Object #1020051 from MS-Papers-0032-0484

4 pages written 26 Jan 1870 by John Davies Ormond in Napier City to Sir Donald McLean

From: Inward letters - J D Ormond, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0484 (67 digitised items). 65 letters written from Napier. Includes copy of letter from Te Poihipi Tukairangi, Pahautea Kaingaroa (in Maori), 14 May 1870; letter from Te Moananui to Hamana Tiakiwai, Napier, 3 Apr 1870.Also letter from Ormond to Daniel Pollen; Ormond to Lieut Col James Fraser, 3 Dec 1869; Lieut Col James Fraser to Capt Reuner, 4 Dec 1869.

A transcription/translation of this document (by ATL) appears below.

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Page 1 of 4. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

Napier,

Jan. 26th, 1870.



My dear McLean,

I have only just heard the 'Star of the South' leaves in a few minutes for Auckland -- fortunately I have not much to write about. I need not say how anxiously we are looking for news from Tauranga -- Te Kooti should not escape us this time and from the last advices I had of the progress of the Taupo force I do not see how he can. Please tell Vogel I received his telegram yesterday evening and was greatly assured at hearing Firth was being stopped. Fox and Gisborne have both been in a great state of disgust at Pollen accrediting Firth What have you done to cut off Kooti's return to the King country that is a most important point to guard if he get back then it can end in nothing else but war with the King or if it

Page 2 of 4. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

did not -- your Govt. would not hold office a day after the Assembly met. There is one thing the public of New Zealand would never sanction and that is permitting the Maori King to shelter a wretch like Kooti -- No matter what the risk -- if Kooti goes there we must go after him. This is the feeling of the country and to follow any other course would be ruinous. I sincerely trust you have avoided this complication and that ere this our forces have succeeded in bringing him to book.

I received your letter covering instructions to McDonnell desiring him to move from Tokano to Tapuaehararu. I wonder at your not feeling assured I should have acted. Of course you have known long ago that your despatches met McDonnell joined by Topia and Kemp at Waimahana that was on the 20th.

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English (ATL)


I am still very anxious about the Constabulary arrangements -- in this district the whole service is going to pot -- the best men are giving notice and going in large numbers and unless something is done speedily we shall be without a trained force again -- I have written an urgent letter to Wellington upon the subject, of which I will enclose a copy or if Green cannot get it ready for this steamer it shall go by the Wellington on Saturday.

I must leave writing on other subjects to next opportunity and sincerely trusting that your endeavours may be successful believe me always


Yours very sincerely
J.D. Ormond.
P.S. I noted your instructions to McDonnell were very cautious in tone -- I found that a very little caution went a long way and wd.

Page 4 of 4. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

advise you to remember that. Of course there is no necessity for McDonnell returning to Taupo he is not suited to what has to be done there and moreover is glad to get away -- Locke is endeavouring to arrange a weekly mail service to Cambridge from Tapuaehararu and I have desired him to endeavor to purchase a piece of land on the other side of the Waikato from Tapuaehararu for port etc. Tokano is abandoned or rather there a dozen men there finishing the Boats but they will be withdrawn at once Tapuaehararu, Opepe and Runanga must be held until Urewera are arranged with -- Locke has sent letter to Whenuanui inviting him to make peace this was done in reply to his message which I have already sent you -- I am writing to save mail and must close.
Yours,
J.D. Omond.

English (ATL)

Napier,

Jan. 26th, 1870.



My dear McLean,

I have only just heard the 'Star of the South' leaves in a few minutes for Auckland -- fortunately I have not much to write about. I need not say how anxiously we are looking for news from Tauranga -- Te Kooti should not escape us this time and from the last advices I had of the progress of the Taupo force I do not see how he can. Please tell Vogel I received his telegram yesterday evening and was greatly assured at hearing Firth was being stopped. Fox and Gisborne have both been in a great state of disgust at Pollen accrediting Firth What have you done to cut off Kooti's return to the King country that is a most important point to guard if he get back then it can end in nothing else but war with the King or if it did not -- your Govt. would not hold office a day after the Assembly met. There is one thing the public of New Zealand would never sanction and that is permitting the Maori King to shelter a wretch like Kooti -- No matter what the risk -- if Kooti goes there we must go after him. This is the feeling of the country and to follow any other course would be ruinous. I sincerely trust you have avoided this complication and that ere this our forces have succeeded in bringing him to book.

I received your letter covering instructions to McDonnell desiring him to move from Tokano to Tapuaehararu. I wonder at your not feeling assured I should have acted. Of course you have known long ago that your despatches met McDonnell joined by Topia and Kemp at Waimahana that was on the 20th.

I am still very anxious about the Constabulary arrangements -- in this district the whole service is going to pot -- the best men are giving notice and going in large numbers and unless something is done speedily we shall be without a trained force again -- I have written an urgent letter to Wellington upon the subject, of which I will enclose a copy or if Green cannot get it ready for this steamer it shall go by the Wellington on Saturday.

I must leave writing on other subjects to next opportunity and sincerely trusting that your endeavours may be successful believe me always


Yours very sincerely
J.D. Ormond.
P.S. I noted your instructions to McDonnell were very cautious in tone -- I found that a very little caution went a long way and wd. advise you to remember that. Of course there is no necessity for McDonnell returning to Taupo he is not suited to what has to be done there and moreover is glad to get away -- Locke is endeavouring to arrange a weekly mail service to Cambridge from Tapuaehararu and I have desired him to endeavor to purchase a piece of land on the other side of the Waikato from Tapuaehararu for port etc. Tokano is abandoned or rather there a dozen men there finishing the Boats but they will be withdrawn at once Tapuaehararu, Opepe and Runanga must be held until Urewera are arranged with -- Locke has sent letter to Whenuanui inviting him to make peace this was done in reply to his message which I have already sent you -- I am writing to save mail and must close.
Yours,
J.D. Omond.

Part of:
Inward letters - J D Ormond, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0484 (67 digitised items)
Series 1 Inward letters (English), Reference Number Series 1 Inward letters (English) (14501 digitised items)
McLean Papers, Reference Number MS-Group-1551 (30238 digitised items)

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