Object #1019505 from MS-Papers-0032-0172

6 pages written 6 Aug 1872 by Captain Walter Charles Brackenbury to Sir Donald McLean

From: Inward letters - W C Brackenbury, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0172 (53 digitised items). 51 letters written Auckland (some addressed from Parnell), 1861-1876 and undated. Includes letter to Brackenbury from Samuel Harding, May 1865.

A transcription/translation of this document (by ATL) appears below.

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Page 1 of 6. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

August 6th. 1872.


My dear McLean,

You asked me to write to you before you left; and I have not done so hitherto because there was really nothing to say. Before you get this, you will have heard the result of the Meeting called to discuss Gillies' motion in reference to the Provinces. Whatever line of action they may decide to

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English (ATL)

adopt, of one thing you may be quite sure, and that is, that with the exception of a very few fanatics, and Provincial bigots, the Aucklanders, Town and Country, are dead against him; and if he ever seeks re-election at the hands of the City, he won't get twenty votes. Of course we can only know what the papers tell us, and believe as much or

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English (ATL)

as little of that as we like; but there is a general feeling of indignation at the idea of the Governor not granting a dissolution. Should you be beaten on Gillies' motion, and desire it. Should you go to the Country on that issue, the result will be the death blow to Provincialism; and I cannot see any constitutional objection which He could raise, to prevent

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English (ATL)

the sense of the Country being taken on so all important a matter. I have personally not much to thank Ministers for, (yourself excepted) but I should be sorry to see you go out, to give place to men, who would endeavour to undo what you have done, and before sufficient time has been given for the development of the great schemes which you and your colleagues have initiated; and which, I firmly believe,

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English (ATL)

will ultimately make this a magnificent country.

I have sent you a few hasty lines on the education question. When you are drinking your sherry some Sunday afternoon, you may run your eye over them; and I think you will agree with me in one thing at least, that in the next General Election, it would be better to have a little more intelligence amongst

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English (ATL)

the people, than is at present brought to the booths by the gentlemen of the Ballot.

I have wearied you enough with this long scrawl, so I will shut up, only saying that I am pretty miserable having nothing to do; that I have taken your advice - live a godly, righteous and somber life, have foresworn sack, and live cleanly; and that if you give me something to do, I have learnt a sufficient lesson to teach me to keep it.

I send this by Mrs. St. John, who goes to-morrow. Mrs. Brack desires her kind regards; and wishing you all the success you wish yourself,

Believe me
Yours very sincerely, (Signed)
W.C. Brackenbury.
To:- The Hon. D. McLean.

English (ATL)

August 6th. 1872.


My dear McLean,

You asked me to write to you before you left; and I have not done so hitherto because there was really nothing to say. Before you get this, you will have heard the result of the Meeting called to discuss Gillies' motion in reference to the Provinces. Whatever line of action they may decide to adopt, of one thing you may be quite sure, and that is, that with the exception of a very few fanatics, and Provincial bigots, the Aucklanders, Town and Country, are dead against him; and if he ever seeks re-election at the hands of the City, he won't get twenty votes. Of course we can only know what the papers tell us, and believe as much or as little of that as we like; but there is a general feeling of indignation at the idea of the Governor not granting a dissolution. Should you be beaten on Gillies' motion, and desire it. Should you go to the Country on that issue, the result will be the death blow to Provincialism; and I cannot see any constitutional objection which He could raise, to prevent the sense of the Country being taken on so all important a matter. I have personally not much to thank Ministers for, (yourself excepted) but I should be sorry to see you go out, to give place to men, who would endeavour to undo what you have done, and before sufficient time has been given for the development of the great schemes which you and your colleagues have initiated; and which, I firmly believe, will ultimately make this a magnificent country.

I have sent you a few hasty lines on the education question. When you are drinking your sherry some Sunday afternoon, you may run your eye over them; and I think you will agree with me in one thing at least, that in the next General Election, it would be better to have a little more intelligence amongst the people, than is at present brought to the booths by the gentlemen of the Ballot.

I have wearied you enough with this long scrawl, so I will shut up, only saying that I am pretty miserable having nothing to do; that I have taken your advice - live a godly, righteous and somber life, have foresworn sack, and live cleanly; and that if you give me something to do, I have learnt a sufficient lesson to teach me to keep it.

I send this by Mrs. St. John, who goes to-morrow. Mrs. Brack desires her kind regards; and wishing you all the success you wish yourself,

Believe me
Yours very sincerely, (Signed)
W.C. Brackenbury.
To:- The Hon. D. McLean.

Part of:
Inward letters - W C Brackenbury, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0172 (53 digitised items)
Series 1 Inward letters (English), Reference Number Series 1 Inward letters (English) (14501 digitised items)
McLean Papers, Reference Number MS-Group-1551 (30238 digitised items)

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