Object #1021828 from MS-Papers-0032-0319

7 pages written 13 Jan 1855 by William Halse in Taranaki Region to Sir Donald McLean

From: Inward letters - William Halse, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0319 (28 digitised items). 28 letters addressed from New Plymouth & Taranaki

A transcription/translation of this document (by ATL) appears below.

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Page 1 of 7. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

COPY. Taranaki
13th. January 1855.


My dear McLean,

I forget when I left off last Mail. Anyhow, nothing has occurred lately amongst the natives.

Mr. Woon wrote last post, informing me that the Wellington natives had returned, having learnt at Wanganui that the road would be denied to them, by Ngatiruanui. As they left, intending to come down here, it is not likely they will submit to the disappointment for

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English (ATL)

any time. Ours are still occupied in fortifying. Major Nugent left us last Tuesday. Henry and I saw him across Waitara, --- W. Kingi paddling him over. The Major was greatly pleased with his visit, the place and the people. His manners were so pleasing that the people paid him great attention. The night before he left, Mr. Inlay entertained him at dinner. I did not attempt to ascertain his views; knowing he was sent to report to the Governor. But since we are all so decidedly in favour of a body of Troops being placed

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English (ATL)

here against coming events, --- it is most unlikely that he will concur with us. For what are Troops stationed in the country at all? Certainly not for parade at the capital; but for security, wherever menaced.

Our Christmas has been more than usually gay. Dinners, dancing, and theatricals- and very opportunely so, as it is well to appear light-hearted and easy to the natives, whatever we feel. Miss Wicksteed gave an evening to nearly 50 people, at Hamblyn's,

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English (ATL)

on Thursday; when dancing was kept up with spirit till half past three. It was intended as a farewell before leaving for Adelaide, where she has a brother. In a week or ten days, some plays are to be undertaken at the Freemasons' Hall; 10 or 12 people having been rehearsing for some time. The three named are "The week ashore"; "Box and Cox"; and "Did you ever send your wife to Camberwell?", or some such title. All favourites on the London boards. Afterwards the married ladies will give a return Fancy Ball to R. Brown. Then follows the Bachelors'; which is to bury everything

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English (ATL)

previously attempted.

Rogan informs me that he writes to you frequently. Last Mail I received an enclosure from him; but no letter.

William King is at length married to Mary Richardson. It came off at the Henui, and so secretly, that I knew nothing of it until I was on my way to Pukerangiora with Major Nugent, Vickers, and Henry; overtaking the old Captain on the road to Church. In the evening we dined at Vickers', where we met Govett, who was not even

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English (ATL)

asked to cross the water with the Richardsons after the ceremony; and report affirmed that the old Captain was similarly treated. Certain it is that he left them at the Church, and went to town. The couple are by themselves at the new house. Neither cards nor cake have issued therefrom. Well, if ever I marry, I'll have a jollification and no mistake. Dancing without intermission, and plenty of it. It is said that Captain and Mrs. King intend returning to the Old Country, now that Willy is settled. A natural and common impulse with old people, --- and young ones if they but had their way. And that cutty will remove from Tutara at Brooklands, in which he had some interest. You know that Mr. Govett is expected in Wellington? He left on Wednesday last, and expected to be in Wanganui on Saturday. Miss H. Hunter preceeded him in the steamer. I am anxious to receive the accounts of which I have written to you.


sincerely yours, etc. (Signed)
W. Halse.
To:- Donald McLean.

English (ATL)

COPY. Taranaki
13th. January 1855.


My dear McLean,

I forget when I left off last Mail. Anyhow, nothing has occurred lately amongst the natives.

Mr. Woon wrote last post, informing me that the Wellington natives had returned, having learnt at Wanganui that the road would be denied to them, by Ngatiruanui. As they left, intending to come down here, it is not likely they will submit to the disappointment for any time. Ours are still occupied in fortifying. Major Nugent left us last Tuesday. Henry and I saw him across Waitara, --- W. Kingi paddling him over. The Major was greatly pleased with his visit, the place and the people. His manners were so pleasing that the people paid him great attention. The night before he left, Mr. Inlay entertained him at dinner. I did not attempt to ascertain his views; knowing he was sent to report to the Governor. But since we are all so decidedly in favour of a body of Troops being placed here against coming events, --- it is most unlikely that he will concur with us. For what are Troops stationed in the country at all? Certainly not for parade at the capital; but for security, wherever menaced.

Our Christmas has been more than usually gay. Dinners, dancing, and theatricals- and very opportunely so, as it is well to appear light-hearted and easy to the natives, whatever we feel. Miss Wicksteed gave an evening to nearly 50 people, at Hamblyn's, on Thursday; when dancing was kept up with spirit till half past three. It was intended as a farewell before leaving for Adelaide, where she has a brother. In a week or ten days, some plays are to be undertaken at the Freemasons' Hall; 10 or 12 people having been rehearsing for some time. The three named are "The week ashore"; "Box and Cox"; and "Did you ever send your wife to Camberwell?", or some such title. All favourites on the London boards. Afterwards the married ladies will give a return Fancy Ball to R. Brown. Then follows the Bachelors'; which is to bury everything previously attempted.

Rogan informs me that he writes to you frequently. Last Mail I received an enclosure from him; but no letter.

William King is at length married to Mary Richardson. It came off at the Henui, and so secretly, that I knew nothing of it until I was on my way to Pukerangiora with Major Nugent, Vickers, and Henry; overtaking the old Captain on the road to Church. In the evening we dined at Vickers', where we met Govett, who was not even asked to cross the water with the Richardsons after the ceremony; and report affirmed that the old Captain was similarly treated. Certain it is that he left them at the Church, and went to town. The couple are by themselves at the new house. Neither cards nor cake have issued therefrom. Well, if ever I marry, I'll have a jollification and no mistake. Dancing without intermission, and plenty of it. It is said that Captain and Mrs. King intend returning to the Old Country, now that Willy is settled. A natural and common impulse with old people, --- and young ones if they but had their way. And that cutty will remove from Tutara at Brooklands, in which he had some interest. You know that Mr. Govett is expected in Wellington? He left on Wednesday last, and expected to be in Wanganui on Saturday. Miss H. Hunter preceeded him in the steamer. I am anxious to receive the accounts of which I have written to you.


sincerely yours, etc. (Signed)
W. Halse.
To:- Donald McLean.

Part of:
Inward letters - William Halse, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0319 (28 digitised items)
Series 1 Inward letters (English), Reference Number Series 1 Inward letters (English) (14501 digitised items)
McLean Papers, Reference Number MS-Group-1551 (30238 digitised items)

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