Object #1020881 from MS-Papers-0032-0312

4 pages written 26 May 1851 by Henry Halse in New Plymouth District to Sir Donald McLean

From: Inward letters - Henry Halse, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0312 (49 digitised items). 43 letters written from New Plymouth and Huatoki. Includes copies of letters from Wiremu Kingi, Witi, and Aperahama, Te Kani, 1851

A transcription/translation of this document (by ATL) appears below.

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Page 1 of 4. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

PRIVATE New Plymouth

May 26th. 1851.



Dear Sir,

I have little now to communicate since my last, in which I quite forgot to tell you, in reference to the outline about alterations in the pay of the Police here, that Rawiri and Honi Ropiha are prepared either way. The idea with them originated from the rumour of a redaction in the pay of the European privates, and I thought it advisable to say just sufficient on the subject, in answer to their questions, to make the alteration. Should you carry it out, fall lightly upon them. Honi told me the other day that he had a dream, in which you told him his services would be dispensed with, and he really thinks they will be. He attaches rather too much importance to his private matters, slow; the best of the bunch, and one I very much respect. My man Friday, (Hakopa) was married to Rawinia on the 21st. inst. by Mr. Turton. I was present, and attested signatures, which seemed to give satisfaction. After the ceramony was over, I gave the bride a little fatherly advice, and was ably seconded by old Rawiri. In the midst of this, my ears were assailed with

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English (ATL)

an interesting cry of "Catch thief!" when off I started as fast as my condition would permitt (without breakfast) and in wedding costume - to a party of Waimate natives seen in the distance; and on coming up to them, my informant, a worthy man, somewhat tinctured with the N.P. rust and Pedlington growl, was wrong, and charged another of the same tribe, but not exactly the same hue, who I found after the axe had been found where the native left it! Had I not smoothed the matter over, as we went on, the accused would have been down on the accuser for utu, and with justice. I find many of our settlers - and many are an extremely choice lot - are given to running their empty heads into hot water; and then come to me to extricate them from their difficulties. Between ourselves, my complicated calling, puts me to my wit's end; but for all that, I serve all alike, by giving a conscientious opinion; which has answered very well for the last 12 months.

Agents for land belonging to absentees are bestirring themselves, and the rumour of the appointment of a Commissioner of Crown Lands has shaken the squatter's cause to its utmost foundation. I fancy their doom is sealed; and

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English (ATL)

have no doubt our little settlement will, in consequence, assume a better and healthier appearance. At present it is impossible, without the assistance of a surveyor, to know where any of the back streets are, they being mostly cultivated, or used for cow-sheds, or pig-sties; and in some instances, duck ponds, an irregularity that imperatively calls for redress. You will be glad to hear that my brother is appointed here as Commissioner, and expects soon to commence duty.

W. Carrington thinks of going to England about his eyes, but I fear it is late in the day. On this subject I am personally apprehensive, and therefore should be glad to follow a calling that would net take me out at all hours and all seasons. My eyes are very weak, but thank God, my sight is not affected.

William Stewart expects to receive the sack from you, and when you return, I have a complaint to lodge against him and Medland.

Hoping you are well, and that this may pick you up at Wellington, in

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English (ATL)

order that you may return the abstracts before the expiration of the current year.

I remain dear Sir,
very faithfully yours (Signed)
H. Halse.
P.S. Your friends are well, and will be glad to see you, if you return quickly; otherwise they (some) will altogether forget that you are in the land of the living. (Signed)
H.H.
To:- Donald McLean Esq.

English (ATL)

PRIVATE New Plymouth

May 26th. 1851.



Dear Sir,

I have little now to communicate since my last, in which I quite forgot to tell you, in reference to the outline about alterations in the pay of the Police here, that Rawiri and Honi Ropiha are prepared either way. The idea with them originated from the rumour of a redaction in the pay of the European privates, and I thought it advisable to say just sufficient on the subject, in answer to their questions, to make the alteration. Should you carry it out, fall lightly upon them. Honi told me the other day that he had a dream, in which you told him his services would be dispensed with, and he really thinks they will be. He attaches rather too much importance to his private matters, slow; the best of the bunch, and one I very much respect. My man Friday, (Hakopa) was married to Rawinia on the 21st. inst. by Mr. Turton. I was present, and attested signatures, which seemed to give satisfaction. After the ceramony was over, I gave the bride a little fatherly advice, and was ably seconded by old Rawiri. In the midst of this, my ears were assailed with an interesting cry of "Catch thief!" when off I started as fast as my condition would permitt (without breakfast) and in wedding costume - to a party of Waimate natives seen in the distance; and on coming up to them, my informant, a worthy man, somewhat tinctured with the N.P. rust and Pedlington growl, was wrong, and charged another of the same tribe, but not exactly the same hue, who I found after the axe had been found where the native left it! Had I not smoothed the matter over, as we went on, the accused would have been down on the accuser for utu, and with justice. I find many of our settlers - and many are an extremely choice lot - are given to running their empty heads into hot water; and then come to me to extricate them from their difficulties. Between ourselves, my complicated calling, puts me to my wit's end; but for all that, I serve all alike, by giving a conscientious opinion; which has answered very well for the last 12 months.

Agents for land belonging to absentees are bestirring themselves, and the rumour of the appointment of a Commissioner of Crown Lands has shaken the squatter's cause to its utmost foundation. I fancy their doom is sealed; and have no doubt our little settlement will, in consequence, assume a better and healthier appearance. At present it is impossible, without the assistance of a surveyor, to know where any of the back streets are, they being mostly cultivated, or used for cow-sheds, or pig-sties; and in some instances, duck ponds, an irregularity that imperatively calls for redress. You will be glad to hear that my brother is appointed here as Commissioner, and expects soon to commence duty.

W. Carrington thinks of going to England about his eyes, but I fear it is late in the day. On this subject I am personally apprehensive, and therefore should be glad to follow a calling that would net take me out at all hours and all seasons. My eyes are very weak, but thank God, my sight is not affected.

William Stewart expects to receive the sack from you, and when you return, I have a complaint to lodge against him and Medland.

Hoping you are well, and that this may pick you up at Wellington, in order that you may return the abstracts before the expiration of the current year.

I remain dear Sir,
very faithfully yours (Signed)
H. Halse.
P.S. Your friends are well, and will be glad to see you, if you return quickly; otherwise they (some) will altogether forget that you are in the land of the living. (Signed)
H.H.
To:- Donald McLean Esq.

Part of:
Inward letters - Henry Halse, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0312 (49 digitised items)
Series 1 Inward letters (English), Reference Number Series 1 Inward letters (English) (14501 digitised items)
McLean Papers, Reference Number MS-Group-1551 (30238 digitised items)

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