Object #1019363 from MS-Papers-0032-0534

2 pages written 18 Nov 1867 by James Crowe Richmond in Wellington to Sir Donald McLean

From: Inward letters - J C Richmond, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0534 (35 digitised items). 33 letters written from Wellington, Turanganui, Ngatapa, Napier and Nelson, 1865-1870, & undated. Includes letter from Richmond to Ormond, Oct 1868; McLean to Richmond, 7 Jan 1869. Also piece-level inventory.

A transcription/translation of this document (by ATL) appears below.

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English (ATL)

It would be unreasonable to look for a brilliant settlement of these E. Coast affairs when so much has been said and done to impair the prestige of government and to prevent the Maori population from honest cooperation. If you can make the arrangement pay the Expenses and secure some sort of position for the rebels who return you will have done all I am sanguine enough to ask or look for. Most people would fail in even that and if you succeed beyond that it will be so much solid gain.

The West Coast is going on very well. More and the Ngatimaniapo to have returned home to the satisfaction of all concerned. There is no danger in travelling anywhere, and I think we shall have peaceful occupation of the territory. The late Hauhau are miserably poor. I hoped to have a meeting with them on my journey through last week, but they were whakama owing to their want of clothing and food to return our hospitality. They propose a general hui at Ngamotu in December.

As to money payments on the East Coast the best way where they are required will be to make them out of the net proceeds of salds of land ceded. You know we have absolutely no funds available except on those terms.

I remain my dear Maclean
Yours faithfully
J. C. Richmond
His Honor D. Maclean

English (ATL)

Wellington
Nov. 18 /67


My dear Maclean


I am sorry not to get any letter accepting the East Coast job, the more so as Whitmore thinks you are in some way displeased either at the proposal or its manner I hope he is mistaken. At any rate I feel almost certain that you understand that personally I have no desire but to deal with the most perfect respect for yourself and your many public services; that I have no desire to filch any tittle of your credit and honor in the matter for myself or the Government. The true honor of a Government is to know who can do the country's work and to enlist their abilities and influence for the country. It would be unreasonable to look for a brilliant settlement of these E. Coast affairs when so much has been said and done to impair the prestige of government and to prevent the Maori population from honest cooperation. If you can make the arrangement pay the Expenses and secure some sort of position for the rebels who return you will have done all I am sanguine enough to ask or look for. Most people would fail in even that and if you succeed beyond that it will be so much solid gain.

The West Coast is going on very well. More and the Ngatimaniapo to have returned home to the satisfaction of all concerned. There is no danger in travelling anywhere, and I think we shall have peaceful occupation of the territory. The late Hauhau are miserably poor. I hoped to have a meeting with them on my journey through last week, but they were whakama owing to their want of clothing and food to return our hospitality. They propose a general hui at Ngamotu in December.

As to money payments on the East Coast the best way where they are required will be to make them out of the net proceeds of salds of land ceded. You know we have absolutely no funds available except on those terms.

I remain my dear Maclean
Yours faithfully
J. C. Richmond
His Honor D. Maclean

Part of:
Inward letters - J C Richmond, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0534 (35 digitised items)
Series 1 Inward letters (English), Reference Number Series 1 Inward letters (English) (14501 digitised items)
McLean Papers, Reference Number MS-Group-1551 (30238 digitised items)

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