Object #1019965 from MS-Papers-0032-0657

3 pages written 25 Jun 1866 by George Tovey Buckland Worgan in Napier City to Sir Donald McLean

From: Inward letters - G Worgan, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0657 (12 digitised items). 11 letters written from Wairoa, Napier and Wellington, 1863-1876

A transcription/translation of this document (by ATL) appears below.

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English (ATL)

Napier
June 25th 1866

To His Honor, D.McLean Esq.
My dear Sir,

As I may not have the pleasure of a private talk with you prior to your leaving for Wellington I trouble you with these few lines. I shall feel obliged if you would kindly ask my nephew, before you return to Napier (I mean Mr. Robert Pharazyn) to place in your hands my Brothers Book (The Divine Week) I place great store by it, as from the state of his health, it may be the last autograph of his I shall ever see. I hear privately that you are to request the assembly to pass an Act, to enable you to redeem your pledge, to the old settlers at the Wairoa, that their interests, at the time of your purchase should be conserved. Now, as regards ourselves, I have only to observe, that the parties buying

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English (ATL)

our property did so, without any expectation of compensation, being allowed, otherwise we should have obtained a price at least equal to the Provincial Surveyors estimate vide, 950£s whereas, in the absence of any such, promise, at the time of sale we only obtained 505, £s, for the two houses, regarding the pledge as personal to myself, and being no longer in a position to derive any benefit from its fulfilment, it would be infinitely more agreeable to me, that the Government should derive, the advantage, of the low peice realized. At any rate it is manifest, that the present holders have no claims against the P. G. For ourselves, your Honor, may find other ways of requiting my son, and self, for the aid we afforded, in seconding your Honors action in the purchase of the Wairoa, without presuming to tax your Honor with being in any way indebted, to my humble assistance, in the attainment, of your present high position, I may be permitted to say that I was the first person that openly and in print, drew the attention of the Public to your preeminent claims to be their Representative. I now further venture to say that not six months will elapse without your having offered to your acceptance the distinguished post of Native Minister, and this I boldly say, that no man in these Colonies is so entirely fitted to occupy that position as yourself, and none, could render an equal amount of invaluable services to the colonies, as yourself in the discharge of those greatly responsible duties, involved in such position should my prediction prove correct I trust no considerations, will, avail to prevent your Honor's courageously accepting the Post, onerous, as it must necessarily be. I need not say that my best wishes, and

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English (ATL)

warmest sympathies, will go with you in the arduous undertaking - We are too much experienced in life not to know that high public appointments entail much care, and vexation, but it is our duty not to shrink when duty calls us to the helm I writefrankly as we are old friends. In respect to the Wairoa affair I confess it is a sore subject with me and having said my say I never wish to refer to it again. I firmly believe your Honor will not forget me if an opportunity should occur, of securing my future comfort. The Sergeantsy would have suited me exactly, so would the position of an R. M. but beggars must not be choosers. I must leave you to be judge of my capability. I will do the best I can in my present position, but cannot but feel that my intellects, are worthy of something better.

Wishing your Honor God speed I remain with all respect
Most obediently yours
G. Worgan

English (ATL)

Napier
June 25th 1866

To His Honor, D.McLean Esq.
My dear Sir,

As I may not have the pleasure of a private talk with you prior to your leaving for Wellington I trouble you with these few lines. I shall feel obliged if you would kindly ask my nephew, before you return to Napier (I mean Mr. Robert Pharazyn) to place in your hands my Brothers Book (The Divine Week) I place great store by it, as from the state of his health, it may be the last autograph of his I shall ever see. I hear privately that you are to request the assembly to pass an Act, to enable you to redeem your pledge, to the old settlers at the Wairoa, that their interests, at the time of your purchase should be conserved. Now, as regards ourselves, I have only to observe, that the parties buying our property did so, without any expectation of compensation, being allowed, otherwise we should have obtained a price at least equal to the Provincial Surveyors estimate vide, 950£s whereas, in the absence of any such, promise, at the time of sale we only obtained 505, £s, for the two houses, regarding the pledge as personal to myself, and being no longer in a position to derive any benefit from its fulfilment, it would be infinitely more agreeable to me, that the Government should derive, the advantage, of the low peice realized. At any rate it is manifest, that the present holders have no claims against the P. G. For ourselves, your Honor, may find other ways of requiting my son, and self, for the aid we afforded, in seconding your Honors action in the purchase of the Wairoa, without presuming to tax your Honor with being in any way indebted, to my humble assistance, in the attainment, of your present high position, I may be permitted to say that I was the first person that openly and in print, drew the attention of the Public to your preeminent claims to be their Representative. I now further venture to say that not six months will elapse without your having offered to your acceptance the distinguished post of Native Minister, and this I boldly say, that no man in these Colonies is so entirely fitted to occupy that position as yourself, and none, could render an equal amount of invaluable services to the colonies, as yourself in the discharge of those greatly responsible duties, involved in such position should my prediction prove correct I trust no considerations, will, avail to prevent your Honor's courageously accepting the Post, onerous, as it must necessarily be. I need not say that my best wishes, and warmest sympathies, will go with you in the arduous undertaking - We are too much experienced in life not to know that high public appointments entail much care, and vexation, but it is our duty not to shrink when duty calls us to the helm I writefrankly as we are old friends. In respect to the Wairoa affair I confess it is a sore subject with me and having said my say I never wish to refer to it again. I firmly believe your Honor will not forget me if an opportunity should occur, of securing my future comfort. The Sergeantsy would have suited me exactly, so would the position of an R. M. but beggars must not be choosers. I must leave you to be judge of my capability. I will do the best I can in my present position, but cannot but feel that my intellects, are worthy of something better.

Wishing your Honor God speed I remain with all respect
Most obediently yours
G. Worgan

Part of:
Inward letters - G Worgan, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0657 (12 digitised items)
Series 1 Inward letters (English), Reference Number Series 1 Inward letters (English) (14501 digitised items)
McLean Papers, Reference Number MS-Group-1551 (30238 digitised items)

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