Object #1020594 from MS-Papers-0032-0178

4 pages written 21 Jun 1876 by an unknown author in New Plymouth District to Sir Donald McLean

From: Inward letters - Charles Brown, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0178 (46 digitised items). 47 letters written from Auckland, 1854; New Plymouth, Taranaki, 1854-1876; Wanganui, Aug 1876; Patea, Oct 1876.

A transcription/translation of this document (by ATL) appears below.

Download alow-resolution PDF or high-resolution PDF

Page 1 of 4. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

New Plymouth

21 June 1876.



Dear Sir Donald,

About a fortnight ago, Nuku, a cousin or brother of Titokowaru, and who is on pay as a policeman, spoke to me about my offer of a pension of £100 per annum, that Waru had mentioned to him. From what I gather for Niku would not speak positively, but I think I arrived at what I was to understand. Titokowaru cannot see his way to taking the iniative in leting the plains go. But he is willing that they should go, will not oppose it, and I inferred, would assist me, if the question was mooted, and brought into prominent shape among the natives, without his action being seen in it. I would suggest that £50 or £100 be given to Titokowaru out of the compensation for the Opako block, not that he is entitled to it in that shape, but if you do not object I will put it through on Nuku's signature as I do not think Titokowaru will sign. Or I could

Page 2 of 4. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

pay him before a witness, but that I doubt this satisfying the Treasury. The other Natives who had former claims in the Opako block would know nothing of it, as I have refused to pay ''per acre'' - or to take a conveyance for it, because ''it is confiscated land'' - and I have promised something extra to a few, to make them swallow the confiscation, which they do very well when the pill is gilded at the expense of the others.

Lucy Grey did very well for a time and has not, that I am aware of, gone against me since. But the last time I went to see Titokowaru with her, she told me (Blake had been some weeks at Wanganui, Turner says after a Mrs. L.L. Levy that he gave £30 for one night) that Warerata and the Mawhitiwhiti natives, were very vexed with Blake and wanted to take her from him and give her to me. At that time I was on another tack (marriage)

Page 3 of 4. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

I therefore told Lucy it would not suit, as I was trying to obtain a particular lady as a wife. I pointed out to her also that if she served the government, I could serve her interests better, by her not being my mistress. She turned it off, that the natives were only joking. But next time I saw her, Blake had returned and she told me that she could not assist me any further, as Blake told her that he required all her influence and assistance to enable him to retain his appointment. By this time my courtship was knocked on the head, and I thought it well to tell her so. For if it is necessary for the acquisition of the plains, no woman shall be left out in the cold; only, they must catch me before I get another wife. I promised Lucy that I would recommend her services for remuneration, I transmit the voucher in due course, and hope it will meet your approval. Now that Blake is off I think it will prove a useful retainer of her services. It is for last quarter, nothing in the present one.

Page 4 of 4. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)


I forgot to say that Nuku showed me a letter he wrote to you from Opunake, by direction of Titokowaru. He asked me if it would do, and as he had no instruction to be more definite, I thought it well to be ''thankful for small mercies''.

I was to have paid the compensation for the Opako and Okahutiria blocks in April, but Tapa's trial came in the way, and I postponed it to May 4, before that date arrived, Major Atkinson withdrew it (£4400) but promised me it should be at B. of N. Z. on July 1st. next, Carlyle. I hope there will be no hitch, as I had great trouble to reconcile the natives to further delay. I made advances myself, have backed an acceptance for Hone Pihama, and had to issue about two dozen licenses for ammunition, to tide over the difficulty. I should not know how to get over the difficulty again. I got them not to interfere with the internal surveys of the blocks. Being confiscated, and Tapa's example before them.


Yours very truly,
Chas. Brown.

English (ATL)

New Plymouth

21 June 1876.



Dear Sir Donald,

About a fortnight ago, Nuku, a cousin or brother of Titokowaru, and who is on pay as a policeman, spoke to me about my offer of a pension of £100 per annum, that Waru had mentioned to him. From what I gather for Niku would not speak positively, but I think I arrived at what I was to understand. Titokowaru cannot see his way to taking the iniative in leting the plains go. But he is willing that they should go, will not oppose it, and I inferred, would assist me, if the question was mooted, and brought into prominent shape among the natives, without his action being seen in it. I would suggest that £50 or £100 be given to Titokowaru out of the compensation for the Opako block, not that he is entitled to it in that shape, but if you do not object I will put it through on Nuku's signature as I do not think Titokowaru will sign. Or I could pay him before a witness, but that I doubt this satisfying the Treasury. The other Natives who had former claims in the Opako block would know nothing of it, as I have refused to pay ''per acre'' - or to take a conveyance for it, because ''it is confiscated land'' - and I have promised something extra to a few, to make them swallow the confiscation, which they do very well when the pill is gilded at the expense of the others.

Lucy Grey did very well for a time and has not, that I am aware of, gone against me since. But the last time I went to see Titokowaru with her, she told me (Blake had been some weeks at Wanganui, Turner says after a Mrs. L.L. Levy that he gave £30 for one night) that Warerata and the Mawhitiwhiti natives, were very vexed with Blake and wanted to take her from him and give her to me. At that time I was on another tack (marriage) I therefore told Lucy it would not suit, as I was trying to obtain a particular lady as a wife. I pointed out to her also that if she served the government, I could serve her interests better, by her not being my mistress. She turned it off, that the natives were only joking. But next time I saw her, Blake had returned and she told me that she could not assist me any further, as Blake told her that he required all her influence and assistance to enable him to retain his appointment. By this time my courtship was knocked on the head, and I thought it well to tell her so. For if it is necessary for the acquisition of the plains, no woman shall be left out in the cold; only, they must catch me before I get another wife. I promised Lucy that I would recommend her services for remuneration, I transmit the voucher in due course, and hope it will meet your approval. Now that Blake is off I think it will prove a useful retainer of her services. It is for last quarter, nothing in the present one.

I forgot to say that Nuku showed me a letter he wrote to you from Opunake, by direction of Titokowaru. He asked me if it would do, and as he had no instruction to be more definite, I thought it well to be ''thankful for small mercies''.

I was to have paid the compensation for the Opako and Okahutiria blocks in April, but Tapa's trial came in the way, and I postponed it to May 4, before that date arrived, Major Atkinson withdrew it (£4400) but promised me it should be at B. of N. Z. on July 1st. next, Carlyle. I hope there will be no hitch, as I had great trouble to reconcile the natives to further delay. I made advances myself, have backed an acceptance for Hone Pihama, and had to issue about two dozen licenses for ammunition, to tide over the difficulty. I should not know how to get over the difficulty again. I got them not to interfere with the internal surveys of the blocks. Being confiscated, and Tapa's example before them.


Yours very truly,
Chas. Brown.

Part of:
Inward letters - Charles Brown, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0178 (46 digitised items)
Series 1 Inward letters (English), Reference Number Series 1 Inward letters (English) (14501 digitised items)
McLean Papers, Reference Number MS-Group-1551 (30238 digitised items)

Usage: You can search, browse, print and download items from this website for research and personal study. You are welcome to reproduce the above image(s) on your blog or another website, but please maintain the integrity of the image (i.e. don't crop, recolour or overprint it), reproduce the image's caption information and link back to here (http://mp.natlib.govt.nz/detail/?id=1020594). If you would like to use the above image(s) in a different way (e.g. in a print publication), or use the transcription or translation, permission must be obtained. More information about copyright and usage can be found on the Copyright and Usage page of the NLNZ web site.

External Links:
View Full Descriptive Record in TAPUHI

Leave a comment

This function is coming soon.

Latest comments