Object #1018894 from MS-Papers-0032-0227

5 pages written 21 Jun 1852 by George Sisson Cooper in Taranaki Region to Sir Donald McLean

From: Inward letters - George Sisson Cooper, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0227 (70 digitised items). 67 letters written from Taranaki, Hawke's Bay and Wellington. Contains correspondence between McLean and Cooper with regard to the purchase of Maori land in Taranaki, Hawke's Bay and Wairarapa; the correspondence also contains information and discussions about general Maori affairs in these areas, and about personal matters. Includes two letters from Mclean to Cooper, 24 Mar & 1 May 1854

A transcription/translation of this document (by ATL) appears below.

Download alow-resolution PDF or high-resolution PDF

Page 1 of 5. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

Taranaki

June 21st. 1852.



My dear McLean,

The enclosed letter from Tamati Waka is as you will see written in his capacity of councellor, friend and amanuensis to Iharaira; and as it is addressed to you as well as the Governor I have thought it better to enclose it to you as you will be able to explain it to His Excellency. My kupu about the tuna refers to an answer I made to Martin Luther at the meeting I had with them at Hoe Waka - he was enumerating a long list of things to be given in payment for te Putatutonga, including cattle, horses, carts, thrashing machines and in fact every conceivable article of farming implements, to which I replied "Perhaps you would like a man of war, as well - or shall I ask the

Page 2 of 5. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

Governor to send you a steamer." The allegory of the clover seed is rather good, is it not? You will see that the main object of the letter is to offer a block north of the Bell, and extending to the Mangoraka. I strongly suspect however that this is only held out as a bait to obtain more money for te Putatutonga. I have resolutely refused to listen to it until the Bell is settled for.

I also send one to you from Tamati Wiremu te Ngahuru. He was very sulky when he recd. the Governor's letter, as he expected an increase of pay. He was also annoyed because the letter did not acknowledge past services, as he construed the first

Page 3 of 5. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

paragraph to mean that his work as Kai whakawa was but now beginning. If you will refer to the letter in Domett's office you will see what I mean. I told him however that he was mistaken and that the real meaning of the paragraph was that he had been the beginning of the good work at Omata which I really believe to be the intent of the letter. He had fully made up his mind to resign, in fact he did tender to me his final resignation, and asked for writing materials to do it officially, but, I astonished him a little by telling him I had not authority to receive it, and that he must send a letter to the Governor, if his resolve was unchangeable. I thought however that it would be only courteous in him to answer the Governor's letter first. This

Page 4 of 5. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

seemed to throw and entirely new light upon the subject, and after a little further conversation, a small present of tobacco, and a little well timed flattery he went off in good humour and made up his mind not to resign at all. He has now written a very civil friendly letter to Sir George which I have sent by this mail - but I wish you wd. explain all this to His Excellency that he may know how matters stand with this man. I have asked you to do it as you know his character. We are under great obligations to him for the road through Tapuae wh. never could have been carried for his exertions, Halse is writing about that this post.

The new R.M. arrived last Saturday, he tells me he has redd, the £30 from you. He is to receive the seals today. Standish has resigned through some dislike he has to


Mr. Flight. Believe me Faithfully yours
G. S. Cooper.

Page 5 of 5. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)


P.S. In his letter to the Governor Tamati cunningly throws the blame of his intended resignation upon the other Natives, as he is now some what ashamed of his hasty resolve. I know however that such is not the case, it was his own sole idea. Several Natives including Cutfield's "Hone" came to me to say Tamati intended to resign, and to beg I would not listen to him.

English (ATL)

Taranaki

June 21st. 1852.



My dear McLean,

The enclosed letter from Tamati Waka is as you will see written in his capacity of councellor, friend and amanuensis to Iharaira; and as it is addressed to you as well as the Governor I have thought it better to enclose it to you as you will be able to explain it to His Excellency. My kupu about the tuna refers to an answer I made to Martin Luther at the meeting I had with them at Hoe Waka - he was enumerating a long list of things to be given in payment for te Putatutonga, including cattle, horses, carts, thrashing machines and in fact every conceivable article of farming implements, to which I replied "Perhaps you would like a man of war, as well - or shall I ask the Governor to send you a steamer." The allegory of the clover seed is rather good, is it not? You will see that the main object of the letter is to offer a block north of the Bell, and extending to the Mangoraka. I strongly suspect however that this is only held out as a bait to obtain more money for te Putatutonga. I have resolutely refused to listen to it until the Bell is settled for.

I also send one to you from Tamati Wiremu te Ngahuru. He was very sulky when he recd. the Governor's letter, as he expected an increase of pay. He was also annoyed because the letter did not acknowledge past services, as he construed the first paragraph to mean that his work as Kai whakawa was but now beginning. If you will refer to the letter in Domett's office you will see what I mean. I told him however that he was mistaken and that the real meaning of the paragraph was that he had been the beginning of the good work at Omata which I really believe to be the intent of the letter. He had fully made up his mind to resign, in fact he did tender to me his final resignation, and asked for writing materials to do it officially, but, I astonished him a little by telling him I had not authority to receive it, and that he must send a letter to the Governor, if his resolve was unchangeable. I thought however that it would be only courteous in him to answer the Governor's letter first. This seemed to throw and entirely new light upon the subject, and after a little further conversation, a small present of tobacco, and a little well timed flattery he went off in good humour and made up his mind not to resign at all. He has now written a very civil friendly letter to Sir George which I have sent by this mail - but I wish you wd. explain all this to His Excellency that he may know how matters stand with this man. I have asked you to do it as you know his character. We are under great obligations to him for the road through Tapuae wh. never could have been carried for his exertions, Halse is writing about that this post.

The new R.M. arrived last Saturday, he tells me he has redd, the £30 from you. He is to receive the seals today. Standish has resigned through some dislike he has to


Mr. Flight. Believe me Faithfully yours
G. S. Cooper.

P.S. In his letter to the Governor Tamati cunningly throws the blame of his intended resignation upon the other Natives, as he is now some what ashamed of his hasty resolve. I know however that such is not the case, it was his own sole idea. Several Natives including Cutfield's "Hone" came to me to say Tamati intended to resign, and to beg I would not listen to him.

Part of:
Inward letters - George Sisson Cooper, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0227 (70 digitised items)
Series 1 Inward letters (English), Reference Number Series 1 Inward letters (English) (14501 digitised items)
McLean Papers, Reference Number MS-Group-1551 (30238 digitised items)

Usage: You can search, browse, print and download items from this website for research and personal study. You are welcome to reproduce the above image(s) on your blog or another website, but please maintain the integrity of the image (i.e. don't crop, recolour or overprint it), reproduce the image's caption information and link back to here (http://mp.natlib.govt.nz/detail/?id=1018894). If you would like to use the above image(s) in a different way (e.g. in a print publication), or use the transcription or translation, permission must be obtained. More information about copyright and usage can be found on the Copyright and Usage page of the NLNZ web site.

External Links:
View Full Descriptive Record in TAPUHI

Leave a comment

This function is coming soon.

Latest comments