Object #1020234 from MS-Papers-0032-0023

3 pages written 26 Feb 1869 by George Tovey Buckland Worgan in Clyde

From: Superintendent, Hawkes Bay and Government Agent, East Coast - Papers, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0023 (100 digitised items). No Item Description

A transcription/translation of this document (by ATL) appears below.

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English (ATL)

Clyde

February 26th. 1869



Sir,

I forwarded you a copy of the statement made by the returned Hau Hau, Wi Tamararo. I have now the honor to report generally on the position of Native affairs.

It is, by this, a pretty well ascertained fact that Te Waru, with the bulk of his own people, have made good their retreat to their old position at Waikare Moana; also that Te Kooti occupies a safe post somewhere in the Watershed Ranges dividing the rivers of the Bay of Plenty from those of the East Coast.

The Process of the disintegration of the large force formerly with him, has probably come to an end; those remaining still with him, being his old companions.

Refugees from Ngatapa and the pursuit of the Friendly Natives will come in from time to time, and be pointed out to the Officers of the Government; according to the disposition of the particular hapus into whose hands they fall; some of whom will be said to conceal, others to hand over, offenders to Justice.

So little, however, do I regard these troubles as approaching a final termination, that I believe, were the Government prepared to condene the crimes of these people, and offer a well assured promise of Pardon, on the sole condition of rendering their arms, and throwing open their district to Europeans; I do not believe they would accept it. The seattered Hapus will again gradually collect;

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English (ATL)

and, making back for safety to the Lake District, become, as before, a source of disgust and menace to the dwellers on the Coast.

The Friendly Natives, on the other hand, from the continual harrassing of these wars, are almost incapable of settling down to peaceful pursuits, and the necessary cultivation of the soil for their support.

I cannot but think, so long as the Urewera leaders of the enemy, remain at large, - so long will this feeling continue; and any material progress be next to impossible.

In reference to matters hore, specially, there is no movement going forward of any importance, excepting some jealousy amongst the various tribes, as to the custody of Prisoners; and the course to be adopted regards them. I would suggest that the Chiefs, to whose charge they are committed, be called upon to produce and deliver them up when required to do so by the Government; and that they sign an undertaking to do so. This provided Government refuse, on the score of expense to lock them up in a Jail; or otherwise dispose of them. This matter should be attended to at once.

There is, as yet, no further information from Mohaka sent here; some may have been forwarded to Napier, however.


I have the honor to remain Sir, Your obedient servant, (Signed)
Geo. Worgan
To:- His Honor

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English (ATL)

P.S. Paora te Apatu says that he is opposed to any of the prisoners being left with Native Chiefs, until after trial. He accuses Wi of having participated in some particular crimes. Evidently the subject requires very careful consideration.

English (ATL)

COPY. Clyde

February 26th. 1869



Sir,

I forwarded you a copy of the statement made by the returned Hau Hau, Wi Tamararo. I have now the honor to report generally on the position of Native affairs.

It is, by this, a pretty well ascertained fact that Te Waru, with the bulk of his own people, have made good their retreat to their old position at Waikare Moana; also that Te Kooti occupies a safe post somewhere in the Watershed Ranges dividing the rivers of the Bay of Plenty from those of the East Coast.

The Process of the disintegration of the large force formerly with him, has probably come to an end; those remaining still with him, being his old companions.

Refugees from Ngatapa and the pursuit of the Friendly Natives will come in from time to time, and be pointed out to the Officers of the Government; according to the disposition of the particular hapus into whose hands they fall; some of whom will be said to conceal, others to hand over, offenders to Justice.

So little, however, do I regard these troubles as approaching a final termination, that I believe, were the Government prepared to condene the crimes of these people, and offer a well assured promise of Pardon, on the sole condition of rendering their arms, and throwing open their district to Europeans; I do not believe they would accept it. The seattered Hapus will again gradually collect; and, making back for safety to the Lake District, become, as before, a source of disgust and menace to the dwellers on the Coast.

The Friendly Natives, on the other hand, from the continual harrassing of these wars, are almost incapable of settling down to peaceful pursuits, and the necessary cultivation of the soil for their support.

I cannot but think, so long as the Urewera leaders of the enemy, remain at large, - so long will this feeling continue; and any material progress be next to impossible.

In reference to matters hore, specially, there is no movement going forward of any importance, excepting some jealousy amongst the various tribes, as to the custody of Prisoners; and the course to be adopted regards them. I would suggest that the Chiefs, to whose charge they are committed, be called upon to produce and deliver them up when required to do so by the Government; and that they sign an undertaking to do so. This provided Government refuse, on the score of expense to lock them up in a Jail; or otherwise dispose of them. This matter should be attended to at once.

There is, as yet, no further information from Mohaka sent here; some may have been forwarded to Napier, however.


I have the honor to remain Sir, Your obedient servant, (Signed)
Geo. Worgan
To:- His Honor
P.S. Paora te Apatu says that he is opposed to any of the prisoners being left with Native Chiefs, until after trial. He accuses Wi of having participated in some particular crimes. Evidently the subject requires very careful consideration.

Part of:
Superintendent, Hawkes Bay and Government Agent, East Coast - Papers, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0023 (100 digitised items)
Series 7 Official papers, Reference Number Series 7 Official papers (3737 digitised items)
McLean Papers, Reference Number MS-Group-1551 (30238 digitised items)

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