Object #1021306 from MS-Papers-0032-0217

5 pages written 2 Sep 1869 by Henry Tacy Clarke in Tauranga to Sir Donald McLean

From: Inward letters - Henry Tacy Clarke, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0217 (61 digitised items). 59 letters written from Tauranga, Maketu, Auckland & Waimate, 1861-1870. Includes letter to Hare Reweti (Charles Davis) from Manuhiri with explanatory note on verso from Louis Hetet, 1870.

A transcription/translation of this document (by ATL) appears below.

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English (ATL)

PRIVATE. Tauranga
September 2nd. 1869

8 p.m.
My dear Mr. McLean,

The steamer ''Tauranga'' will leave here early to-morrow for Auckland; and with the hope that she will be in time to catch a South Island bound steamer, I take the opportunity of writing a few lines by her.

I got a note this morning from St. George at Taupo. He tells me that no certain information has been received of Te Kooti, or his movements, of late. I think we shall find that the statement made by Maihi Pohepohe will be found to be correct. How very sorry I am that your policy is a defensive one. I tremble at the consequences of allowing Te Kooti to get back into the Urewera Country. Should he succeed in doing so, I forsee nothing but most disastrous mischief to us. Whatever may be the prevailing opinion as to the results

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English (ATL)

of visit to the Waikato, I feel sure that he has been greatly encouraged; and that in less than six months, we shall have our hands full. I think the expression used by some of the Taupo Hauhaus, in their correspondence with their relatives on our side, is expressive - ''Ka nui te Kaha o nga tikanga o te Kooti inaianu.'' Those very men spoke slightingly of him on his way to Wakato, ''To be fore-warned is to be fore-armed.'' - and I trust the Government will take an early opportunity of making such preparations as will enable us to make a good stand, should it be necessary. I believe much mischief is averted by being in a state of preparation.

I have had several of the Whakatane Chiefs here for the last two or three days; but, unfortunately owing to the Land Commission Court now sitting. I have not been able to give them much time. They propose to call a Meeting, to which delegates from the Arawa hapus are to be invited, for the purpose of considering our position in the Bay of Plenty, and Arawa

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English (ATL)

districts, with a view of making some proposition to the Government. I have promised, if I can travel at all, to be there - (I cannot get over this business) and have arranged with Mair to be there also. I have suggested to the Ngatipukeko and Ngatiawa, to combine, and to build a strong Pah at Whakatane - the Government to provide the necessary site, (it is, most of it, unappropriated confiscated land). If I can get them all to fall in with it, it will be a splendid position, and will secure our coastline. I feel particularly for these people. Their losses by Te Kooti, are most disheartening, but they do not grieve about anything so much as their Mill, and they have asked me whether I thought the Government would enable them to build another one; that if the Government would do so, they would consider it an ample compensation for their losses. I have promised to lay the matter before you, and I trust you will see your way clear to allow it. The cost would be £450

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English (ATL)

or £500. The site they have selected is a good one, and very near the Pah I propose they should occupy. Please to consider this matter, and give me your decision before I write you officially on the subject.

In your instructions which I received a short time ago, you desired me consider their condition and help them as far as I was able. I wish to give them substantial and lastly help, and this is the course I would recommend. I would also recommend that they be employed in making the road from Whakatane to Ohopi, the only bad port of the road between Tauranga and Opotiki. The portion of the road to be made would be only about 4 miles.

The Tauranga natives are pretty quiet. They would be quite so, if these restless Hau Haus would leave them alone. The Hau Haus are up to some deep game which I have not yet been able to find out.


Yours very faithfully (Signed)
Hy. Ty. Clarke

English (ATL)

PRIVATE. Tauranga
September 2nd. 1869

8 p.m.
My dear Mr. McLean,

The steamer ''Tauranga'' will leave here early to-morrow for Auckland; and with the hope that she will be in time to catch a South Island bound steamer, I take the opportunity of writing a few lines by her.

I got a note this morning from St. George at Taupo. He tells me that no certain information has been received of Te Kooti, or his movements, of late. I think we shall find that the statement made by Maihi Pohepohe will be found to be correct. How very sorry I am that your policy is a defensive one. I tremble at the consequences of allowing Te Kooti to get back into the Urewera Country. Should he succeed in doing so, I forsee nothing but most disastrous mischief to us. Whatever may be the prevailing opinion as to the results of visit to the Waikato, I feel sure that he has been greatly encouraged; and that in less than six months, we shall have our hands full. I think the expression used by some of the Taupo Hauhaus, in their correspondence with their relatives on our side, is expressive - ''Ka nui te Kaha o nga tikanga o te Kooti inaianu.'' Those very men spoke slightingly of him on his way to Wakato, ''To be fore-warned is to be fore-armed.'' - and I trust the Government will take an early opportunity of making such preparations as will enable us to make a good stand, should it be necessary. I believe much mischief is averted by being in a state of preparation.

I have had several of the Whakatane Chiefs here for the last two or three days; but, unfortunately owing to the Land Commission Court now sitting. I have not been able to give them much time. They propose to call a Meeting, to which delegates from the Arawa hapus are to be invited, for the purpose of considering our position in the Bay of Plenty, and Arawa districts, with a view of making some proposition to the Government. I have promised, if I can travel at all, to be there - (I cannot get over this business) and have arranged with Mair to be there also. I have suggested to the Ngatipukeko and Ngatiawa, to combine, and to build a strong Pah at Whakatane - the Government to provide the necessary site, (it is, most of it, unappropriated confiscated land). If I can get them all to fall in with it, it will be a splendid position, and will secure our coastline. I feel particularly for these people. Their losses by Te Kooti, are most disheartening, but they do not grieve about anything so much as their Mill, and they have asked me whether I thought the Government would enable them to build another one; that if the Government would do so, they would consider it an ample compensation for their losses. I have promised to lay the matter before you, and I trust you will see your way clear to allow it. The cost would be £450 or £500. The site they have selected is a good one, and very near the Pah I propose they should occupy. Please to consider this matter, and give me your decision before I write you officially on the subject.

In your instructions which I received a short time ago, you desired me consider their condition and help them as far as I was able. I wish to give them substantial and lastly help, and this is the course I would recommend. I would also recommend that they be employed in making the road from Whakatane to Ohopi, the only bad port of the road between Tauranga and Opotiki. The portion of the road to be made would be only about 4 miles.

The Tauranga natives are pretty quiet. They would be quite so, if these restless Hau Haus would leave them alone. The Hau Haus are up to some deep game which I have not yet been able to find out.


Yours very faithfully (Signed)
Hy. Ty. Clarke

Part of:
Inward letters - Henry Tacy Clarke, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0217 (61 digitised items)
Series 1 Inward letters (English), Reference Number Series 1 Inward letters (English) (14501 digitised items)
McLean Papers, Reference Number MS-Group-1551 (30238 digitised items)

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