Object #1018792 from MS-Papers-0032-0209

4 pages written 19 Nov 1860 by Wellington Carrington in New Plymouth District

From: Inward letters - Surnames, Carrington, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0209 (32 digitised items). Correspondents:F A Carrington, Taranaki, 1841-1873 (15 letters); Jane Carrington, Taranaki, 1876 (1 letter); W Carrington, Taranaki, 1847-1870 (16 letters, including one letter to his brother Fred).

A transcription/translation of this document (by ATL) appears below.

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Page 1 of 4. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

New Plymouth,
19th Novr., 1860.


My dear Sir,

Since I last wrote you the Battle of Mahoetahi has taken place, in which, you are aware, the natives lost a great many men, including some of their principal chiefs. What effect this may have on the Waikato Tribes it is impossible (at this place) to predict at present.

According to ''Maori ritenga'' they ought to come down here, and try their hand at it again, on the ground where the chiefs fell.

Since the battle, messengers have constantly been going backwards and forwards, between Waitara and Taranaki, on Saturday last some of the Taranaki came up, as far as Hauranga, under Paringa Kingi, but I hear today they have gone back again. The natives say, that a party

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English (ATL)

of Waikato's intend leaving Waitara today with the intention of commencing ''konihi'' again, they will not risk another battle on the open ground, without increased numbers, consequently, marauding is the most successful game they can pursue at present. I merely give you this as Maori talk, but at the same time think there is something in it, and I should not be at all surprized if some of the Taranaki were to come up and join them, particularly if they (the Waikato's) make the request.

I dont think it safe at present for small parties to venture far back, as it is more than probable they would fall into an ambush, I myself have been frequently warned not to go as far as Tapuae, till they let me know the road is safe.

I have heard of no movement lately amongst the Ngatiruanui, I fancy there are none of them at present in Taranaki, the last account I had they were busily employed about their cultivations.

I think the Taranaki are heartily sick of the

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English (ATL)

war, but at the same time, they dont appear to have any inclination to deliver up the murderers, of course they must take the consequences.

Thos. Williams (Te Ngahuru) was discharged on the 6th Inst. from the Hospital, but has had a relapse, and is now lying very ill at the Poutoke, I am afraid he is in a very precarious state.

We are all anxiously looking out for the arrival of more Troops, as at present the Force in the Town is small, and none could be spared for any expeditions.

I remain, Dear Sir,
Yours faithfully,
W. Carrington.

P. S. I should be much obliged if you would send me authority to draw my pay, as some money would now be very acceptable, it is a long time since I received any. W. C.

English (ATL)

New Plymouth,
19th Novr., 1860.


My dear Sir,

Since I last wrote you the Battle of Mahoetahi has taken place, in which, you are aware, the natives lost a great many men, including some of their principal chiefs. What effect this may have on the Waikato Tribes it is impossible (at this place) to predict at present.

According to ''Maori ritenga'' they ought to come down here, and try their hand at it again, on the ground where the chiefs fell.

Since the battle, messengers have constantly been going backwards and forwards, between Waitara and Taranaki, on Saturday last some of the Taranaki came up, as far as Hauranga, under Paringa Kingi, but I hear today they have gone back again. The natives say, that a party of Waikato's intend leaving Waitara today with the intention of commencing ''konihi'' again, they will not risk another battle on the open ground, without increased numbers, consequently, marauding is the most successful game they can pursue at present. I merely give you this as Maori talk, but at the same time think there is something in it, and I should not be at all surprized if some of the Taranaki were to come up and join them, particularly if they (the Waikato's) make the request.

I dont think it safe at present for small parties to venture far back, as it is more than probable they would fall into an ambush, I myself have been frequently warned not to go as far as Tapuae, till they let me know the road is safe.

I have heard of no movement lately amongst the Ngatiruanui, I fancy there are none of them at present in Taranaki, the last account I had they were busily employed about their cultivations.

I think the Taranaki are heartily sick of the war, but at the same time, they dont appear to have any inclination to deliver up the murderers, of course they must take the consequences.

Thos. Williams (Te Ngahuru) was discharged on the 6th Inst. from the Hospital, but has had a relapse, and is now lying very ill at the Poutoke, I am afraid he is in a very precarious state.

We are all anxiously looking out for the arrival of more Troops, as at present the Force in the Town is small, and none could be spared for any expeditions.

I remain, Dear Sir,
Yours faithfully,
W. Carrington.

P. S. I should be much obliged if you would send me authority to draw my pay, as some money would now be very acceptable, it is a long time since I received any. W. C.

Part of:
Inward letters - Surnames, Carrington, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0209 (32 digitised items)
Series 1 Inward letters (English), Reference Number Series 1 Inward letters (English) (14501 digitised items)
McLean Papers, Reference Number MS-Group-1551 (30238 digitised items)

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