Object #1019337 from MS-Papers-0032-0612

4 pages written 8 Aug 1872 by Hanson Turton and Rev Henry Hanson Turton in Auckland City and Parnell to Sir Donald McLean in Wellington

From: Inward letters - Rev Henry Hanson Turton, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0612 (65 digitised items). Letters written from Taranaki, Auckland and Wellington

A transcription/translation of this document (by ATL) appears below.

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English (ATL)

PRIVATE. Parnell

8th. August 1872.



By dear Sir,

Don't be angry with me for writing once more; but I am sure I must have done something to grieve you, and so forfeit your favour; or you would not have come to Auckland and gone away again without sending for me to pay you a visit.

What it may be I cannot imagine, as I am not concious of having done or said anything which might grieve you, or give you offence; and yet both my friends and family have the idea that such must be the case, since for the past 12 years they have

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English (ATL)

always looked on you, not only as my friend, but as my Patron; and so you have been, and I have never been backward to acknowledge it.

Amongst all your friends you have never had one who has written or spoken more than I have done, in support of what I knew or imagined to be your proveedings or wishes in reference to Native Affairs. We have had so many viws in common on these and other cognate subjects for the past 28 years, that I have found no seruple in doing so; and therefore I have felt it no small affliction - independent altogether of material advantages - to be thus sumarily deprived of your goodwill, without the satisfaction of knowing the reason why.

Gisborne tells me, in one of his letters, that he had ventured to speak to you on the subject, and that you had said how very difficult it was to provide suitable employment for anyone connected with the Government. Having been so many years in public service, I did not think that such an objection would be applied to myself; and if I could only have pulled agreeably with Mr. Febton at the time I was Crown Agent in the Native Land Court, I suppose I might have been in the Government still. But that it was impossible to do, with any respect to my own feelings.

When Mr. Fox engaged me as Special Commissioner in 1864, he kindly promised me that as far as he was able, my employment in Government service should be permanent. Otherwise I should never have relinquished a

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English (ATL)

good business as land Agent; which, when once surrendered, is not easily recovered again. And when I afterwards, in ignorance, wrote to Mr. Fox on the subject, he referred me to yourself, as having all the details of the Native office under your own control; and I never thought but what in one of the Departments, there might be found a situation for me, in which I could give you satisfaction, and justify the expenditure.

But when I lately saw that Col. Russell was gazetted as Inspector of Native Schools, I must acknowledge that I felt very much disappointment; since of all others, that is one of the employments in which I think I might have succeeded best; and as it is, I fear that a single

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English (ATL)

officer will not be able to do all the work, which such an inspection will require.

Of course you will know the interest I have taken in this kind of labour, when even (as at New Plymouth) I was never paid for it. tending to it, and when it was neglected on most other stations in the Colony.

But all such regret is useless now; and so I must apologise for mentioning it; - as indeed I do for troubling you at all; but I have not, like some, been an importunate beggar, and if unsuccessful now, may probably never trouble you again.

But for all that, you have my best wishes, and sincere thanks for all past favours bestowed on me and mine.


Yours very truly (Signed)
Hanson Turton.
To:- The Hon. Donald McLean Wellington.

English (ATL)

PRIVATE. Parnell

8th. August 1872.



By dear Sir,

Don't be angry with me for writing once more; but I am sure I must have done something to grieve you, and so forfeit your favour; or you would not have come to Auckland and gone away again without sending for me to pay you a visit.

What it may be I cannot imagine, as I am not concious of having done or said anything which might grieve you, or give you offence; and yet both my friends and family have the idea that such must be the case, since for the past 12 years they have always looked on you, not only as my friend, but as my Patron; and so you have been, and I have never been backward to acknowledge it.

Amongst all your friends you have never had one who has written or spoken more than I have done, in support of what I knew or imagined to be your proveedings or wishes in reference to Native Affairs. We have had so many viws in common on these and other cognate subjects for the past 28 years, that I have found no seruple in doing so; and therefore I have felt it no small affliction - independent altogether of material advantages - to be thus sumarily deprived of your goodwill, without the satisfaction of knowing the reason why.

Gisborne tells me, in one of his letters, that he had ventured to speak to you on the subject, and that you had said how very difficult it was to provide suitable employment for anyone connected with the Government. Having been so many years in public service, I did not think that such an objection would be applied to myself; and if I could only have pulled agreeably with Mr. Febton at the time I was Crown Agent in the Native Land Court, I suppose I might have been in the Government still. But that it was impossible to do, with any respect to my own feelings.

When Mr. Fox engaged me as Special Commissioner in 1864, he kindly promised me that as far as he was able, my employment in Government service should be permanent. Otherwise I should never have relinquished a good business as land Agent; which, when once surrendered, is not easily recovered again. And when I afterwards, in ignorance, wrote to Mr. Fox on the subject, he referred me to yourself, as having all the details of the Native office under your own control; and I never thought but what in one of the Departments, there might be found a situation for me, in which I could give you satisfaction, and justify the expenditure.

But when I lately saw that Col. Russell was gazetted as Inspector of Native Schools, I must acknowledge that I felt very much disappointment; since of all others, that is one of the employments in which I think I might have succeeded best; and as it is, I fear that a single officer will not be able to do all the work, which such an inspection will require.

Of course you will know the interest I have taken in this kind of labour, when even (as at New Plymouth) I was never paid for it. tending to it, and when it was neglected on most other stations in the Colony.

But all such regret is useless now; and so I must apologise for mentioning it; - as indeed I do for troubling you at all; but I have not, like some, been an importunate beggar, and if unsuccessful now, may probably never trouble you again.

But for all that, you have my best wishes, and sincere thanks for all past favours bestowed on me and mine.


Yours very truly (Signed)
Hanson Turton.
To:- The Hon. Donald McLean Wellington.

Part of:
Inward letters - Rev Henry Hanson Turton, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0612 (65 digitised items)
Series 1 Inward letters (English), Reference Number Series 1 Inward letters (English) (14501 digitised items)
McLean Papers, Reference Number MS-Group-1551 (30238 digitised items)

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