Object #1019887 from MS-Papers-0032-0185

8 pages written by Sir Thomas Robert Gore Browne to Sir Donald McLean

From: Inward letters - Sir Thomas Gore Browne (Governor), Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0185 (71 digitised items). 67 letters, 1862-1873 & undated. Includes some letters from Harriet Gore Browne, and some drafts of letters from McLean

A transcription/translation of this document (by ATL) appears below.

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Page 1 of 8. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

Extract from letter from Gore-Brown to McLean.

Steward tells me you want another sketch of my ugly countenance and so I send you one. Please burn that hideous one which was done in N.Z.

You remember my asking you about Hapuka's pension - on looking over my Mem. book I found my Memorandum to Richmond on the subject; it is dated 3 Jan. 1857 and the original promise to Hapuka is quoted

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English (ATL)

and was forwarded in it. The promise was signed by the civil secretary and dated 6 Oct. 1853.

I only mention this in order to prove the correctness of my memory on the subject. I therefore gave but one pension (that of Taraihi £20) until the war broke out. I would have given many more if I had had the means of doing so but that is not the point at issue. I never, however allude to Grey or his doings in any way, feeling satisfied that time will rectify a great many misconceptions.

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English (ATL)


Although I have seen no announcement of the fact I assume and hope that you are Superintendent of Hawkes' Bay province and I am quite sure the settlers have chosen the right man in choosing you. Besides your good and sound sense in all ordinary matters, you have a special qualification for your present office, viz. that you are I firmly believe the only man in N.Z. whom the Maoris really trust. If therefore any man can keep the peace you will do so and that is

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English (ATL)

what sheep farmers really want. When there is any account of your doings in the newspaper I wish you would send me one occasionally. I sent you a paper from hence containing a very interesting letter from Amphlet (late of the Niger) who was one of the survivors of that dreadful shipwreck at the Manakau.

I can't yet understand how it happened - the pilot seems to have been steering the vessell from the Flag staff and saw her go aground yet did not recall the Wonga Wonga and send her to assist.

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English (ATL)


If the Auckland Provincial Govt. would have put a telegraph as I so earnestly urged (both in writing and by speech) the Harrier would have been able to hear of the accident and get out in time to save all lives! Burnett had spent a month with us a at Xmas and we liked him very much indeed so that we felt the disaster very severely.

I hear Grey has gone to Taranaki and hopes to get Tataraimuka back in peace. If he

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English (ATL)

succeeds he will have much to be thankful for. If he fails what is to happen next? The Times does not seem inclined to favour the N.Z. settlers much and I suppose that is an indication of the views of H.M. Gov.

Steward is gone down to Otago for the Champion Race and to look after his sheep run which is close on the Dunstan diggins. He writes that he has lost his money on the race but enjoys

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English (ATL)

his visit very much. He says we should not know Dunedin again and that it is a little Melbourne. They don't seem to have managed their land well for numbers leave because they cannot invest their money. Firth has been here and said he should go to Napier as he was inclined to purchase there, so I dare say you will see him. He was very civil to us. Buddle was also here but he was not by any

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English (ATL)

means as friendly as he used to be. I suppose however that he like many others prefers a rising to a setting sun.

We are very quiet here. The country is charming and the climate delightful so we are sailing in very smooth water after the buffeting we got in N.Z.

English (ATL)

Extract from letter from Gore-Brown to McLean.

Steward tells me you want another sketch of my ugly countenance and so I send you one. Please burn that hideous one which was done in N.Z.

You remember my asking you about Hapuka's pension - on looking over my Mem. book I found my Memorandum to Richmond on the subject; it is dated 3 Jan. 1857 and the original promise to Hapuka is quoted and was forwarded in it. The promise was signed by the civil secretary and dated 6 Oct. 1853.

I only mention this in order to prove the correctness of my memory on the subject. I therefore gave but one pension (that of Taraihi £20) until the war broke out. I would have given many more if I had had the means of doing so but that is not the point at issue. I never, however allude to Grey or his doings in any way, feeling satisfied that time will rectify a great many misconceptions.

Although I have seen no announcement of the fact I assume and hope that you are Superintendent of Hawkes' Bay province and I am quite sure the settlers have chosen the right man in choosing you. Besides your good and sound sense in all ordinary matters, you have a special qualification for your present office, viz. that you are I firmly believe the only man in N.Z. whom the Maoris really trust. If therefore any man can keep the peace you will do so and that is what sheep farmers really want. When there is any account of your doings in the newspaper I wish you would send me one occasionally. I sent you a paper from hence containing a very interesting letter from Amphlet (late of the Niger) who was one of the survivors of that dreadful shipwreck at the Manakau.

I can't yet understand how it happened - the pilot seems to have been steering the vessell from the Flag staff and saw her go aground yet did not recall the Wonga Wonga and send her to assist.

If the Auckland Provincial Govt. would have put a telegraph as I so earnestly urged (both in writing and by speech) the Harrier would have been able to hear of the accident and get out in time to save all lives! Burnett had spent a month with us a at Xmas and we liked him very much indeed so that we felt the disaster very severely.

I hear Grey has gone to Taranaki and hopes to get Tataraimuka back in peace. If he succeeds he will have much to be thankful for. If he fails what is to happen next? The Times does not seem inclined to favour the N.Z. settlers much and I suppose that is an indication of the views of H.M. Gov.

Steward is gone down to Otago for the Champion Race and to look after his sheep run which is close on the Dunstan diggins. He writes that he has lost his money on the race but enjoys his visit very much. He says we should not know Dunedin again and that it is a little Melbourne. They don't seem to have managed their land well for numbers leave because they cannot invest their money. Firth has been here and said he should go to Napier as he was inclined to purchase there, so I dare say you will see him. He was very civil to us. Buddle was also here but he was not by any means as friendly as he used to be. I suppose however that he like many others prefers a rising to a setting sun.

We are very quiet here. The country is charming and the climate delightful so we are sailing in very smooth water after the buffeting we got in N.Z.

Politically, advantage has been taken of your absence to bring forward Bovsfield for the country districts, and he and Tiffen I hear have been canvassing and got the promise of many votes. I saw Captn.Carter this morning and he despairs of his return. The fault is greatly his own, as he evinces no anxiety about the matter. Even yet if he would rouse himself up he might carry the day. I told him this today and old Anderson too who was with him. There is a great amount of talk and little use in the latter.

From a letter, 9.9.63

by John Kinross.

Part of:
Inward letters - Sir Thomas Gore Browne (Governor), Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0185 (71 digitised items)
Series 1 Inward letters (English), Reference Number Series 1 Inward letters (English) (14501 digitised items)
McLean Papers, Reference Number MS-Group-1551 (30238 digitised items)

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