Object #1018752 from MS-Papers-0032-0484

7 pages written 17 May 1870 by John Davies Ormond in Napier City to Sir Donald McLean

From: Inward letters - J D Ormond, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0484 (67 digitised items). 65 letters written from Napier. Includes copy of letter from Te Poihipi Tukairangi, Pahautea Kaingaroa (in Maori), 14 May 1870; letter from Te Moananui to Hamana Tiakiwai, Napier, 3 Apr 1870.Also letter from Ormond to Daniel Pollen; Ormond to Lieut Col James Fraser, 3 Dec 1869; Lieut Col James Fraser to Capt Reuner, 4 Dec 1869.

A transcription/translation of this document (by ATL) appears below.

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Page 1 of 7. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

COPY. Napier.

May 17th. 1870.



My dear McLean,

I have just finished writing my address to the Council for tomorrow; and it is pretty late; so you must not expect much of a letter. I have yours by the ''Ashley''; and also your last by Bendall of the Star, to reply to.

Vogel, I saw on his way down; and had some talk with him.

Your last letters have been mainly upon the Taupo Meeting question; and I have now advised Poihipi that it must be deferred. I agree with your conclusion that if demands were likely to be made, which could not be met, that it is better not to have them made just now. After the Assembly is over, well and good; but certainly not now.

I had no idea the Waikato's would have been so stiff as they are about the Wire and Road questions; but it seems Rewi, when at Tapuaeharara, the other day, demanded in the strongest way that Poihipi should stop his road and wire work. Old Poihipi behaved well; and told him to interfere when the work came on his ground, and not before. Poihipi has sent a messenger down to give me result of Rewi's korero; and that is it. Rewi told Poihipi that Tawhio and all Waikato should come to the Meeting. It seems a

Page 2 of 7. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

pity now Tawhio was to be got at, that our tactics should make it undesirable to meet him. However, I have told Poihipi the Hui is only deferred; and that you will hold the big Meeting on the closing of the Assembly. He will be very much disappointed; but I wrote him, so as to make it fall as easily as possible.

Locke goes up day after tomorrow, and takes Heu Heu, and a deputation from these Ahuriri natives, to bring back Poihipi, and the rest of the Taupo's. An endeavour will be made to get Matiaha and Wiripo to accompany them. Tareha says they will come. I have my doubts about it. At any rate you will have to arrange to meet Poihipi and the rest of the Taupo's here; and I shall like to know as early as possible when to tell the natives you will be here.

Vogel told me Clarke had gone to pay the Arawa; and that he was going to pay them in full. Is it too late to stop that being done? If it is done in the case of the Arawa; then not only will Taupo want it, but the Wanganui's also; and even these people will be noisy, if they hear of such a settlement. Pay a good round sum, if you like, to the Arawa; but repudiate that daily pay business; or you will find the account you will have to present to the Assembly will not be satisfactory.

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English (ATL)


My arrangements with these people is to pay a bonus of £500, and £100 for a few of the principal men; also some bills they ran up on their way to Taupo, amounting to about £100 more,- in all £700. I think they are all satisfied, except Renata;and Karaitiana told me today he would attend when the people got together at Pakowhai, and join in accepting it as a settlement. However, if Clarke pays the Arawa daily pay, it will bring the whole subject up again; and that is why I write about it. Fox, in a telegram to-day, said he trusted the Pay Question would be consideered; as he had made statements at Dunedin and Christchurch, which would be questioned if this were done.

I have little news to give you respecting operations. The weather was very bad, and delayed everything; but it has been beautiful the last few days. Ropata should be at the Lake to-day; and Hamlin and the Wairoa's are there waiting his arrival, and making canoes to cross in. They had two ready when Hamlin last reported; and were making more. They have found the enemy's cultivations, and are living upon them.

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English (ATL)


My latest dates from Opotiki are to the 12th. St. John had been detained by floods; but was to go next day, 13th., to Wai-o-eha and Waimana, in search of Kooti. I trust your recall did not reach him before he started, and stop his Expedition. I have no doubt Kooti is there; and if he could have been hunted to either Rua Tahuna or Waikaremoana, we could have got him, I believe. I am afraid St. John's force is not much; otherwise, I should hope much from his Expedition.

From Taupo I hear Mair and Preece will be at Rangitiki tomorrow; and Roberts will meet them. Preece writes on the 14th. that he believes Ureweras will surrender; and that Tairaa and Hapurona will give themselves up. If they do, Urewera is finished. I have sent instructions to further the surrender of the Tribe by all means; and if they do, to offer free pardon to any hapu that will lead our forces to Te Kooti; or bring him in. Failing the Urewera coming out, I have told Roberts to move in with the whole force, about the 20th,- and force a surrender. I have advised Ropata of this move from Taupo side; and sent him supplies to enable him to move from the Lake and act in concert.

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English (ATL)


I know the success of these things just now depends on the weather; but it may be right. I look on the destruction of the Lake Kaingas as nothing. They are sure to be cleared out, unless they bolt before Ropata gets up. The main party of the Ureweras are at Rua Tahuna; and a little more pressure will, I trust, get them. I shall have no time for Officials; so you must take this as all my information.

What have you done about Native Land Court Sitting? Please see we have one here soon. There are a number of large cases interested, in which big sums of money are involved. Fenton is very snappish to Locke; and the other day, sent back all the papers about the Forty Mile Bush applications; and said they must come through some regular form or other. These Courts should facilitate, in place of obstructing business; and so far as the Forty Mile Bush is concerned, I hope you will take care that it is not omitted from the list of cases for first Court. I look on that question as of great importance, and a heavy card in your hands for the Assembly. Pray order a sitting of the Court without delay.

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English (ATL)


About your Runs,- they are all right. I paid the assessments, £49 - 10. Kinross can pay me when he comes back,- or you can, if you like. It is very careless of Kinross, leaving such things unattended to. I know nothing of the Warrant for the rumours going about; but it is said Kinross is done up. There is no doubt he is very hard up. It is freely talked about here that he will stop directly. Watt is delaying going home in the expectation of taking up the best of his clients. It may be all stuff; I just tell you what is said here.

From Gisborne today I hear Mr. Rochfort of Auckland, Barrister and Attorney, is to have the offer of Curling's place, and be District Judge. He says he is more suitable than Lascelles. I want to get a good man, who he is I do not care. I think they will give Curling something to clear out with. I got £20 advance for him today, out of Gisborne. Poor devil,- he has not a penny in the world.

I am glad you have got rid of Dilliet (?). I know

Page 7 of 7. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

he is a little blackguard, and has been playing you false for a long time. Keep that place for Green. I shall not want him after the Council is over; and he can have that until something more permanent turns up for him. The stupid ass thinks he ought to have had the R.M.-ship here; but he is quite unfit for such a place.

To-morrow I meet the Council, and have all ready for them. I have worked the last fortnight every night till 1 or 2 in the morning; and am getting very sick of it. I do not expect much trouble from the Council. The Province is doing well; revenue increasing from all sources. I must close. I am half asleep.


Yours always. (Signed)
J.D. Ormond.

English (ATL)

COPY. Napier.

May 17th. 1870.



My dear McLean,

I have just finished writing my address to the Council for tomorrow; and it is pretty late; so you must not expect much of a letter. I have yours by the ''Ashley''; and also your last by Bendall of the Star, to reply to.

Vogel, I saw on his way down; and had some talk with him.

Your last letters have been mainly upon the Taupo Meeting question; and I have now advised Poihipi that it must be deferred. I agree with your conclusion that if demands were likely to be made, which could not be met, that it is better not to have them made just now. After the Assembly is over, well and good; but certainly not now.

I had no idea the Waikato's would have been so stiff as they are about the Wire and Road questions; but it seems Rewi, when at Tapuaeharara, the other day, demanded in the strongest way that Poihipi should stop his road and wire work. Old Poihipi behaved well; and told him to interfere when the work came on his ground, and not before. Poihipi has sent a messenger down to give me result of Rewi's korero; and that is it. Rewi told Poihipi that Tawhio and all Waikato should come to the Meeting. It seems a pity now Tawhio was to be got at, that our tactics should make it undesirable to meet him. However, I have told Poihipi the Hui is only deferred; and that you will hold the big Meeting on the closing of the Assembly. He will be very much disappointed; but I wrote him, so as to make it fall as easily as possible.

Locke goes up day after tomorrow, and takes Heu Heu, and a deputation from these Ahuriri natives, to bring back Poihipi, and the rest of the Taupo's. An endeavour will be made to get Matiaha and Wiripo to accompany them. Tareha says they will come. I have my doubts about it. At any rate you will have to arrange to meet Poihipi and the rest of the Taupo's here; and I shall like to know as early as possible when to tell the natives you will be here.

Vogel told me Clarke had gone to pay the Arawa; and that he was going to pay them in full. Is it too late to stop that being done? If it is done in the case of the Arawa; then not only will Taupo want it, but the Wanganui's also; and even these people will be noisy, if they hear of such a settlement. Pay a good round sum, if you like, to the Arawa; but repudiate that daily pay business; or you will find the account you will have to present to the Assembly will not be satisfactory.

My arrangements with these people is to pay a bonus of £500, and £100 for a few of the principal men; also some bills they ran up on their way to Taupo, amounting to about £100 more,- in all £700. I think they are all satisfied, except Renata;and Karaitiana told me today he would attend when the people got together at Pakowhai, and join in accepting it as a settlement. However, if Clarke pays the Arawa daily pay, it will bring the whole subject up again; and that is why I write about it. Fox, in a telegram to-day, said he trusted the Pay Question would be consideered; as he had made statements at Dunedin and Christchurch, which would be questioned if this were done.

I have little news to give you respecting operations. The weather was very bad, and delayed everything; but it has been beautiful the last few days. Ropata should be at the Lake to-day; and Hamlin and the Wairoa's are there waiting his arrival, and making canoes to cross in. They had two ready when Hamlin last reported; and were making more. They have found the enemy's cultivations, and are living upon them.

My latest dates from Opotiki are to the 12th. St. John had been detained by floods; but was to go next day, 13th., to Wai-o-eha and Waimana, in search of Kooti. I trust your recall did not reach him before he started, and stop his Expedition. I have no doubt Kooti is there; and if he could have been hunted to either Rua Tahuna or Waikaremoana, we could have got him, I believe. I am afraid St. John's force is not much; otherwise, I should hope much from his Expedition.

From Taupo I hear Mair and Preece will be at Rangitiki tomorrow; and Roberts will meet them. Preece writes on the 14th. that he believes Ureweras will surrender; and that Tairaa and Hapurona will give themselves up. If they do, Urewera is finished. I have sent instructions to further the surrender of the Tribe by all means; and if they do, to offer free pardon to any hapu that will lead our forces to Te Kooti; or bring him in. Failing the Urewera coming out, I have told Roberts to move in with the whole force, about the 20th,- and force a surrender. I have advised Ropata of this move from Taupo side; and sent him supplies to enable him to move from the Lake and act in concert.

I know the success of these things just now depends on the weather; but it may be right. I look on the destruction of the Lake Kaingas as nothing. They are sure to be cleared out, unless they bolt before Ropata gets up. The main party of the Ureweras are at Rua Tahuna; and a little more pressure will, I trust, get them. I shall have no time for Officials; so you must take this as all my information.

What have you done about Native Land Court Sitting? Please see we have one here soon. There are a number of large cases interested, in which big sums of money are involved. Fenton is very snappish to Locke; and the other day, sent back all the papers about the Forty Mile Bush applications; and said they must come through some regular form or other. These Courts should facilitate, in place of obstructing business; and so far as the Forty Mile Bush is concerned, I hope you will take care that it is not omitted from the list of cases for first Court. I look on that question as of great importance, and a heavy card in your hands for the Assembly. Pray order a sitting of the Court without delay.

About your Runs,- they are all right. I paid the assessments, £49 - 10. Kinross can pay me when he comes back,- or you can, if you like. It is very careless of Kinross, leaving such things unattended to. I know nothing of the Warrant for the rumours going about; but it is said Kinross is done up. There is no doubt he is very hard up. It is freely talked about here that he will stop directly. Watt is delaying going home in the expectation of taking up the best of his clients. It may be all stuff; I just tell you what is said here.

From Gisborne today I hear Mr. Rochfort of Auckland, Barrister and Attorney, is to have the offer of Curling's place, and be District Judge. He says he is more suitable than Lascelles. I want to get a good man, who he is I do not care. I think they will give Curling something to clear out with. I got £20 advance for him today, out of Gisborne. Poor devil,- he has not a penny in the world.

I am glad you have got rid of Dilliet (?). I know he is a little blackguard, and has been playing you false for a long time. Keep that place for Green. I shall not want him after the Council is over; and he can have that until something more permanent turns up for him. The stupid ass thinks he ought to have had the R.M.-ship here; but he is quite unfit for such a place.

To-morrow I meet the Council, and have all ready for them. I have worked the last fortnight every night till 1 or 2 in the morning; and am getting very sick of it. I do not expect much trouble from the Council. The Province is doing well; revenue increasing from all sources. I must close. I am half asleep.


Yours always. (Signed)
J.D. Ormond.

Part of:
Inward letters - J D Ormond, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0484 (67 digitised items)
Series 1 Inward letters (English), Reference Number Series 1 Inward letters (English) (14501 digitised items)
McLean Papers, Reference Number MS-Group-1551 (30238 digitised items)

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