Object #1021768 from MS-Papers-0032-0228

4 pages written 24 May 1863 by George Sisson Cooper in Woodlands to Sir Donald McLean

From: Inward letters - George Sisson Cooper, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0228 (108 digitised items). 105 letters written from Taranaki, Hawke's Bay & Wellington. Contains correspondence between McLean and Cooper with regard to the purchase of Maori land in Hawke's Bay and Wairarapa in particular, and various complaints and issues that arose from the purchases; also contains information and discussions about the spread of the Pai Marire and Ringatu religions (again, with a particular focus on Hawke's Bay and Wairarapa), and about general Maori affairs. Includes draft letters from McLean to Cooper; letters from George's wife Ellen C Cooper, 1863-1872, and from Sarah Cooper (undated).

A transcription/translation of this document (by ATL) appears below.

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Page 1 of 4. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

Woodlands
May 24th /63


My dear McLean,

The news from Taranaki is indeed horrible, though it is only what we have all been looking for by every mail - It seems inconceivable how they could have sent such weak escorts through a country infested by that scoundrel Kingi and the ruffianly Patukai - I send you an official report herewith, which as far as I can judge, is the true state of the natives here - the removal of the Waitara question from the war, has taken away the only

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English (ATL)

point on which they ever pretended to sympathise with the Taranaki Natives.

I have communicated with Ormond since I received your letter, and find a perfect unanimity of opinion between himself and me - Locke thinks the same - and a few others whose opinions are of minor importance.

You see what I have said about the Militia, I should be very strongly opposed to calling it out just now - it would set the natives wondering what we were up to, and might give rise to mischier - Ormond

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English (ATL)

agrees with me here too - Altho' he has once in favor of the Militia which I never was - I enclose a note from him -

I go to Porangahau on the 1st of June, and thence to Sutherland's this will give me an opportunity of sounding the Coast Natives; I expect to meet Wardell at Castle Point, and it might be as well to run through Wairarapa with him returning by the Coast. I should thus be able to give you news of the whole tribe - I will get two of the magistrates to do my work while I am away, which wont be

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English (ATL)

above a fortnight or three weeks.

There are a few Waikato and Ngatipehi people knocking about here - but they are principally friends and connections of returned slaves, and are going back shortly - I do not think they are up to any mischief, nor would they succeed if they were - however I shall keep an eye on these gentry and let you know if I hear anything.


Faithfully yours
G. S. Cooper
P. S. I am neither as blind as Bell or a Bat, but am so ill that I can't sit up to the table to write, so have had to employ an amanuensis. The official report nearly brought my few remaining hairs in sorrow to the grave.

English (ATL)

Woodlands
May 24th /63


My dear McLean,

The news from Taranaki is indeed horrible, though it is only what we have all been looking for by every mail - It seems inconceivable how they could have sent such weak escorts through a country infested by that scoundrel Kingi and the ruffianly Patukai - I send you an official report herewith, which as far as I can judge, is the true state of the natives here - the removal of the Waitara question from the war, has taken away the only point on which they ever pretended to sympathise with the Taranaki Natives.

I have communicated with Ormond since I received your letter, and find a perfect unanimity of opinion between himself and me - Locke thinks the same - and a few others whose opinions are of minor importance.

You see what I have said about the Militia, I should be very strongly opposed to calling it out just now - it would set the natives wondering what we were up to, and might give rise to mischier - Ormond agrees with me here too - Altho' he has once in favor of the Militia which I never was - I enclose a note from him -

I go to Porangahau on the 1st of June, and thence to Sutherland's this will give me an opportunity of sounding the Coast Natives; I expect to meet Wardell at Castle Point, and it might be as well to run through Wairarapa with him returning by the Coast. I should thus be able to give you news of the whole tribe - I will get two of the magistrates to do my work while I am away, which wont be above a fortnight or three weeks.

There are a few Waikato and Ngatipehi people knocking about here - but they are principally friends and connections of returned slaves, and are going back shortly - I do not think they are up to any mischief, nor would they succeed if they were - however I shall keep an eye on these gentry and let you know if I hear anything.


Faithfully yours
G. S. Cooper
P. S. I am neither as blind as Bell or a Bat, but am so ill that I can't sit up to the table to write, so have had to employ an amanuensis. The official report nearly brought my few remaining hairs in sorrow to the grave.

Part of:
Inward letters - George Sisson Cooper, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0228 (108 digitised items)
Series 1 Inward letters (English), Reference Number Series 1 Inward letters (English) (14501 digitised items)
McLean Papers, Reference Number MS-Group-1551 (30238 digitised items)

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