Object #1020664 from MS-Papers-0032-0818

4 pages written 3 Mar 1865 by Archibald John McLean in Glenorchy to Sir Donald McLean

From: Inward family correspondence - Archibald John McLean (brother), Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0818 (112 digitised items). Letters written from Maraekakaho, Warleigh, Doonside and Glenorchy about station matters and family news.Letter dated 24 Oct 1874 recounts the McLean family's lineage and gives dates of birth for family members

A transcription/translation of this document (by MD) appears below.

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English (MD)

3 March 1865

Glenorchy

My dear Donald

I was happy to hear by Mr Gol[l]an and Twigg's letter that you were recovering a little. I trust by this time your strength is improved and that your spirits are better. I certainly felt very much at parting with you the day you left Napier and if I could have afforded it I would have certainly went with you, however I am well pleased you have Twigg for he is a nice kind hearted boy and will do all he can and suit you better than me in many respects. As I know you will be anxious to hear how things are I write you particulars by this mail. I mentioned in

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English (MD)

a letter written to Twigg at Napier on the first inst of Clark and Fletcher wanting to purchase 500 maiden ewes which they have done at 20/-. Their price was 19/- but they gave 20/- at last yesterday and they will get delivery of them next week. I told Mr Clark to be pleased to pay the £500 to your cridit at the bank. He said he would willingly do so. Mr Sherson met me as I was coming home on the first with Mr Kelster and said he was going to sail for Auckland on the next day weather permitting and I asked him if he had gaven Kinross a bill or payment for the 1000 wethers. He had not so I returned with him and got him to signe a bill at three months. Kinross wanted him to gave drafts in duplicate on Buckland which he declined saying that was not his arrangment with Mr McLean but Kinross said all he could to try and get the

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English (MD)

drafts on Buckland and so did I but he would not do so and we had to take his bill payable here which from all I can learn will be safe enough. I told Alexander of it and he said that he saw a letter from Buckland gaving him authority to purchase £4 to 5000 pounds worth of stock. The bill is for £850. The lamb shearing is finished on the first inst and they have shore very good fleeces. It is not all baled up yet as they ran short of bale or I would send you the number. Now my dear brother I trust in God that you will soon be restored to health and vigour again and soon be again [crossed out] able to return to resume your arduous duties. You are sadely missed at Napier at preasant. It is now people begin to see your worth and what you have done for the place. Poor Fitzgerald, that

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English (MD)

day you left cryed. I could not but admire it in the man for all I never thought a great deal of him. You were always his best friend, no doubt as well as many more. The feeling towards you now among all classes is really more than one could expect as they talk and see all your good endeavours to rise them from poverty to affluence. We had news of my father-in-law's removal from this world which was but a natural consequence being 86 years of age. Aunt still holds out wonderful well so that many of the McLean race have lived a long age. I am happy to see dear Douglas is keeping in very good health and enjoys England very much. Good by for the preasant and I hope the next accounts I will have of you will be from your own pen.


Always your attached brother
Archibald John McLean

The natives are quite. The press will let you see any changes among them

English (MD)

3 March 1865

Glenorchy

My dear Donald

I was happy to hear by Mr Gol[l]an and Twigg's letter that you were recovering a little. I trust by this time your strength is improved and that your spirits are better. I certainly felt very much at parting with you the day you left Napier and if I could have afforded it I would have certainly went with you, however I am well pleased you have Twigg for he is a nice kind hearted boy and will do all he can and suit you better than me in many respects. As I know you will be anxious to hear how things are I write you particulars by this mail. I mentioned in a letter written to Twigg at Napier on the first inst of Clark and Fletcher wanting to purchase 500 maiden ewes which they have done at 20/-. Their price was 19/- but they gave 20/- at last yesterday and they will get delivery of them next week. I told Mr Clark to be pleased to pay the £500 to your cridit at the bank. He said he would willingly do so. Mr Sherson met me as I was coming home on the first with Mr Kelster and said he was going to sail for Auckland on the next day weather permitting and I asked him if he had gaven Kinross a bill or payment for the 1000 wethers. He had not so I returned with him and got him to signe a bill at three months. Kinross wanted him to gave drafts in duplicate on Buckland which he declined saying that was not his arrangment with Mr McLean but Kinross said all he could to try and get the drafts on Buckland and so did I but he would not do so and we had to take his bill payable here which from all I can learn will be safe enough. I told Alexander of it and he said that he saw a letter from Buckland gaving him authority to purchase £4 to 5000 pounds worth of stock. The bill is for £850. The lamb shearing is finished on the first inst and they have shore very good fleeces. It is not all baled up yet as they ran short of bale or I would send you the number. Now my dear brother I trust in God that you will soon be restored to health and vigour again and soon be again [crossed out] able to return to resume your arduous duties. You are sadely missed at Napier at preasant. It is now people begin to see your worth and what you have done for the place. Poor Fitzgerald, that day you left cryed. I could not but admire it in the man for all I never thought a great deal of him. You were always his best friend, no doubt as well as many more. The feeling towards you now among all classes is really more than one could expect as they talk and see all your good endeavours to rise them from poverty to affluence. We had news of my father-in-law's removal from this world which was but a natural consequence being 86 years of age. Aunt still holds out wonderful well so that many of the McLean race have lived a long age. I am happy to see dear Douglas is keeping in very good health and enjoys England very much. Good by for the preasant and I hope the next accounts I will have of you will be from your own pen.


Always your attached brother
Archibald John McLean

The natives are quite. The press will let you see any changes among them

Part of:
Inward family correspondence - Archibald John McLean (brother), Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0818 (112 digitised items)
Series 9 Inwards family letters, Reference Number Series 9 Inwards family letters (1204 digitised items)
McLean Papers, Reference Number MS-Group-1551 (30238 digitised items)

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