Object #1021466 from MS-Papers-0032-0217

8 pages written 30 Nov 1870 by Henry Tacy Clarke in Auckland Region to Sir Donald McLean

From: Inward letters - Henry Tacy Clarke, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0217 (61 digitised items). 59 letters written from Tauranga, Maketu, Auckland & Waimate, 1861-1870. Includes letter to Hare Reweti (Charles Davis) from Manuhiri with explanatory note on verso from Louis Hetet, 1870.

A transcription/translation of this document (by ATL) appears below.

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Page 1 of 8. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

Private Auckland
30-11-70


My dear Mr McLean

This is sad news from Waikato, the murder of poor Todd - Dr. Pollen will send you the telegrams - I cannot quite understand the circumstances - I do not know whether there is any political question involved - It does not appear that Todd had any warning - The land

Page 2 of 8. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

upon which he was at work had been awarded to the Raglan Natives. Hone Te one and others - and it has never transpired except in a general way that the hauhaus objected - There is very little doubt that it has been done by the Ultra-King party as represented by Te Tapihunu Tikaokao and the Ngatimaniapoto - I am sorry to say that I have not been able to take any very active part in getting at the bottom

Page 3 of 8. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

of the affair, being quite confined to the house since I wrote to you last - As the hemorrhage from my lungs has entirely ceased I hope the Doctor will allow me to go to the office again in a day or two.

I shall have to give up the trip with the Governor and the Prince as it will be as much as my life is worth - I have asked Dr. Pollen to arrange with the Governor. Mair will be able to do all that is necessary - I will

Page 4 of 8. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

write to Mair on the subject -

I got yourletter by the Luna - I do not think that it would be well to attempt to cut a road from Ahikereru to Waikaremoana, it will arouse suspicion even amongst those Ureweras (a formidable party now) who are settling on the coast - and would be productive of mischief. Let us be content to feel our way. I am personally opposed to drive headlong into anything of the sort

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English (ATL)

feeling sure that it will be a source of regret in the future -

I think Mr. Ormond is one of those active and pushing men who would be rather likely to overlook consequences - I know that Mr Vogel was out I think he sees that our best policy is to bide our time - Keeping always our interests in view, and urging them on every fit occasion, Maoris cannot stand it -

I think it was a great piece of presumption on

Page 6 of 8. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

the part of the King party - headed by Aporo to try and get through our Bay of Plenty Districts en route for te Kooti - the Ngaeterangi behaved well in the matter altho' I thought it necessary to remind my brother that the Government wished to pursue a pacific policy. I could not quite approve the style of his address to Aporo (it does not appear in his report as I struck it out) - After urging him to go back and telling him that any attempt to go through the District would be resisted

Page 7 of 8. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

he finished up by saying "he kai pakeke te Pihiketi". This can only be interpreted into a threat. After leaving Tauranga Aporo's party went to Rotorua. The Ngatiwhekane questioned them on the purport of their journey which resulted in their being sent back - I hope this will satisfy you that there is no alteration in the feeling of that tribe to the Government -

I am sorry to tell you that I am afraid that the Ngatihaua and Taua amongst the rest have

Page 8 of 8. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

a leaning towards Te Kooti. In Tauas speech made in presence of his people he reiterated the old Hauhau saying "e kore e mau te rongo ki te pakeha ake ake" - He told me afterwards not to regard it as it was one of their set sayings. I asked him what it meant. He said it may be the (page torn) we shall be drawn into (page torn) evil in the event of which you will not be able to reproach us with a breach of faith. I cannot say I liked the explanation much -


Excuse this hurried letter. Faithfully yours
Hy. T. Clarke

English (ATL)

Private Auckland
30-11-70


My dear Mr McLean

This is sad news from Waikato, the murder of poor Todd - Dr. Pollen will send you the telegrams - I cannot quite understand the circumstances - I do not know whether there is any political question involved - It does not appear that Todd had any warning - The land upon which he was at work had been awarded to the Raglan Natives. Hone Te one and others - and it has never transpired except in a general way that the hauhaus objected - There is very little doubt that it has been done by the Ultra-King party as represented by Te Tapihunu Tikaokao and the Ngatimaniapoto - I am sorry to say that I have not been able to take any very active part in getting at the bottom of the affair, being quite confined to the house since I wrote to you last - As the hemorrhage from my lungs has entirely ceased I hope the Doctor will allow me to go to the office again in a day or two.

I shall have to give up the trip with the Governor and the Prince as it will be as much as my life is worth - I have asked Dr. Pollen to arrange with the Governor. Mair will be able to do all that is necessary - I will write to Mair on the subject -

I got yourletter by the Luna - I do not think that it would be well to attempt to cut a road from Ahikereru to Waikaremoana, it will arouse suspicion even amongst those Ureweras (a formidable party now) who are settling on the coast - and would be productive of mischief. Let us be content to feel our way. I am personally opposed to drive headlong into anything of the sort feeling sure that it will be a source of regret in the future -

I think Mr. Ormond is one of those active and pushing men who would be rather likely to overlook consequences - I know that Mr Vogel was out I think he sees that our best policy is to bide our time - Keeping always our interests in view, and urging them on every fit occasion, Maoris cannot stand it -

I think it was a great piece of presumption on the part of the King party - headed by Aporo to try and get through our Bay of Plenty Districts en route for te Kooti - the Ngaeterangi behaved well in the matter altho' I thought it necessary to remind my brother that the Government wished to pursue a pacific policy. I could not quite approve the style of his address to Aporo (it does not appear in his report as I struck it out) - After urging him to go back and telling him that any attempt to go through the District would be resisted he finished up by saying "he kai pakeke te Pihiketi". This can only be interpreted into a threat. After leaving Tauranga Aporo's party went to Rotorua. The Ngatiwhekane questioned them on the purport of their journey which resulted in their being sent back - I hope this will satisfy you that there is no alteration in the feeling of that tribe to the Government -

I am sorry to tell you that I am afraid that the Ngatihaua and Taua amongst the rest have a leaning towards Te Kooti. In Tauas speech made in presence of his people he reiterated the old Hauhau saying "e kore e mau te rongo ki te pakeha ake ake" - He told me afterwards not to regard it as it was one of their set sayings. I asked him what it meant. He said it may be the (page torn) we shall be drawn into (page torn) evil in the event of which you will not be able to reproach us with a breach of faith. I cannot say I liked the explanation much -


Excuse this hurried letter. Faithfully yours
Hy. T. Clarke

Part of:
Inward letters - Henry Tacy Clarke, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0217 (61 digitised items)
Series 1 Inward letters (English), Reference Number Series 1 Inward letters (English) (14501 digitised items)
McLean Papers, Reference Number MS-Group-1551 (30238 digitised items)

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