Fortescue, Patea, Napier & Akitio, 1864-1871 (3 letters); Miss Eliza Foster, undated letter; Frederick A C Foster, Wellington, 1869 (2 letters); John Foster, undated letter; R N Foster, Mount Erin (Havelock), 1867 (1 letter); Ebenezer Fox, London, Wellington & Auckland, 1872-1875 & undated (3 letters); Edward Thomas Fox, Wanganui, 1856-1874 (9 letters); James G Fox, Wellington, 1870-1871 (3 letters).

A transcription/translation of this document (by ATL) appears below.

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Page 1 of 4. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

Wellington.
April 5, 1845.


Dear McLean,

I duly received yours enclosing a copy of the boundaries described in the deed, and hoped to have been able to have made a successful arrangement, so that that Question as far as the absentees are concerned might be set at rest, but I fear I shall not be able now to do anything, at least not at present, the excitement produced by this unfortunate affair in the North renders it impolitic to moot any such agitating question as the sale of Land at present, and as I have received official notice that Shortland is on his way to relieve me, I shall probably have left this district before the time comes when it would be prudent to moot the question. Nevertheless I am so thoroughly convinced of the importance of making some such arrangement and thereby prevent the annoyance and confusion that would ensue

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English (ATL)

if these absentees were to visit you in large numbers, which no doubt they would do, and cause much trouble to the settlers that I shall strongly impress upon Shortland the propriety of carrying out my views, and shall leave the boundaries with him for that purpose. It would be useless for me to repeat the particulars of this unhappy affair at the Bay as you have doubtless heard all the particulars before this - there is no knowing where it will all end, though I do not think there is room for apprehension for both military and naval force is pouring into the Country a schooner arrived from Auckland yesterday bringing intelligence of the arrival of the "North Star" with 220 troops, and that more are expected. Some of these are coming on here directly, and the "Victoria" is expected shortly from Hobart Town with 200 men, and the Governor has written to the admiral of the South Sea Station to send all the force he can spare so that we shall shortly be in a position to set fear at defiance so far as numbers are concerned, but still

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English (ATL)

in all these matters it is well to remember that the race is not to the swift, nor the battle to the strong, that except the Lord keep the city the watchman waketh but in vain, let us trust that He will turn from us the voice of war and bloodshed.

I cannot yet tell by what means I shall return to Auckland whether by sea or land certainly not by land if I can help it but I must be guided by circumstances -

I send one of the Notices which we circulated here toallay the fears of the Natives at the warlike preparations which are making, drilling etc. and I hope it will have the effect of convincing them that so long as they remain peaceable, they need fear nothing - the guilty only being objects of punishment - and that we shall not like themselves think of wrecking an indiscriminate revenge.

Remember me kindly to Mrs. and Mr. Turton I have not time to write them, also to Webster and family, and other friends if I have any there and believe me,


Yrs. truly,
Thomas Forsaith.

English (ATL)

Wellington.
April 5, 1845.


Dear McLean,

I duly received yours enclosing a copy of the boundaries described in the deed, and hoped to have been able to have made a successful arrangement, so that that Question as far as the absentees are concerned might be set at rest, but I fear I shall not be able now to do anything, at least not at present, the excitement produced by this unfortunate affair in the North renders it impolitic to moot any such agitating question as the sale of Land at present, and as I have received official notice that Shortland is on his way to relieve me, I shall probably have left this district before the time comes when it would be prudent to moot the question. Nevertheless I am so thoroughly convinced of the importance of making some such arrangement and thereby prevent the annoyance and confusion that would ensue if these absentees were to visit you in large numbers, which no doubt they would do, and cause much trouble to the settlers that I shall strongly impress upon Shortland the propriety of carrying out my views, and shall leave the boundaries with him for that purpose. It would be useless for me to repeat the particulars of this unhappy affair at the Bay as you have doubtless heard all the particulars before this - there is no knowing where it will all end, though I do not think there is room for apprehension for both military and naval force is pouring into the Country a schooner arrived from Auckland yesterday bringing intelligence of the arrival of the "North Star" with 220 troops, and that more are expected. Some of these are coming on here directly, and the "Victoria" is expected shortly from Hobart Town with 200 men, and the Governor has written to the admiral of the South Sea Station to send all the force he can spare so that we shall shortly be in a position to set fear at defiance so far as numbers are concerned, but still in all these matters it is well to remember that the race is not to the swift, nor the battle to the strong, that except the Lord keep the city the watchman waketh but in vain, let us trust that He will turn from us the voice of war and bloodshed.

I cannot yet tell by what means I shall return to Auckland whether by sea or land certainly not by land if I can help it but I must be guided by circumstances -

I send one of the Notices which we circulated here toallay the fears of the Natives at the warlike preparations which are making, drilling etc. and I hope it will have the effect of convincing them that so long as they remain peaceable, they need fear nothing - the guilty only being objects of punishment - and that we shall not like themselves think of wrecking an indiscriminate revenge.

Remember me kindly to Mrs. and Mr. Turton I have not time to write them, also to Webster and family, and other friends if I have any there and believe me,


Yrs. truly,
Thomas Forsaith.

Part of:
Inward letters - Surnames, Foo - Fox, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0277 (37 digitised items)
Series 1 Inward letters (English), Reference Number Series 1 Inward letters (English) (14501 digitised items)
McLean Papers, Reference Number MS-Group-1551 (30238 digitised items)

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