Object #1021508 from MS-Papers-0032-0374

3 pages written 7 Oct 1850 by Henry King in New Plymouth District to Sir Donald McLean

From: Inward letters - Henry King, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0374 (73 digitised items). 71 letters written from Taranaki - Police Office, Brooklands & New Plymouth

A transcription/translation of this document (by ATL) appears below.

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Page 1 of 3. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

New Plymouth

October 7th. 1850.



Dear McLean,

I received your letter dated 26th. ulto, by the Overland Mail on Saturday last; and was sorry to find that you intended to bend your course to the S.E.; for your services as a Commissioner for purchasing land from the natives, were never required more at Taranaki than at present. I hear from Mr. Weston that we are to have, 25 Emigrants per "Mariner", and 100 more by the June ship. But how they are to be disposed of is a question that puzzles the best calculators. All the Company's land is taken up, and applications made by the settlers for permission to select on our Cattle Run. Surely if we persevere, we can get more from the natives. Why not purchase that which I have so often mentioned to you, between the Waitara and Orunui; and the Bell Block might be given out without further loss of time.

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English (ATL)

I hear that old Parratta or Tuki has relaxed considerably in his opposition. Therefore it might be worth while, considering the want of land is so great a drawback to our prosperity, to turn it over to the Company, with an understanding that those who select it, do it at their own risk; and although the Government would afford all the protection in their power, they would not hold themselves responsible for any loss that might be sustained by parties choosing. I merely suggest this as you of course are the best judge what steps to pursue; but if land is not obtained from the natives in this district very soon, we may all pack up and take our departure, with as little delay as possible; for Mr. Weston now talks of going to Wanganui to settle, if he cannot get land here; although he speaks in terms of the highest praise of New Plymouth, both as to soil, climate and scenery.

I will thank you to write me on the receipt of this; and let me know what can be done about land, and when you intend to return; for every person feels anxious on the subject, and fancy that we are neglected. We are daily in expectation of the arrival of the June ship; when I suppose the fate of the Company will be decided. You are aware that your authority for me to receive your salary, etc. expired; so that I cannot draw any more without a renewal. I paid Mrs. H for you £57.1.7, and if there are any other accounts that you wish me to arrange, let me know. I am much obliged for your attention in reference to the Bull, and hope you will get a good one.

Mr. Halse seems to be going on very well with the Police, and everything is quiet with the natives. Mr. Stewart will give you all the news. Mrs. King and William desire to be kindly remembered.


Believe me, truly yours (Signed)
Henry King.
To:- Donald McLean Esq.

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English (ATL)


P.S. I daresay Capt. D. will deliver the Bull at Wellington, when you would have the goodness to make arrangements for shipping him in good hand.

(Signed)
HK.

English (ATL)

New Plymouth

October 7th. 1850.



Dear McLean,

I received your letter dated 26th. ulto, by the Overland Mail on Saturday last; and was sorry to find that you intended to bend your course to the S.E.; for your services as a Commissioner for purchasing land from the natives, were never required more at Taranaki than at present. I hear from Mr. Weston that we are to have, 25 Emigrants per "Mariner", and 100 more by the June ship. But how they are to be disposed of is a question that puzzles the best calculators. All the Company's land is taken up, and applications made by the settlers for permission to select on our Cattle Run. Surely if we persevere, we can get more from the natives. Why not purchase that which I have so often mentioned to you, between the Waitara and Orunui; and the Bell Block might be given out without further loss of time. I hear that old Parratta or Tuki has relaxed considerably in his opposition. Therefore it might be worth while, considering the want of land is so great a drawback to our prosperity, to turn it over to the Company, with an understanding that those who select it, do it at their own risk; and although the Government would afford all the protection in their power, they would not hold themselves responsible for any loss that might be sustained by parties choosing. I merely suggest this as you of course are the best judge what steps to pursue; but if land is not obtained from the natives in this district very soon, we may all pack up and take our departure, with as little delay as possible; for Mr. Weston now talks of going to Wanganui to settle, if he cannot get land here; although he speaks in terms of the highest praise of New Plymouth, both as to soil, climate and scenery.

I will thank you to write me on the receipt of this; and let me know what can be done about land, and when you intend to return; for every person feels anxious on the subject, and fancy that we are neglected. We are daily in expectation of the arrival of the June ship; when I suppose the fate of the Company will be decided. You are aware that your authority for me to receive your salary, etc. expired; so that I cannot draw any more without a renewal. I paid Mrs. H for you £57.1.7, and if there are any other accounts that you wish me to arrange, let me know. I am much obliged for your attention in reference to the Bull, and hope you will get a good one.

Mr. Halse seems to be going on very well with the Police, and everything is quiet with the natives. Mr. Stewart will give you all the news. Mrs. King and William desire to be kindly remembered.


Believe me, truly yours (Signed)
Henry King.
To:- Donald McLean Esq.

P.S. I daresay Capt. D. will deliver the Bull at Wellington, when you would have the goodness to make arrangements for shipping him in good hand.

(Signed)
HK.

Part of:
Inward letters - Henry King, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0374 (73 digitised items)
Series 1 Inward letters (English), Reference Number Series 1 Inward letters (English) (14501 digitised items)
McLean Papers, Reference Number MS-Group-1551 (30238 digitised items)

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