Object #1020093 from MS-Papers-0032-0817

5 pages written 29 Oct 1859 by Archibald John McLean in Maraekakaho to Sir Donald McLean

From: Inward family correspondence - Archibald John McLean (brother), Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0817 (65 digitised items). Letters written on board ship or from various ports, 1847-1858 prior to his arrival in New Zealand in mid-1858. From then on the letters are almost all written from Maraekakaho about station matters.

A transcription/translation of this document (by MD) appears below.

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Page 1 of 5. View high-resolution image

English (MD)

29 October 1859

Maraekakaho

My dear Donald

It is some time now since I heard from you and I did not write as I did not know where to address you. We are getting on very well here this last month. Alex has been at home the most of the time since he came back and I am pleased to say is paying attention to the work. I finished fencing all that padock behind the woolshed and that padock behind the woodshed and built a good part of a yard. Three days will finish it an extension to

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English (MD)

sheep yard. We have been this last week preparing the timber for the addition to the woolshed and will commence to put it up in a few days. The gardin and crops there are doing very well for all the drought we have had but I am very sorry the grass is not doing so well. The season has been much against it. The wheat is looking very well for the season. I hope we will have rain before long, if not it will go hard with the country here. The lambs are not cutt as yet. The Maid of Isla[y] folded about a month ago and the fold is doing well. Their has been 4 calves from the cattle of Harris and they are doing well. One chest of tea lasted us 8 months and 26 lb of it was served out to the bush men and Dolbell's drays which if none was given out would last the station the full year, and last year two half boxes and a quarter chest only lasted 6 mos. and only 14lbs served out of them. We have plenty of potatoes to last us till the new crop comes and the gardin now produces plenty of green stuffs. I am grieved to say that nearly all the forest trees that came from Auckland is a failure. It never will do to have the pines so long out of ground. They are a

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English (MD)

very precarious tribe to work with I hear and must be propagated from seed. I have have a few blue gums and I have found a place at the end of the padock for trees. They will be valuable down there in time. I had a letter from Neil Black in Liverpool saying that he has not received anything as yet for the 11 20 dollar bills I think I told you about which will be a fearful loss to me for I placed some dependance on getting them cashed but I fear the bank will swallow them all up. It almost drives me to distraction when I think of having been done out of my hard earned

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English (MD)

money in this way. I find by a letter from home that Mr Goodridge is getting up again. I may perhaps recover from him some day. He owes me £270 but it is only chance. Neil Walker has been here for the last 3 weeks and working one of the drays so that matters are doing very well at preasant. The cook continues to be saving and attentive. I hear you will be some time before you get to Auckland yet. Poor litt

Page 5 of 5. View high-resolution image

English (MD)

Douglas will miss you much this time as he was just beginning to find the good of a parent but it is to be hoped you will have a good spell when you get back. The only happyness I have got is when I am hard at work and when I find work going on with me and people willing to help. Let me hear from you soon for I long to have a letter from you.


Ever your affectionate
Archibald John McLean

English (MD)

29 October 1859

Maraekakaho

My dear Donald

It is some time now since I heard from you and I did not write as I did not know where to address you. We are getting on very well here this last month. Alex has been at home the most of the time since he came back and I am pleased to say is paying attention to the work. I finished fencing all that padock behind the woolshed and that padock behind the woodshed and built a good part of a yard. Three days will finish it an extension to sheep yard. We have been this last week preparing the timber for the addition to the woolshed and will commence to put it up in a few days. The gardin and crops there are doing very well for all the drought we have had but I am very sorry the grass is not doing so well. The season has been much against it. The wheat is looking very well for the season. I hope we will have rain before long, if not it will go hard with the country here. The lambs are not cutt as yet. The Maid of Isla[y] folded about a month ago and the fold is doing well. Their has been 4 calves from the cattle of Harris and they are doing well. One chest of tea lasted us 8 months and 26 lb of it was served out to the bush men and Dolbell's drays which if none was given out would last the station the full year, and last year two half boxes and a quarter chest only lasted 6 mos. and only 14lbs served out of them. We have plenty of potatoes to last us till the new crop comes and the gardin now produces plenty of green stuffs. I am grieved to say that nearly all the forest trees that came from Auckland is a failure. It never will do to have the pines so long out of ground. They are a very precarious tribe to work with I hear and must be propagated from seed. I have have a few blue gums and I have found a place at the end of the padock for trees. They will be valuable down there in time. I had a letter from Neil Black in Liverpool saying that he has not received anything as yet for the 11 20 dollar bills I think I told you about which will be a fearful loss to me for I placed some dependance on getting them cashed but I fear the bank will swallow them all up. It almost drives me to distraction when I think of having been done out of my hard earned money in this way. I find by a letter from home that Mr Goodridge is getting up again. I may perhaps recover from him some day. He owes me £270 but it is only chance. Neil Walker has been here for the last 3 weeks and working one of the drays so that matters are doing very well at preasant. The cook continues to be saving and attentive. I hear you will be some time before you get to Auckland yet. Poor litt Douglas will miss you much this time as he was just beginning to find the good of a parent but it is to be hoped you will have a good spell when you get back. The only happyness I have got is when I am hard at work and when I find work going on with me and people willing to help. Let me hear from you soon for I long to have a letter from you.


Ever your affectionate
Archibald John McLean

Part of:
Inward family correspondence - Archibald John McLean (brother), Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0817 (65 digitised items)
Series 9 Inwards family letters, Reference Number Series 9 Inwards family letters (1204 digitised items)
McLean Papers, Reference Number MS-Group-1551 (30238 digitised items)

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